25

How to detect device rotation in SwiftUI and re-draw view components?

I have a @State variable initialized to the value of UIScreen.main.bounds.width when the first appears. But this value doesn't change when the device orientation changes. I need to redraw all components when the user changes the device orientation.

17 Answers 17

25

Here‘s an idiomatic SwiftUI implementation based on a notification publisher:

struct ContentView: View {
    
    @State var orientation = UIDevice.current.orientation

    let orientationChanged = NotificationCenter.default.publisher(for: UIDevice.orientationDidChangeNotification)
        .makeConnectable()
        .autoconnect()

    var body: some View {
        Group {
            if orientation.isLandscape {
                Text("LANDSCAPE")
            } else {
                Text("PORTRAIT")
            }
        }.onReceive(orientationChanged) { _ in
            self.orientation = UIDevice.current.orientation
        }
    }
}

The output of the publisher (not used above, therefor _ as the block parameter) also contains the key "UIDeviceOrientationRotateAnimatedUserInfoKey" in its userInfo property if you need to know if the rotation should be animated.

6
  • Awesome. I bet Apple would support this as the best answer. Bet they make a built in attribute soon with this.
    – DaWiseguy
    Aug 20 '20 at 16:12
  • Just note that the device can be in landscape while the app is in portrait (for instance when an iPad runs the app in split screen). Dec 15 '20 at 21:59
  • 2
    This does work for me, however it doesn't seem to read the initial orientation of the device. Any ideas? Jan 20 at 15:44
  • @benpomeroy9 Maybe it helps to set orientation somewhere inside a onAppear block.
    – Koraktor
    Jan 30 at 9:06
  • 2
    same problem as @benpomeroy9: initial orientation is not read correctly. Trying to set it in init or onAppear doesn't help...
    – jmm
    Jul 7 at 19:58
17

@dfd provided two good options, I am adding a third one, which is the one I use.

In my case I subclass UIHostingController, and in function viewWillTransition, I post a custom notification.

Then, in my environment model I listen for such notification which can be then used in any view.

struct ContentView: View {
    @EnvironmentObject var model: Model

    var body: some View {
        Group {
            if model.landscape {
                Text("LANDSCAPE")
            } else {
                Text("PORTRAIT")
            }
        }
    }
}

In SceneDelegate.swift:

window.rootViewController = MyUIHostingController(rootView: ContentView().environmentObject(Model(isLandscape: windowScene.interfaceOrientation.isLandscape)))

My UIHostingController subclass:

extension Notification.Name {
    static let my_onViewWillTransition = Notification.Name("MainUIHostingController_viewWillTransition")
}

class MyUIHostingController<Content> : UIHostingController<Content> where Content : View {

    override func viewWillTransition(to size: CGSize, with coordinator: UIViewControllerTransitionCoordinator) {
        NotificationCenter.default.post(name: .my_onViewWillTransition, object: nil, userInfo: ["size": size])
        super.viewWillTransition(to: size, with: coordinator)
    }

}

And my model:

class Model: ObservableObject {
    @Published var landscape: Bool = false

    init(isLandscape: Bool) {
        self.landscape = isLandscape // Initial value
        NotificationCenter.default.addObserver(self, selector: #selector(onViewWillTransition(notification:)), name: .my_onViewWillTransition, object: nil)
    }

    @objc func onViewWillTransition(notification: Notification) {
        guard let size = notification.userInfo?["size"] as? CGSize else { return }

