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i am working on adding new languages support for my mobile platform.I have to add entry for each language in several files,so i thought to do it using perl.To automate this process,i am feeling problem in how to match multi-line patterns in perl. Here is my scenario :

const mmi_imeres_mode_details_struct g_ime_mode_array_int[] =
{      
     {
     INPUT_MODE_NONE,
     0,
     0,
     0,
     0,
     0,
     0
     },
    {
     INPUT_MODE_MULTITAP_LOWERCASE_ABC,
     STR_INPUT_METHOD_MENU_MULTITAP_abc,
     WGUI_IME_MULTITAP_LOWERCASE_ABC_IMG,
     INPUT_MODE_DEFAULT_ALTERNATE_METHOD,
     MMI_IME_ALL_EDITORS | MMI_IME_ENGLISH_ONLY_MODE | MMI_IME_ALPHABETIC | MMI_IME_LOWERCASE,
     MMI_IMM_WRITING_LANGUAGE_ENGLISH,
     "en-US"
     },

}

First i had problem because in perl file is read one line at a time.so i first converted my file stream in to single variable.

my $newstr = '';
open (FH, "$filename") || die "Could not open file.\n";
while(<FH>)
{
    $newstr = $newstr.$_;

}  

No can someone help me how to search for text within { } , if it is a multi-line pattern.please reply soon...:)

3

First, there's a better idiom for slurping a file:

my $newstr;
{
    open my $fh, '<', $filename or die "Could not open file $filename.\n$!\n";
    local $/ = undef;
    $newstr = <$fh>;
}

Next, you can set the /s modifier on your regexp, which treats the string as a single line by allowing '.' (dot) to match anything including newlines. But even that's not really necessary since you won't be using 'dot' in your regexp anyway.....

while(  
    $newstr =~ m/
        {        # Match the opening bracket.
        ([^}]*)  # Capture any number of characters that exclude '}'
        }        # Match the closing bracket.
    /gx          # Use /g for multiple matches, and /x for readability.
) {
    print "$1\n";
}

Another solution would be to set your input record separator, $/, to '}'. That way you're reading the file in as chunks that end with a closing bracket. Nifty trick.

  • thnx a lot let me try .. – algo-geeks Apr 21 '11 at 9:28
  • You know, I'm not real happy with my previous answer. While it's technically correct, it doesn't consider the greater task at hand. You're parsing nested tags. For that, use a parsing module; don't try to roll your own regexp solution. It gets complex really fast. Instead, use Parse::RecDescent, or Parse::RecDescent::Simple for better accuracy, fewer headaches, and better sleep at night. – DavidO Apr 21 '11 at 9:42
  • yeah you are right,in long term it is not beneficial but cpan is quite vast to use.But i will try to..thnx for ur suggestion..really helpful...:) – algo-geeks Apr 21 '11 at 9:57
  • Also have a look at Regexp::Grammars. – Alan Haggai Alavi Apr 21 '11 at 11:39

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