123

Input: Given an array of n elements which contains elements from 0 to n-1, with any of these numbers appearing any number of times.

Goal : To find these repeating numbers in O(n) and using only constant memory space.

For example, let n be 7 and array be {1, 2, 3, 1, 3, 0, 6}, the answer should be 1 & 3. I checked similar questions here but the answers used some data structures like HashSet etc.

Any efficient algorithm for the same?

0

14 Answers 14

167

This is what I came up with, which doesn't require the additional sign bit:

for i := 0 to n - 1
    while A[A[i]] != A[i] 
        swap(A[i], A[A[i]])
    end while
end for

for i := 0 to n - 1
    if A[i] != i then 
        print A[i]
    end if
end for

The first loop permutes the array so that if element x is present at least once, then one of those entries will be at position A[x].

Note that it may not look O(n) at first blush, but it is - although it has a nested loop, it still runs in O(N) time. A swap only occurs if there is an i such that A[i] != i, and each swap sets at least one element such that A[i] == i, where that wasn't true before. This means that the total number of swaps (and thus the total number of executions of the while loop body) is at most N-1.

The second loop prints the values of x for which A[x] doesn't equal x - since the first loop guarantees that if x exists at least once in the array, one of those instances will be at A[x], this means that it prints those values of x which are not present in the array.

(Ideone link so you can play with it)

22
  • 12
    @arasmussen: Yeah. I came up with a broken version first, though. The contraints of the problem give a bit of a clue to the solution - the fact that every valid array value is also a valid array index hints at a[a[i]], and the O(1) space constraint hints at the swap() operation being key. – caf Apr 21 '11 at 5:26
  • 2
    @caf : Please run your code with the array as {3,4,5,3,4} it fails. – NirmalGeo Apr 21 '11 at 5:54
  • 7
    @NirmalGeo: That is not a valid input, because 5 is not in the range 0..N-1 (N in this case being 5). – caf Apr 21 '11 at 5:55
  • 2
    @caf the output for {1,2,3,1,3,0,0,0,0,6} is 3 1 0 0 0 or in any case where repetition is more than 2. Is it correct o/p ? – Terminal Apr 21 '11 at 6:42
  • 3
    This is amazing! I've seen a number of variants on this question, usually more constrained, and this is the most general way to solve it that I've seen. I'll simply mention that changing the print statement to print i turns this into a solution to stackoverflow.com/questions/5249985/… and (assuming the "bag" is a modifiable array) Qk of stackoverflow.com/questions/3492302/…. – j_random_hacker Apr 22 '11 at 0:38
37

caf's brilliant answer prints each number that appears k times in the array k-1 times. That's useful behaviour, but the question arguably calls for each duplicate to be printed once only, and he alludes to the possibility of doing this without blowing the linear time/constant space bounds. This can be done by replacing his second loop with the following pseudocode:

for (i = 0; i < N; ++i) {
    if (A[i] != i && A[A[i]] == A[i]) {
        print A[i];
        A[A[i]] = i;
    }
}

This exploits the property that after the first loop runs, if any value m appears more than once, then one of those appearances is guaranteed to be in the correct position, namely A[m]. If we are careful we can use that "home" location to store information about whether any duplicates have been printed yet or not.

In caf's version, as we went through the array, A[i] != i implied that A[i] is a duplicate. In my version, I rely on a slightly different invariant: that A[i] != i && A[A[i]] == A[i] implies that A[i] is a duplicate that we haven't seen before. (If you drop the "that we haven't seen before" part, the rest can be seen to be implied by the truth of caf's invariant, and the guarantee that all duplicates have some copy in a home location.) This property holds at the outset (after caf's 1st loop finishes) and I show below that it's maintained after each step.

As we go through the array, success on the A[i] != i part of the test implies that A[i] could be a duplicate that hasn't been seen before. If we haven't seen it before, then we expect A[i]'s home location to point to itself -- that's what's tested for by the second half of the if condition. If that's the case, we print it and alter the home location to point back to this first found duplicate, creating a 2-step "cycle".