        landscape = size.width > size.height
    }
}
8
  • Nice! Particularly - and most important in my needs - working with width and height. One question? What is the advantage of this technique over using a GeometryReader? I'm sure there is something - and I've already learned a ton from your expertise. Looking forward to your reasoning on this!
    – dfd
    Aug 10 '19 at 13:38
  • Hi @dfd Nothing wrong with GeometryReader. I went for the other approach, because once I have the UIHostingController in place, I can throw some other stuff in there too (if I need to). Plus, now I have the landscape mode in my environment model, which means I can access and react to it easily, from any view, no matter where in the hierarchy.
    – kontiki
    Aug 10 '19 at 13:47
  • Hmmm. I think I'm missing something - and really want to understand! It's easy to turn rect into an environment variable in my example. I'm thinking what I'm missing is subclassing UIHostingController, which until now I've thought was to bring SwiftUI into UIKit. How are you using this subclass? What is it really doing? (BTW and for the record on SO, my answer is based on something you showed me in another answer. I've given you credit many times over the last 8 weeks and thought in this instance the question was... too different.)
    – dfd
    Aug 10 '19 at 13:51
  • It is just another approach. Not better, nor worse. Initially I though of using UIViewControllerRepresentable (as you also suggested), but then I though... Wait, I already have a UIViewController. Why not use it? And to be honest, I had other stuff in my UIHostingController (which is now gone), so adding the orientation logic was minimal effort.
    – kontiki
    Aug 10 '19 at 13:59
  • Trying to keep this on topic, so I just sent you an email. Let's say - and I may be inaccurate - that you have a SwiftUI stack and a UIKit stack. I thought that UIViewControllerRepresentable brought "processing" into the SwiftUI stack, and UIHostController the other way. Are you saying that UIHostController "reacts" in the SwiftUI stack?
    – dfd
    Aug 10 '19 at 14:09
15

There is an easier solution that the one provided by @kontiki, with no need for notifications or integration with UIKit.

In SceneDelegate.swift:

    func windowScene(_ windowScene: UIWindowScene, didUpdate previousCoordinateSpace: UICoordinateSpace, interfaceOrientation previousInterfaceOrientation: UIInterfaceOrientation, traitCollection previousTraitCollection: UITraitCollection) {
        model.environment.toggle()
    }

In Model.swift:

final class Model: ObservableObject {
    let objectWillChange = ObservableObjectPublisher()

    var environment: Bool = false { willSet { objectWillChange.send() } }
}

The net effect is that the views that depend on the @EnvironmentObject model will be redrawn each time the environment changes, be it rotation, changes in size, etc.

2
  • this is good, I didn't quite ended up using this exactly but the windowScence(...) is a good way to update any environment object and perform the update when necessary. thanks!
    – oracode
    Aug 14 '19 at 22:45
  • I used this solution, it worked perfectly and I find it quite clean. Make sure to import Combine at the top, and note that the environment object doesn’t need to be included in the body or called anywhere, it just needs to be declared within the view struct to trigger an update. Aug 1 '20 at 16:14
8

If someone is also interested in the initial device orientation. I did it as follows:

Device.swift

import Combine

final class Device: ObservableObject {
    @Published var isLandscape: Bool = false
}

SceneDelegate.swift

class SceneDelegate: UIResponder, UIWindowSceneDelegate {

    var window: UIWindow?

    // created instance
    let device = Device() // changed here

    func scene(_ scene: UIScene, willConnectTo session: UISceneSession, options connectionOptions: UIScene.ConnectionOptions) {

        // ...

        // added the instance as environment object here
        let contentView = ContentView().environment(\.managedObjectContext, context).environmentObject(device) 


        if let windowScene = scene as? UIWindowScene {

            // read the initial device orientation here
            device.isLandscape = (windowScene.interfaceOrientation.isLandscape == true)

            // ...            

        }
    }

    // added this function to register when the device is rotated
    func windowScene(_ windowScene: UIWindowScene, didUpdate previousCoordinateSpace: UICoordinateSpace, interfaceOrientation previousInterfaceOrientation: UIInterfaceOrientation, traitCollection previousTraitCollection: UITraitCollection) {
        device.isLandscape.toggle()
    }

   // ...

}


3
  • I get an error context undefined when trying it. What do I miss ?
    – claude31
    Jan 5 '20 at 20:09
  • Thank you, this works for me without .environment(\.managedObjectContext, context). Is that required ? Jan 15 '20 at 4:15
  • 1
    @JesperKristiansen this is needed when you work with CoreData
    – simibac
    Jan 15 '20 at 4:18
8

SwiftUI 2

Here is a solution that is not using the SceneDelegate (which is missing in the new SwiftUI life cycle).

