1

Question

Should the script block of Invoke-Command, when run with a PSSession, always run on the remote computer?

Context

I ran the below powershell against a list of servers:

Clear-Host
$cred = get-credential 'myDomain\myUsername'
$psSessions = New-PSSession -ComputerName @(1..10 | %{'myServer{0:00}' -f $_}) -Credential $cred
Invoke-Command -Session $psSessions -ScriptBlock {
    Get-Item -Path 'HKLM:\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Lsa\Kerberos\Parameters' 
} | Sort-Object PSComputerName
# $psSessions  | Remove-PSSession

This returned:

    Hive: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Lsa\Kerberos


Name                           Property                   PSComputerName
----                           --------                   --------------
Parameters                     MaxPacketSize : 1          myServer01
                               MaxTokenSize  : 65535
Parameters                     MaxPacketSize : 1          myServer02
                               MaxTokenSize  : 65535
Parameters                     MaxPacketSize : 1          myServer03
                               MaxTokenSize  : 65535
Parameters                     MaxPacketSize : 1          myServer04
                               MaxTokenSize  : 65535
Parameters                     MaxPacketSize : 1          myServer05
                               MaxTokenSize  : 65535
Parameters                     MaxPacketSize : 1          myServer06
                               MaxTokenSize  : 65535
Parameters                     MaxPacketSize : 1          myServer07
                               MaxTokenSize  : 65535
Parameters                     MaxPacketSize : 1          myServer08
                               MaxTokenSize  : 65535
Parameters                     MaxPacketSize : 1          myServer09
                               MaxTokenSize  : 65535
Parameters                     MaxPacketSize : 1          myServer10
                               MaxTokenSize  : 65535

All looks good; onlyl I'd not expected to see these values / I was running this as a quick sense check before setting the values on these servers to ensure I didn't overwrite anything.

I had a quick look at one of the servers using regedit; and found that MaxTokenSize and MaxPacketSize did not exist.

I then amended the command to use Get-ItemProperty instead of Get-Item:

Invoke-Command -Session $psSessions -ScriptBlock {
    Get-ItemProperty -Path 'HKLM:\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Lsa\Kerberos\Parameters' -Name 'MaxTokenSize'
} | Sort-Object PSComputerName

This time I got 10 errors:

Property MaxTokenSize does not exist at path HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Lsa\Kerberos\Parameters.
    + CategoryInfo          : InvalidArgument: (MaxTokenSize:String) [Get-ItemProperty], PSArgumentException
    + FullyQualifiedErrorId : System.Management.Automation.PSArgumentException,Microsoft.PowerShell.Commands.GetItemPropertyCommand
    + PSComputerName        : myServer01
# ... (and the same for the other 9 servers, with only PSComputerName changing)

Regarding where the values that were returned came from... they're from my local machine. Amending my local registry entries and rerunning the original command showed all "servers" as having the new value.

I'm guessing this is a bug; but because I've not played with PSSessions much so far wanted to check here in case it's an issue with my understanding / usage of these commands, or if there are known gotchas to watch out for when using PSSessions.

  • 2
    Pipe it to fl * or ft * so it doesn't use the format file to display the registry keys. The format file runs get-itemproperty locally to try to display the properties. – js2010 Aug 7 at 19:17
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    What @js2010 said - the Registry provider adds a set of dynamic properties that reference the absolute path to the provider item on the source computer - which the formatting layer in your local session then execute just-in-time for your console to format and render it, resulting in the screen buffer actually showing the values fetched from your local machine after Invoke-Command has returned – Mathias R. Jessen Aug 7 at 20:01
  • 1
    Wow; thank-you - did not expect that (though have seen something similar before where the format provider does more than just format: stackoverflow.com/a/31570260/361842 - which Mathias answered then too). – JohnLBevan Aug 7 at 20:10
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    @JohnLBevan: While the linked answer is conceptually related, the problems there stem from ETS (extended type system) definitions, not formatting definitions, as in the case at hand. – mklement0 Aug 10 at 22:36
1

Pipe it to fl * or ft * so it doesn't use the format file to display the registry keys. The format file runs get-itemproperty locally to try to display the properties.

