128

Does R have a concept of += (plus equals) or ++ (plus plus) as c++/c#/others do?

  • 7
    No, to do x += 1 or x++ - x = x + 1 works. – Joshua Dawson Mar 29 '17 at 6:12
94

No, it doesn't, see: R Language Definition: Operators

  • And, it'll throw some funny errors, if you are using them... – skyin Mar 30 '15 at 11:01
59

Following @GregaKešpret you can make an infix operator:

`%+=%` = function(e1,e2) eval.parent(substitute(e1 <- e1 + e2))
x = 1
x %+=% 2 ; x
  • 6
    (+1), but a word of warning. Typing x = %+=% y/2 returns x = (x + y)/2. Adding parenthesis, i.e. x = %+=% (y/2) solves the problem. – knrumsey Sep 21 '18 at 21:08
  • @knrumsey Why is that? I would've guessed division would be a higher precedence operator. – David Kelley Feb 17 at 22:16
  • @DavidKelley Not sure. I'm with you there. I ran into this issue working on a project once and it took me an hour to find the issue. – knrumsey Feb 17 at 22:38
31

R doesn't have a concept of increment operator (as for example ++ in C). However, it is not difficult to implement one yourself, for example:

inc <- function(x)
{
 eval.parent(substitute(x <- x + 1))
}

In that case you would call

x <- 10
inc(x)

However, it introduces function call overhead, so it's slower than typing x <- x + 1 yourself. If I'm not mistaken increment operator was introduced to make job for compiler easier, as it could convert the code to those machine language instructions directly.

  • 3
    This function cannot return the value and then increment like a postincrement ++. It's more similar to += or preincrement ++. – Megatron Jul 10 '15 at 18:52
  • Wrong! Incrementation wasn't introduced to make the job of compiler easier. INC instruction was introduced in processors primarily for implementing counters (cf. Intel Software Developer's Manual). I will update the answer. – banan3'14 Nov 4 '18 at 22:50
17

R doesn't have these operations because (most) objects in R are immutable. They do not change. Typically, when it looks like you're modifying an object, you're actually modifying a copy.

  • 13
    While immutability is a great/desirable property for objects (read: less bugs) I don't think immutability relates to the += question. In other languages += can be applied to immutable types (like strings in .net). The operation simply creates a new object and assigns the given variable to that new object. Immutability is maintained and the variable is updated. – SFun28 Apr 21 '11 at 13:35
  • 4
    Good point. Immutability certainly makes this sort of operation less natural, however. – hadley Apr 22 '11 at 3:20
15

Increment and decrement by 10.

require(Hmisc)
inc(x) <- 10 

dec(x) <- 10
  • 5
    These functions appear to have been removed from Hmisc as of version 4.1.0. – llasram Mar 7 '18 at 15:13
3

We released a package, roperators, to help with this kind of thing. You can read more about it here: https://happylittlescripts.blogspot.com/2018/09/make-your-r-code-nicer-with-roperators.html

install.packages('roperators')
require(roperators)

x <- 1:3
x %+=% 1; x
x %-=% 3; x
y <- c('a', 'b', 'c')
y %+=% 'text'; y
y %-=% 'text'; y

# etc
3

We can override +. If unary + is used and its argument is itself an unary + call, then increment the relevant variable in the calling environment.

`+` <- function(e1,e2){
    # if unary `+`, keep original behavior
    if(missing(e2)) {
      s_e1 <- substitute(e1)
      # if e1 (the argument of unary +) is itself an unary `+` operation
      if(length(s_e1) == 2 && 
         identical(s_e1[[1]], quote(`+`)) && 
         length(s_e1[[2]]) == 1){
        # increment value in parent environment
        eval.parent(substitute(e1 <- e1 + 1,list(e1 = s_e1[[2]])))
      # else unary `+` should just return it's input
      } else e1
    # if binary `+`, keep original behavior
    } else .Primitive("+")(e1,e2)
}

x <- 10
++x
x
# [1] 11

other operations don't change :

x + 2
# [1] 13
x ++ 2
# [1] 13
+x
# [1] 11
x
# [1] 11

Don't do it though as you'll slow down everything. Or do it in another environment and make sure you don't have big loops on these instructions.

You can also just do this :

`++` <- function(x) eval.parent(substitute(x <-x +1))
a <- 1
`++`(a)
a
# [1] 2
  • 1
    Great answer to an old question. – Oliver Feb 10 at 22:40

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