It also uses interfaceOrientation from the current window scene instead of the UIDevice.current.orientation (which is not set when the app starts).

Here is a demo:

struct ContentView: View {
    @State private var isPortrait = false
    
    var body: some View {
        Text("isPortrait: \(String(isPortrait))")
            .onReceive(NotificationCenter.default.publisher(for: UIDevice.orientationDidChangeNotification)) { _ in
                guard let scene = UIApplication.shared.windows.first?.windowScene else { return }
                self.isPortrait = scene.interfaceOrientation.isPortrait
            }
    }
}

It is also possible to use an extension for accessing the current window scene:

extension UIApplication {
    var currentScene: UIWindowScene? {
        connectedScenes
            .first { $0.activationState == .foregroundActive } as? UIWindowScene
    }
}

and use it like this:

guard let scene = UIApplication.shared.currentScene else { return }
1
  • 1
    I think this is the best Swift 2.0 answer if you need both the initial and ongoing portrait/landscape state. Thanks! Mar 8 at 19:30
7

I think easy repainting is possible with addition of

@Environment(\.verticalSizeClass) var sizeClass

to View struct.

I have such example:

struct MainView: View {

    @EnvironmentObject var model: HamburgerMenuModel
    @Environment(\.verticalSizeClass) var sizeClass

    var body: some View {

        let tabBarHeight = UITabBarController().tabBar.frame.height

        return ZStack {
            HamburgerTabView()
            HamburgerExtraView()
                .padding(.bottom, tabBarHeight)

        }

    }
}

As you can see I need to recalculate tabBarHeight to apply correct bottom padding on Extra View, and addition of this property seems to correctly trigger repainting.

With just one line of code!

2
  • Wow! Thats an easy solution and it does exactly what i need. Thank you for sharing this idea.
    – Enrico
    Apr 19 '20 at 21:41
  • My best SO moment of the day. Instantly works. Thanks!
    – elight
    Jul 10 '20 at 22:57
5

I tried some of the previous answers, but had a few problems. One of the solutions would work 95% of the time but would screw up the layout every now and again. Other solutions didn't seem to be in tune with SwiftUI's way of doing things. So I came up with my own solution. You might notice that it combines features of several previous suggestions.

// Device.swift
import Combine
import UIKit

final public class Device: ObservableObject {

  @Published public var isLandscape: Bool = false

public init() {}

}

//  SceneDelegate.swift
import SwiftUI

class SceneDelegate: UIResponder, UIWindowSceneDelegate {

    var window: UIWindow?
    var device = Device()

   func scene(_ scene: UIScene, 
        willConnectTo session: UISceneSession, 
        options connectionOptions: UIScene.ConnectionOptions) {

        let contentView = ContentView()
             .environmentObject(device)
        if let windowScene = scene as? UIWindowScene {
        // standard template generated code
        // Yada Yada Yada

           let size = windowScene.screen.bounds.size
           device.isLandscape = size.width > size.height
        }
}
// more standard template generated code
// Yada Yada Yada
func windowScene(_ windowScene: UIWindowScene, 
    didUpdate previousCoordinateSpace: UICoordinateSpace, 
    interfaceOrientation previousInterfaceOrientation: UIInterfaceOrientation, 
    traitCollection previousTraitCollection: UITraitCollection) {

    let size = windowScene.screen.bounds.size
    device.isLandscape = size.width > size.height
}
// the rest of the file

// ContentView.swift
import SwiftUI

struct ContentView: View {
    @EnvironmentObject var device : Device
    var body: some View {
            VStack {
                    if self.device.isLandscape {
                    // Do something
                        } else {
                    // Do something else
                        }
                    }
      }
} 
3

Inspired by @caram solution, I grab the isLandscape property from windowScene

In SceneDelegate.swift, get the current orientation from window.windowScene.interfaceOrientation

...
var model = Model()
...

func windowScene(_ windowScene: UIWindowScene, didUpdate previousCoordinateSpace: UICoordinateSpace, interfaceOrientation previousInterfaceOrientation: UIInterfaceOrientation, traitCollection previousTraitCollection: UITraitCollection) {    
    model.isLandScape = windowScene.interfaceOrientation.isLandscape
}

In this way, we'll get true from the start if the user launches the app from the landscape mode.