From the bottom of $PSHOME\Registry.format.ps1xml for type Microsoft.Win32.RegistryKey:

<ScriptBlock>
  $result = (Get-ItemProperty -LiteralPath $_.PSPath |
      Select * -Exclude PSPath,PSParentPath,PSChildName,PSDrive,PsProvider |
      Format-List | Out-String | Sort).Trim()
  $result = $result.Substring(0, [Math]::Min($result.Length, 5000) )
  if($result.Length -eq 5000) { $result += "..." }
  $result
</ScriptBlock>
  • Good sleuthing; while the workarounds (Format-List * and Format-Table *) avoid the inapplicable display of local data, they're limited in that you'll only see registry value names, not also data. – mklement0 Aug 10 at 20:32
  • On a meta note: Your answer is helpful, but so terse that only advanced PowerShell users will understand it. I had edited your answer intending to improve it with a more detailed explanation and better formatting. You quietly rolled back the entire edit (which I might never have noticed if I hadn't come back). Help me understand, to prevent future wasted effort: Are you fundamentally opposed to others editing your posts? If not, I'm curious in what way you thought the changes weren't an improvement (so I can adjust future edits, if any) – mklement0 Aug 10 at 20:33
1

tl;dr:

  • The root cause is a bug in the formatting instructions for registry keys (as of Windows PowerShell 5.1.18362.125 and PowerShell Core 7.0.0-preview.2) leading to the unexpected mix of remote and local information - see this GitHub issue.

  • The best workaround is to simply use Get-ItemProperty (without a -Name argument) instead of Get-Item.


Mathias R. Jessen has provided the crucial pointer in a comment on the question, and js2010's answer provides a limited workaround and a pointer to the root cause, but it's worth providing more background information:

PowerShell comes with formatting instructions for type Microsoft.Win32.RegistryKey, as output by Get-Item with a registry path.

These formatting instructions define a calculated column named Property for the default (tabular) view, which helpfully shows a summary of the output registry key's values, which involves accessing the registry again, using Get-ItemProperty as shown in js2010's answer.

However, that behind-the-scenes Get-ItemProperty call always accesses the local registry - even when the keys were retrieved from a different machine, via PowerShell remoting, so you'll end up with a spurious mix of remote and local information.

Note that, technically, when Get-Item is run remotely, what you receive locally is an approximation of the original Microsoft.Win32.RegistryKey object, due to the serialization and deserialization involved in remoting. This approximation is a custom object with static copies of the original object's property values, and its (simulated) type name is Deserialized.Microsoft.Win32.RegistryKey - note the prefix.

PowerShell applies formatting instructions based on the full type name of output objects, but in the absence of a specific instructions or a given Deserialized.<originalTypeName> type, PowerShell applies the instructions for <originalTypeName>, which is what causes the problems here.

A - cumbersome, but edition-agnostic[1] - way to see the problematic formatting instruction is to run the following command:

(Get-FormatData Microsoft.Win32.RegistryKey -PowerShellVersion $PSVersionTable.PSVersion).FormatViewDefinition.Control | % {
  $colNames = $_.Headers.Label
  $colValues = $_.Rows.Columns.DisplayEntry.Value
  foreach ($i in 0..($colNames.Count-1)) {
     [pscustomobject] @{
       ColumnName = $colNames[$i]
       ColumnValue = $colValues[$i]
     }
  }
} | Format-Table -Wrap

This yields the column names and definitions for the table view:


ColumnName ColumnValue                                                                                                                   
---------- -----------                                                                                                                   
Name       PSChildName                                                                                                                   
Property                                                                                                                                 
                $result = (Get-ItemProperty -LiteralPath $_.PSPath |                                        
                    Select * -Exclude PSPath,PSParentPath,PSChildName,PSDrive,PsProvider |                  
                    Format-List | Out-String | Sort).Trim()                                                 
                $result = $result.Substring(0, [Math]::Min($result.Length, 5000) )                          
                if($result.Length -eq 5000) { $result += "..." }                                            
                $result                                                                                     


The workaround suggested in js2010's answer - piping to Format-Table * or Format-List * is effective in the sense that it prevents the inapplicable local information from being displayed: by specifying properties explicitly (even by wildcard pattern *), only those properties are displayed on output - not also the flawed calculated column.

However, while the true Property property of the output objects provides access to the value names in the registry key at hand, it doesn't provide the actual data, the way that the calculated Property column does.

By contrast, using Get-ItemProperty without a -Name argument in lieu of Get-Item as a workaround returns both value names and data (correctly even when remoting) and even does so without restrictions (whereas Get-Item limits output to 5000 chars.)

The output format will be slightly different, but all the information is there.


[1] That is, the command works also in PowerShell Core, where the built-in formatting instructions are no longer maintained as external *.format.ps1xl files and are instead compiled into the executable.

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