To see that this operation doesn't alter our invariant, suppose m = A[i] for a particular position i satisfying A[i] != i && A[A[i]] == A[i]. It's obvious that the change we make (A[A[i]] = i) will work to prevent other non-home occurrences of m from being output as duplicates by causing the 2nd half of their if conditions to fail, but will it work when i arrives at the home location, m? Yes it will, because now, even though at this new i we find that the 1st half of the if condition, A[i] != i, is true, the 2nd half tests whether the location it points to is a home location and finds that it isn't. In this situation we no longer know whether m or A[m] was the duplicate value, but we know that either way, it has already been reported, because these 2-cycles are guaranteed not to appear in the result of caf's 1st loop. (Note that if m != A[m] then exactly one of m and A[m] occurs more than once, and the other does not occur at all.)

1
  • 2
    Yes, that's very similar to that which I came up with. It's interesting how an identical first loop is useful for several different problems, just with a different printing loop. – caf Apr 22 '11 at 4:17
25

Here is the pseudocode

for i <- 0 to n-1:
   if (A[abs(A[i])]) >= 0 :
       (A[abs(A[i])]) = -(A[abs(A[i])])
   else
      print i
end for

Sample code in C++

14
  • 3
    Very clever - encoding the answer in the sign bit of the indexed entry! – holtavolt Apr 21 '11 at 3:14
  • 3
    @sashang : It can't be. Check out the problem specification. "Given an array of n elements which contains elements from 0 to n-1" – Prasoon Saurav Apr 21 '11 at 3:15
  • 5
    This won't detect duplicate 0s, and will spot the same number as being a duplicate multiple times. – Null Set Apr 21 '11 at 3:15
  • 1
    @Null Set: You can just replace - with ~ for the zero issue. – user541686 Apr 21 '11 at 3:16
  • 28
    This may be the answer that the problem is driving at, but technically it uses O(n) hidden space - the n sign bits. If the array is defined such that each element can only hold values between 0 and n-1, then it obviously does not work. – caf Apr 21 '11 at 3:21
2

For relatively small N we can use div/mod operations

n.times do |i|
  e = a[i]%n
  a[e] += n
end

n.times do |i| 
  count = a[i]/n
  puts i if count > 1
end

Not C/C++ but anyway

http://ideone.com/GRZPI

1
  • +1 Nice solution. Stopping adding n to an entry after two times will accommodate larger n. – Apshir Dec 21 '11 at 6:56
1

Not really pretty but at least it's easy to see the O(N) and O(1) properties. Basically we scan the array and, for each number we see if the corresponding position has been flagged already-seen-once (N) or already-seen-multiple-times (N+1). If it is flagged already-seen-once, we print it and flag it already-seen-multiple-times. If it is not flagged, we flag it already-seen-once and we move the original value of the corresponding index to the current position (flagging is a destructive operation).

for (i=0; i<a.length; i++) {
  value = a[i];
  if (value >= N)
    continue;
  if (a[value] == N)  {
    a[value] = N+1; 
    print value;
  } else if (a[value] < N) {
    if (value > i)
      a[i--] = a[value];
    a[value] = N;
  }
}

or, better yet (faster, despite the double loop):

for (i=0; i<a.length; i++) {
  value = a[i];
  while (value < N) {
    if (a[value] == N)  {
      a[value] = N+1; 
      print value;
      value = N;
    } else if (a[value] < N) {
      newvalue = value > i ? a[value] : N;
      a[value] = N;
      value = newvalue;
    }
  }
}
1
  • 1
    +1, it works nicely, but it took a bit of thought to figure out exactly why if (value > i) a[i--] = a[value]; works: if value <= i then we have already processed the value at a[value] and can overwrite it safely. Also I wouldn't say the O(N) nature is obvious! Spelling it out: The main loop runs N times, plus however many times the a[i--] = a[value]; line runs. That line can only run if a[value] < N, and each time it runs, immediately afterwards an array value that was not already N is set to N, so it can run at most N times, for a total of at most 2N loop iterations. – j_random_hacker Jul 14 '12 at 17:23
0

One solution in C is:

#include <stdio.h>

int finddup(int *arr,int len)
{
    int i;
    printf("Duplicate Elements ::");
    for(i = 0; i < len; i++)
    {
        if(arr[abs(arr[i])] > 0)
          arr[abs(arr[i])] = -arr[abs(arr[i])];
        else if(arr[abs(arr[i])] == 0)
        {
             arr[abs(arr[i])] = - len ;
        }
        else
          printf("%d ", abs(arr[i]));
    }

}
int main()
{   
    int arr1[]={0,1,1,2,2,0,2,0,0,5};
    finddup(arr1,sizeof(arr1)/sizeof(arr1[0]));
    return 0;
}

It is O(n) time and O(1) space complexity.