Here is the Model

class Model: ObservableObject {
    @Published var isLandScape: Bool = false
}

And we can use it in the exact same way as @kontiki suggested

struct ContentView: View {
    @EnvironmentObject var model: Model

    var body: some View {
        Group {
            if model.isLandscape {
                Text("LANDSCAPE")
            } else {
                Text("PORTRAIT")
            }
        }
    }
}
2

It's easy to go without notifications, delegation methods, events, changes to SceneDelegate.swift, window.windowScene.interfaceOrientation and so on. try running this in simulator and rotating device.

struct ContentView: View {
    let cards = ["a", "b", "c", "d", "e"]
    @Environment(\.horizontalSizeClass) var horizontalSizeClass
    var body: some View {
        let arrOfTexts = {
            ForEach(cards.indices) { (i) in
                Text(self.cards[i])
            }
        }()
        if (horizontalSizeClass == .compact) {
            return VStack {
                arrOfTexts
            }.erase()
        } else {
            return VStack {
                HStack {
                    arrOfTexts
                }
            }.erase()
        }
    }
}

extension  View {
    func erase() -> AnyView {
        return AnyView(self)
    }
}
2

Here is an abstraction that allows you to wrap any part of your view tree in optional orientation based behavior, as a bonus, it doesn't rely on UIDevice orientation but instead bases it on the geometry of the space, this allows it to work in swift preview, as well as provide logic for different layouts based specifically on the container for your view:

struct OrientationView<L: View, P: View> : View {
    let landscape : L
    let portrait : P

    var body: some View {
        GeometryReader { geometry in
            Group {
                if geometry.size.width > geometry.size.height { self.landscape }
                else { self.portrait }
            }.frame(maxWidth: .infinity, maxHeight: .infinity)
        }
    }

    init(landscape: L, portrait: P) {
        self.landscape = landscape
        self.portrait = portrait
    }
}

struct OrientationView_Previews: PreviewProvider {
    static var previews: some View {
        OrientationView(landscape: Text("Landscape"), portrait: Text("Portrait"))
            .frame(width: 700, height: 600)
            .background(Color.gray)
    }
}

Usage: OrientationView(landscape: Text("Landscape"), portrait: Text("Portrait"))

2

The best way to do this in iOS 14:

// GlobalStates.swift
import Foundation
import SwiftUI

class GlobalStates: ObservableObject {
    @Published var isLandScape: Bool = false
}



// YourAppNameApp.swift
import SwiftUI

@main
struct YourAppNameApp: App {

    // GlobalStates() is an ObservableObject class
    var globalStates = GlobalStates()

    // Device Orientation
    let orientationChanged = NotificationCenter.default.publisher(for: UIDevice.orientationDidChangeNotification)
            .makeConnectable()
            .autoconnect()

    var body: some Scene {
        WindowGroup {
            ContentView()
                .environmentObject(globalStates)
                .onReceive(orientationChanged) { _ in
                    // Set the state for current device rotation
                    if UIDevice.current.orientation.isFlat {
                        // ignore orientation change
                    } else {
                        globalStates.isLandscape = UIDevice.current.orientation.isLandscape
                    }
        }
    }
}

// Now globalStates.isLandscape can be used in any view
// ContentView.swift
import SwiftUI

struct ContentView: View {
    @EnvironmentObject var globalStates: GlobalStates
    var body: some View {
            VStack {
                    if globalStates.isLandscape {
                    // Do something
                        } else {
                    // Do something else
                        }
                    }
      }
} 

0

This seems to work for me. Then just init and use Orientation instance as environmentobject

class Orientation: ObservableObject {
        let objectWillChange = ObservableObjectPublisher()

        var isLandScape:Bool = false {
            willSet {
                objectWillChange.send() }
        }

        var cancellable: Cancellable?

