1

I am writing a piece of middleware (maybe I want a scoped service??), I guess my plan is to have some kind of multi-tenant scenario.

If for example, I have 2 domains that respond on this service:

  • www.domain1.com
  • www.domain2.com

I want to capture the request when it starts, look at the host name that is being used and then set some other object to be available through Dependency Injection for everything further up the pipeline.

It seems that middleware should be the right way to achieve this, but not sure how to do the final step.

My options seem to be:

Middleware

  • Register Singleton service to access database
  • Register early to be the first item of middleware to capture the request.
    • Analyse Request Object and build custom configuration object
    • Add custom configuration as a scoped object to the DI container for use by other services

Service

  • Register Singleton service to access database
  • Register Singleton service for IHttpContextAccessor
  • Register Scoped? Service - to do equivalent of middleware
    • Analyse the request object and build custom configuration object
    • Register custom object as new scoped object in the DI container

My assumption is that the Service is able to register the custom scoped object as it is still within the ConfigureServices method of the startup.cs

However, with middleware it is initialised through the Configure method by which point the DI container has already been built?

2

You can use the factory-overload of AddScoped for the service you want to be different per tenant/request. Here's an example:

services.AddScoped<IServiceForTenant>(sp =>
{
    var httpContextAccessor = sp.GetRequiredService<IHttpContextAccessor>();
    var serviceForTenant = new ServiceForTenant();

    // TODO: Use httpContextAcccessor.HttpContext to configure serviceForTenant.

    return serviceForTenant;
});

For each request that comes in to your ASP.NET Core application, the code above will run when you first request IServiceForTenant in e.g. a controller. At this point, your code can read from IHttpContextAccessor.HttpContext and make whatever decisions it needs in order to create the implementation instance for IServiceForTenant. This same instance will then be used for the rest of the request (i.e. further up the pipeline).

The argument passed into AddScoped is Func<IServiceProvider, T>. All you need to provide here is a delegate of some kind, which could be done in one of many ways. Here's some examples:

  1. You could just wrap the call into its own extension method, like this:

    public static void AddServiceForTenant(this IServiceCollection services)
    {
        services.AddScoped<IServiceForTenant>(sp =>
        {
            // ...
        });
    }
    

    In ConfigureServices:

    services.AddServiceForTenant();
    
  2. Use a class with a static method:

    public static class ServiceForTenantFactory
    {
        public static ITenantForService Create(IServiceProvider sp)
        {
            // ...
        }
    }
    

    In ConfigureServices:

    services.AddScoped(ServiceForTenantFactory.Create);
    
  3. Use a class with an instance method:

    public class ServiceForTenantFactory
    {
        public ITenantForService Create(HttpContext httpContext)
        {
            // ...
        }
    }
    

    In ConfigureServices:

    services.AddScoped(sp =>
    {
        var httpContextAccessor = sp.GetRequiredService<IHttpContextAccessor>();
        var serviceForTenantFactory = new ServiceForTenantFactory(); // Or use DI.
    
        return serviceForTenantFactory.Create(httpContextAccessor.HttpContext);
    });
    

    This last option is the most flexible, as you could even resolve ServiceForTenantFactory itself from DI and it can have its own dependencies, etc. Note also that Create here takes the HttpContext directly (as an example).

As I've already said, there are yet more options than the three of shown, but this should be a good base to work with.

  • 1
    You could have a separate class with a method that has the ITenantService (IServiceProvider) signature and pass that in to AddScoped. As a static would be easiest but if you prefer an instance method, that would be possible too. I can update the answer later with some examples if that would help. – Kirk Larkin Aug 9 '19 at 13:13

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