46

I was curios about the question: Eliminate consecutive duplicates of list elements, and how it should be implemented in Python.

What I came up with is this:

list = [1,1,1,1,1,1,2,3,4,4,5,1,2]
i = 0

while i < len(list)-1:
    if list[i] == list[i+1]:
        del list[i]
    else:
        i = i+1

Output:

[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 1, 2]

Which I guess is ok.

So I got curious, and wanted to see if I could delete the elements that had consecutive duplicates and get this output:

[2, 3, 5, 1, 2]

For that I did this:

list = [1,1,1,1,1,1,2,3,4,4,5,1,2]
i = 0
dupe = False

while i < len(list)-1:
    if list[i] == list[i+1]:
        del list[i]
        dupe = True
    elif dupe:
        del list[i]
        dupe = False
    else:
        i += 1

But it seems sort of clumsy and not pythonic, do you have any smarter / more elegant / more efficient way to implement this?

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68
>>> L = [1,1,1,1,1,1,2,3,4,4,5,1,2]
>>> from itertools import groupby
>>> [x[0] for x in groupby(L)]
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 1, 2]

If you wish, you can use map instead of the list comprehension

>>> from operator import itemgetter
>>> map(itemgetter(0), groupby(L))
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 1, 2]

For the second part

>>> [x for x, y in groupby(L) if len(list(y)) < 2]
[2, 3, 5, 1, 2]

If you don't want to create the temporary list just to take the length, you can use sum over a generator expression

>>> [x for x, y in groupby(L) if sum(1 for i in y) < 2]
[2, 3, 5, 1, 2]
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  • Note that the docs state that "the iterable needs to already be sorted", which is not the case for the input data here. Still, the proposed solution worked perfectly for the cases I've tested. – normanius Dec 29 '19 at 23:56
  • 1
    @normanius, to remove all duplicates, the input would need to be sorted. This question is only about removing consecutive duplicates, so you would not want to sort in this case. – John La Rooy Jan 3 at 0:58
19

Oneliner in pure Python

[v for i, v in enumerate(your_list) if i == 0 or v != your_list[i-1]]
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5

If you use Python 3.8+, you can use assignment expression :=:

list1 = [1, 2, 3, 3, 4, 3, 5, 5]

prev = object()
list1 = [prev:=v for v in list1 if prev!=v]

print(list1)

Prints:

[1, 2, 3, 4, 3, 5]
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2

Here is a solution without dependence on outside packages:

list = [1,1,1,1,1,1,2,3,4,4,5,1,2] 
L = list + [999]  # append a unique dummy element to properly handle -1 index
[l for i, l in enumerate(L) if l != L[i - 1]][:-1] # drop the dummy element

Then I noted that Ulf Aslak's similar solution is cleaner :)

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2

A "lazy" approach would be to use itertools.groupby.

import itertools

list1 = [1, 2, 3, 3, 4, 3, 5, 5]
list1 = [g for g, _ in itertools.groupby(list1)]
print(list1)

outputs

[1, 2, 3, 4, 3, 5]
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2

You can do this by using zip_longest() + list comprehension.

from itertools import zip_longest 
list1 = [1, 2, 3, 3, 4, 3, 5, 5].
     # using zip_longest()+ list comprehension       
     res = [i for i, j in zip_longest(list1, list1[1:]) 
                                                            if i != j] 
        print ("List after removing consecutive duplicates : " +  str(res)) 
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1

Plenty of better/more pythonic answers above, however one could also accomplish this task using list.pop():

my_list = [1, 2, 3, 3, 4, 3, 5, 5]
for x in my_list[:-1]:
    next_index = my_list.index(x) + 1
    if my_list[next_index] == x:
        my_list.pop(next_index)

outputs

[1, 2, 3, 4, 3, 5]
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0

Another possible one-liner, using functools.reduce (excluding the import) - with the downside that string and list require slightly different implementations:

>>> from functools import reduce

>>> reduce(lambda a, b: a if a[-1:] == [b] else a + [b], [1,1,2,3,4,4,5,1,2], [])
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 1, 2]

>>> reduce(lambda a, b: a if a[-1:] == b else a+b, 'aa  bbb cc')
'a b c'
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0

To Eliminate consecutive duplicates of list elements; as an alternative, you may use itertools.zip_longest() with list comprehension as:

>>> from itertools import zip_longest

>>> my_list = [1,1,1,1,1,1,2,3,4,4,5,1,2]
>>> [i for i, j in zip_longest(my_list, my_list[1:]) if i!=j]
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 1, 2]
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