        init() {

            cancellable = NotificationCenter.default
                .publisher(for: UIDevice.orientationDidChangeNotification)
                .map() { _ in (UIDevice.current.orientation == .landscapeLeft || UIDevice.current.orientation == .landscapeRight)}
                .removeDuplicates()
                .assign(to: \.isLandScape, on: self)
        }
    }
1
  • 1
    This solution does not detect the initial orientation correctly if it's not portrait.
    – ltm
    Oct 29 '20 at 22:28
0

I got

"Fatal error: No ObservableObject of type SomeType found"

because I forgot to call contentView.environmentObject(orientationInfo) in SceneDelegate.swift. Here is my working version:

// OrientationInfo.swift
final class OrientationInfo: ObservableObject {
    @Published var isLandscape = false
}

// SceneDelegate.swift
var orientationInfo = OrientationInfo()

func scene(_ scene: UIScene, willConnectTo session: UISceneSession, options connectionOptions: UIScene.ConnectionOptions) {
    // ...
    window.rootViewController = UIHostingController(rootView: contentView.environmentObject(orientationInfo))
    // ...
}

func windowScene(_ windowScene: UIWindowScene, didUpdate previousCoordinateSpace: UICoordinateSpace, interfaceOrientation previousInterfaceOrientation: UIInterfaceOrientation, traitCollection previousTraitCollection: UITraitCollection) {
    orientationInfo.isLandscape = windowScene.interfaceOrientation.isLandscape
}

// YourView.swift
@EnvironmentObject var orientationInfo: OrientationInfo

var body: some View {
    Group {
        if orientationInfo.isLandscape {
            Text("LANDSCAPE")
        } else {
            Text("PORTRAIT")
        }
    }
}
0

I wanted to know if there is simple solution within SwiftUI that works with any enclosed view so it can determine a different landscape/portrait layout. As briefly mentioned by @dfd GeometryReader can be used to trigger an update.

Note that this works in the special occasions where use of the standard size class/traits do not provide sufficient information to implement a design. For example, where a different layout is required for portrait and landscape but where both orientations result in a standard size class being returned from the environment. This happens with the largest devices, like the max sized phones and with iPads.

This is the 'naive' version and this does not work.

struct RotatingWrapper: View {
     
      var body: some View {
            GeometryReader { geometry in
                if geometry.size.width > geometry.size.height {
                     LandscapeView()
                 }
                 else {
                     PortraitView()
                }
           }
     }
}

This following version is a variation on a rotatable class that is a good example of function builders from @reuschj but just simplified for my application requirements https://github.com/reuschj/RotatableStack/blob/master/Sources/RotatableStack/RotatableStack.swift

This does work

struct RotatingWrapper: View {
    
    func getIsLandscape(geometry:GeometryProxy) -> Bool {
        return geometry.size.width > geometry.size.height
    }
    
    var body: some View {
        GeometryReader { geometry in
            if self.getIsLandscape(geometry:geometry) {
                Text("Landscape")
            }
            else {
                Text("Portrait").rotationEffect(Angle(degrees:90))
            }
        }
    } 
}

That is interesting because I'm assuming that some SwiftUI magic has caused this apparently simple semantic change to activate the view re-rendering.

One more weird trick that you can use this for, is to 'hack' a re-render this way, throw away the result of using the GeometryProxy and perform a Device orientation lookup. This then enables use of the full range of orientations, in this example the detail is ignored and the result used to trigger a simple portrait and landscape selection or whatever else is required.

enum  Orientation {
    case landscape 
    case portrait 
}

struct RotatingWrapper: View {
   
    func getOrientation(geometry:GeometryProxy) -> Orientation {
        let _  = geometry.size.width > geometry.size.height
        if   UIDevice.current.orientation == UIDeviceOrientation.landscapeLeft || UIDevice.current.orientation == UIDeviceOrientation.landscapeRight {
            return .landscape
        }
        else {
            return .portrait
        }
     }
    
    var body: some View {
       ZStack {
        GeometryReader { geometry in
            if  self.getOrientation(geometry: geometry) == .landscape {
                 LandscapeView()
             }
             else {
                 PortraitView()
            }
        }
        }
     }
    