2
  • 2
    The space complexity of this is O(N), because it uses N additional sign bits. The algorithm should work under the assumption that the array element type can only hold numbers from 0 to N-1. – caf Sep 12 '12 at 10:55
  • yes that true but for asked algo its perfect as they wanted the algo for numbers 0 to n-1 only and also i checked your solution its going above O(n) so i thought of this – Anshul garg Sep 12 '12 at 11:02
0

Let's assume that we present this array as a uni-directional graph data structure - each number is a vertex and its index in the array points to another vertex forming an edge of the graph.

For even more simplicity we have indices 0 to n-1 and range of number from 0..n-1. e.g.

   0  1  2  3  4 
 a[3, 2, 4, 3, 1]

0(3) --> 3(3) is a cycle.

Answer: Just traverse the array relying on indices. if a[x] = a[y] then it's a cycle and thus duplicate. Skip to the next index and continue again and so forth until the end of of an array. Complexity: O(n) time and O(1) space.

2
  • Hmm. I can't see the nice link between cycles and duplicates. Consider array = [1, 0]: element s 0 and 1 cycle, but aren't duplicates. What you could deduce, is that if you use this traversal method and reach a cycle, that the last element before the cycle is a duplicate, eg: array = [1, 2, 3, 4, 2]. This creates a few new problems. How would you detect a cycle without using extra memory and time. – Elliott Oct 9 '20 at 11:23
  • Secondly, even if you could detect when you've cycled back in constant time and space, what about arrays like this: array = [1, 2, ...., n - 1, 0, 0] (the single duplicate of the 0 value). Going through the cycles for each element would take O(n) time and so all-up it would be O(n^2) time. – Elliott Oct 9 '20 at 11:27
0

Check out the explanation here https://youtu.be/qJ_Y7pKP0e4

code here https://github.com/TechieExpress/DataStructures/blob/main/findDuplicates

Code snippet:

/**
*
* @author techieExpress
*
* You are given a list of n-1 integers and these integers are in the range * of 1 to n.
* Input: Given an array of n elements which contains elements 
* from 0 to n-1, with any of these numbers appearing any number of times.
* 
* Goal: To find these repeating numbers in O(n) and using only constant  * * memory space.
**/

public class findDuplicates {
    
    
    public static void main(String args[])
    {
        int arr[] = { 2,1,1,2 };
  
        for (int i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
            arr[arr[i] % arr.length]
                = arr[arr[i] % arr.length]
                  + arr.length;
        }
        System.out.println("The repeating elements are : ");
        for (int i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
            
            //System.out.print(numRay[i]);
            if (arr[i] >= arr.length * 2) {
                System.out.println(i + " ");
                arr[i]=arr[i]%arr.length;
            }
        }
    }

}
3
  • Function comment header and int arr[] = { 2,1,1,2 }; are contradictory – shubham Apr 20 at 11:56
  • @shubham sorry? did not get you. – user3359003 Apr 21 at 11:44
  • 1
    @shubham thanks for pointing out, only the comments were incorrect, the solution is for the question asked above, corrected the comments. – user3359003 Apr 21 at 11:47
-1

A tiny python code to demonstrate caf's method above:

a = [3, 1, 1, 0, 4, 4, 6] 
n = len(a)
for i in range(0,n):
    if a[ a[i] ] != a[i]: a[a[i]], a[i] = a[i], a[a[i]]
for i in range(0,n):
    if a[i] != i: print( a[i] )
1
  • 1
    Note that the swap might have to happen more than once for a single i value - note the while in my answer. – caf Dec 5 '11 at 12:35
-1

Algorithm can be readily seen in the following C function. Retrieving original array, although not required, will be possible taking each entry modulo n.

void print_repeats(unsigned a[], unsigned n)
{
    unsigned i, _2n = 2*n;
    for(i = 0; i < n; ++i) if(a[a[i] % n] < _2n) a[a[i] % n] += n;
    for(i = 0; i < n; ++i) if(a[i] >= _2n) printf("%u ", i);
    putchar('\n');
}

Ideone Link for testing.

