2

Originating from here, what would be the C# equivalent to this code? I think the ** is the exponent, but I don't know what [i] does.

def sequence(v, p, column):
    subsequence = []
    for i in range(v):
        subsequence += [i] * v**(p - column)
    return subsequence * v**(column - 1)
5
  • [i] creates a python list containing i which allows you to use the += operator to append to the subsequence list. Aug 9, 2019 at 15:41
  • This is sort of beside the point, but are you sure this code is actually a good way to solve the original problem in the other thread? It generates the desired sequence column-wise, which seems counterintuitive and requires more work to join the thing together and think about how many columns there are.
    – ggorlen
    Aug 9, 2019 at 15:57
  • @ggorlen, no, but it's the best I could find. I'd be grateful to learn of other options if you know of any.
    – adam0101
    Aug 9, 2019 at 16:01
  • 1
    I'll probably add an answer to the other thread--I'm not satisfied with the one that's there. I like the problem, though.
    – ggorlen
    Aug 9, 2019 at 16:03
  • OK, I added a solution in the other thread. I wrote it in Python but I'll translate it to C# momentarily--the code is a lot more straightforward than the existing answer, I hope.
    – ggorlen
    Aug 9, 2019 at 16:19

1 Answer 1

6

One could do:

public static List<int> sequence(int v, int p, int column) {
  var subsequence = new List<int>();
  for (int i = 0; i < v; i++) {
    int limit = (int)Math.Pow(v, p - column);
    for (int j = 0; j < limit; j++)
      subsequence.Add(i);
  }

  var true_sequence = new List<int>();
  for (int k = 0; k < (int)Math.Pow(v, column - 1); k++)
    true_sequence.AddRange(subsequence);

  return true_sequence;
}

[i] * <number> is notation for "repeat this list <number> times and put the result in a new list". [i] is just a list containing only the number i.

Edit: Explanation

for i in range(v):

translates well to:

for (int i = 0; i < v; i++) {
subsequence += [i] * v**(p - column)

This is a bit complicated, but what it essentially says is "take v, take it to the power of (p - column), and then add that number of i to subsequence". This is close to that:

int limit = Math.Pow(v, p - column);
for (int j = 0; j < limit; j++)
  subsequence.Add(i);
return subsequence * v**(column - 1)

Now what this says is "take v to the power of (column - 1), and return a list containing that many instances of subsequence." That's what the rest of the code in the function does: takes Math.Pow(v, column - 1) subsequences, adds them all to a list, and returns said list.

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