}

Furthermore, once your top level view is being refreshed you can then use DeviceOrientation directly, such as the following in child views as all child views will be checked once the top level view is 'invalidated'

Eg: In the LandscapeView() we can format child views appropriately for its horizontal position.

struct LandscapeView: View {
    
    var body: some View {
         HStack   {
            Group {
            if  UIDevice.current.orientation == UIDeviceOrientation.landscapeLeft {
                VerticallyCenteredContentView()
            }
                Image("rubric")
                    .resizable()
                              .frame(width:18, height:89)
                              //.border(Color.yellow)
                    .padding([UIDevice.current.orientation == UIDeviceOrientation.landscapeLeft ? .trailing : .leading], 16)
            }
            if  UIDevice.current.orientation == UIDeviceOrientation.landscapeRight {
              VerticallyCenteredContentView()
            }
         }.border(Color.pink)
   }
}
1
  • 1
    Very good examples. My guess on why your FIRST example fails but your SECOND example works has to do with the fact that when you call a function OUTSIDE of the BODY block it doesn't "inline" but checks for it at runtime. Once the BODY VIEW has been created you've got to connect to a STATE var or something to fire a "refresh" of the view.
    – Waxhaw
    Jul 27 '20 at 18:58
0

Try to use horizontalSizeClass & verticalSizeClass:

import SwiftUI

struct DemoView: View {
    
    @Environment(\.horizontalSizeClass) var hSizeClass
    @Environment(\.verticalSizeClass) var vSizeClass
    
    var body: some View {
        VStack {
            if hSizeClass == .compact && vSizeClass == .regular {
                VStack {
                    Text("Vertical View")
                }
            } else {
                HStack {
                    Text("Horizontal View")
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

Found it in this tutorial. Related Apple's documentation.

0

Another hack to detect the change of orientation but also the splitView. (inspired by @Rocket Garden)

import SwiftUI
import Foundation

struct TopView: View {

    var body: some View {
        GeometryReader{
            geo in
            VStack{
                if keepSize(geo: geo) {
                    ChildView()
                }
            }.frame(width: geo.size.width, height: geo.size.height, alignment: .center)
        }.background(Color.red)
    }
    
    func keepSize(geo:GeometryProxy) -> Bool {
        MyScreen.shared.width  = geo.size.width
        MyScreen.shared.height = geo.size.height
        return true
    }
}

class MyScreen:ObservableObject {
    static var shared:MyScreen = MyScreen()
    @Published var width:CGFloat = 0
    @Published var height:CGFloat = 0
}

struct ChildView: View {
    // The presence of this line also allows direct access to up-to-date UIScreen.main.bounds.size.width & .height
    @StateObject var myScreen:MyScreen = MyScreen.shared
    
    var body: some View {
        VStack{
            if myScreen.width > myScreen.height {
                Text("Paysage")
            } else {
                Text("Portrait")
            }
        }
    }
}

0

I have updated https://stackoverflow.com/a/62370919/7139611 to load it for the initial view and make it as work globally using Environment object.

    import SwiftUI

class Orientation: ObservableObject {
    @Published var isLandscape: Bool = UIDevice.current.orientation.isLandscape
}

struct ContentView: View {
    
    @StateObject var orientation = Orientation()
    @State var initialOrientationIsLandScape = false

    let orientationChanged = NotificationCenter.default.publisher(for: UIDevice.orientationDidChangeNotification)
        .makeConnectable()
        .autoconnect()

    var body: some View {
        Group {
            if orientation.isLandscape {
                Text("LANDSCAPE")
            } else {
                Text("PORTRAIT")
            }
        }
        .onReceive(orientationChanged, perform: { _ in
            if initialOrientationIsLandScape {
                initialOrientationIsLandScape = false
            } else {
                orientation.isLandscape = UIDevice.current.orientation.isLandscape
            }
        })
        .onAppear {
            orientation.isLandscape = UIDevice.current.orientation.isLandscape
            initialOrientationIsLandScape = orientation.isLandscape
        }
    }
}

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