29

I'm trying to find out what is practical difference between these two approaches. For example:

struct PrimaryLabel: ViewModifier {
    func body(content: Content) -> some View {
        content
            .padding()
            .background(Color.black)
            .foregroundColor(Color.white)
            .font(.largeTitle)
            .cornerRadius(10)
    }
}

extension View {
    func makePrimaryLabel() -> some View {
        self
            .padding()
            .background(Color.black)
            .foregroundColor(Color.white)
            .font(.largeTitle)
            .cornerRadius(10)
    }
}

Then we can use all of them following way:

Text(tech.title)
    .modifier(PrimaryLabel())
Text(tech.title)
    .makePrimaryLabel()
ModifiedContent(
    content: Text(tech.title),
    modifier: PrimaryLabel()
)
19

All of the approaches you mentioned are correct. The difference is how you use it and where you access it. Which one is better? is an opinion base question and you should take a look at clean code strategies and SOLID principles and etc to find what is the best practice for each case.

Since SwiftUI is very modifier chain base, The second option is the closest to the original modifiers. Also you can take arguments like the originals:

extension Text {
    enum Kind {
        case primary
        case secondary
    }

    func style(_ kind: Kind) -> some View {

        switch kind {
        case .primary:
            return self
                .padding()
                .background(Color.black)
                .foregroundColor(Color.white)
                .font(.largeTitle)
                .cornerRadius(10)

        case .secondary:
            return self
                .padding()
                .background(Color.blue)
                .foregroundColor(Color.red)
                .font(.largeTitle)
                .cornerRadius(20)
        }
    }
}

struct ContentView: View {
    @State var kind = Text.Kind.primary

    var body: some View {
        VStack {
        Text("Primary")
            .style(kind)
            Button(action: {
                self.kind = .secondary
            }) {
                Text("Change me to secondary")
            }
        }
    }
}

We should wait and see what is the BEST practices in new technologies like this. Anything we find now is just a GOOD practice.

7
  • As for me, extension looks good for almost all the cases I can imaging. That's the reason why I'm thinking ViewModifier+ModifiedContent are redundant. We can implement both this things with extensions and View structs. :) Aug 8 '19 at 12:02
  • As you say, Almost. Aug 8 '19 at 12:03
  • 8
    ViewModifier let you have @State variables, but View extensions do not.
    – kontiki
    Aug 8 '19 at 12:45
  • Extensions can never have stored variables. @States belongs to the view, not the modifier. Aug 8 '19 at 12:52
  • 2
    @MojtabaHosseini I know extensions can never have store variables. That was my point! But ViewModifier can have them, I posted an example.
    – kontiki
    Aug 8 '19 at 13:01
11

I usually prefer extensions, as they get you a more readable code and they are generally shorter to write. In fact I am currently working on an article with some tips. I finished an article about View extensions, available here.

However, there are differences. At least one. With ViewModifier you can have @State variables, but not with View extensions. Here's an example:

struct ContentView: View {
    var body: some View {
        VStack {
            Text("Hello, how are you?").modifier(ColorChangeOnTap())
        }
    }
}

struct ColorChangeOnTap: ViewModifier {
    @State private var tapped: Bool = false

    func body(content: Content) -> some View {
        return content.foregroundColor(tapped ? .red : .blue).onTapGesture {
            self.tapped.toggle()
        }
    }
}
5
  • Why about creating a view then struct ColorChangeView: View? Aug 8 '19 at 12:56
  • It is just an example. Of course this case does not need it. Its only purpose is showing you that @State variables are permitted inside a ViewModifier. Wasn't the original question what's the difference between View extensions and ViewModifier? There you have one ;-)
    – kontiki
    Aug 8 '19 at 13:00
  • 1
    Good point. But I'm just trying to find out why Apple developers created such a structure if it doesn't provide any opaque advantages. :) Aug 8 '19 at 13:04
  • 1
    Well, consider the example I posted. How would you write that logic in a way that can be applied to different views (without having to rewrite the same code for each view)? You cannot use View extensions, because you cannot keep track of an internal state. You cannot use a custom View, because you cannot reuse the logic to apply it to other views. You can only use a ViewModifier. (cont'd)
    – kontiki
    Aug 8 '19 at 13:08
  • 1
    As for what's the purpose of View extensions? Well probably two reasons: 1. View extensions are not something specific of SwiftUI. Extensions on any struct are part of the language. So how you prevent people from using them? And 2., view extensions look much nicer than modifier. So when given the option, I'll go for extensions ;-) Btw, nice question you posted!
    – kontiki
    Aug 8 '19 at 13:12
1

I believe the best approach is combining ViewModifiers and View extension. This will allow composition of @State within the ViewModifier and convenience of View extension.

struct PrimaryLabel: ViewModifier {
    func body(content: Content) -> some View {
        content
            .padding()
            .background(Color.black)
            .foregroundColor(Color.white)
            .font(.largeTitle)
            .cornerRadius(10)
    }
}

extension View {
    func makePrimaryLabel() -> some View {
        ModifiedContent(content: self, modifier: PrimaryLabel())
    }
}

Usage

Text(tech.title)
    .makePrimaryLabel()

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