1
  • 1
    I'm afraid this is technically "cheating", since working with numbers up to 2*n requires an extra 1 bit of storage space per array entry over what is required to store the original numbers. In fact you need closer to log2(3) = 1.58 extra bits per entry, because you're storing numbers up to 3*n-1. – j_random_hacker Jul 14 '12 at 17:31
-1
static void findrepeat()
{
    int[] arr = new int[7] {0,2,1,0,0,4,4};

    for (int i = 0; i < arr.Length; i++)
    {
        if (i != arr[i])
        {
            if (arr[i] == arr[arr[i]])
            {
                Console.WriteLine(arr[i] + "!!!");
            }

            int t = arr[i];
            arr[i] = arr[arr[i]];
            arr[t] = t;
        }
    }

    for (int j = 0; j < arr.Length; j++)
    {
        Console.Write(arr[j] + " ");
    }
    Console.WriteLine();

    for (int j = 0; j < arr.Length; j++)
    {
        if (j == arr[j])
        {
            arr[j] = 1;
        }
        else
        {
            arr[arr[j]]++;
            arr[j] = 0;
        }
    }

    for (int j = 0; j < arr.Length; j++)
    {
        Console.Write(arr[j] + " ");
    }
    Console.WriteLine();
}
1
  • This is basically Caf's answer, but with bugs and no explanations. – Elliott Oct 9 '20 at 11:49
-1

I have created one sample playground app in swift for finding duplicates in 0(n) time complexity and constant extra space. Please check the url Finding Duplicates

IMP Above solution worked when an array contains elements from 0 to n-1 , with any of these numbers appearing any number of times.

1
  • This uses O(n)space because it assumes that you have spare bits available to add indices to the elements. Check out Caf's answer. – Elliott Oct 9 '20 at 11:46
-1
private static void printRepeating(int arr[], int size) {
        int i = 0;
        int j = 1;
        while (i < (size - 1)) {
            if (arr[i] == arr[j]) {
                System.out.println(arr[i] + " repeated at index " + j);
                j = size;
            }
            j++;
            if (j >= (size - 1)) {
                i++;
                j = i + 1;
            }
        }

    }
3
  • The above solution will achieve the same in time complexity of O(n) and constant space. – user12704811 Jan 13 '20 at 14:17
  • 3
    Thank you for this code snippet, which might provide some limited short-term help. A proper explanation would greatly improve its long-term value by showing why this is a good solution to the problem, and would make it more useful to future readers with other, similar questions. Please edit your answer to add some explanation, including the assumptions you've made. – Toby Speight Jan 13 '20 at 17:21
  • 4
    BTW, the time complexity seems to be O(n²) here - hiding the inner loop doesn't change that. – Toby Speight Jan 13 '20 at 17:23
-3

If the array is not too large this solution is simpler, It creates another array of same size for ticking.

1 Create a bitmap/array of same size as your input array

 int check_list[SIZE_OF_INPUT];
 for(n elements in checklist)
     check_list[i]=0;    //initialize to zero

2 scan your input array and increment its count in the above array

for(i=0;i<n;i++) // every element in input array
{
  check_list[a[i]]++; //increment its count  
}  

3 Now scan the check_list array and print the duplicate either once or as many times they have been duplicated

for(i=0;i<n;i++)
{

    if(check_list[i]>1) // appeared as duplicate
    {
        printf(" ",i);  
    }
}

Of course it takes twice the space consumed by solution given above ,but time efficiency is O(2n) which is basically O(n).

4
  • oops ...! didnt notice that ... my bad . – Deepthought Jul 7 '12 at 14:02
  • @nikhil how is it O(1)?. My array check_list grows linearly as the size of input grows,so how is it O(1) if so what are the heuristics you are using to call it O(1). – Deepthought Jul 8 '12 at 15:09
  • For a given input you need constant space, isn't that O(1)? I could well be wrong :) – nikhil Jul 8 '12 at 17:40
  • My solution needs more space as the input grows. The efficiency (space/time) of an algorithm in not measured for a particular input.(In such case time efficiency of every searching algorithm would be constant i.e element found in the 1st index where we searched).Its measured for any input, thats the reason why we have best case ,worst case and average case. – Deepthought Jul 8 '12 at 18:11

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