389

imagine what we have something like this:

<div id="xxx"><p>Hello World</p></div>

if we call .html function in this way:

$("#xxx").html();

we will get:

<p>Hello World</p>

But i need to get:

<div id="xxx"><p>Hello World</p></div>

So, what i need to do? I think to add another wrapper around #xxx, but this is not a good idea.

2
  • 14
    Anyone wanting to write to rather than read outerHTML should use $(sel).replaceWith() Commented Nov 25, 2013 at 23:11
  • 1
    rbdev: Any chance of changing the correct answer here? Commented Nov 15, 2017 at 18:17

4 Answers 4

1337

Just use standard DOM functionality:

$('#xxx')[0].outerHTML

Or a bit simpler with .prop():

$('#xxx').prop('outerHTML')

outerHTML is well supported - verify at Mozilla or caniuse.

12
  • 309
    another option: $('#xxx').prop('outerHTML')
    – Aaron
    Commented Mar 15, 2013 at 20:51
  • 12
    Keep in mind that as of April 2015, SVG elements still don't have an outerHTML property in all browsers, see: stackoverflow.com/a/20559830/656010
    – Tom Wayson
    Commented Apr 30, 2015 at 15:42
  • 4
    Keep in mind that this approach doesn't execute javascript in the html while jQuery method that accepts an HTML string can execute code.
    – Gqqnbig
    Commented Aug 10, 2015 at 18:28
  • 12
    Update: since the addition of prop() to the jQuery source, the above can now be made more succinct: $('#xxx').prop('outerHTML'); Commented Sep 25, 2015 at 14:48
  • 3
    Keep in mind that this approach gives outerHTML of only first element, e.g. $('<i>a</i><b>b</b>')[0].outerHTML will return <i>a</i>, not <i>a</i><b>b</b>.
    – izogfif
    Commented Mar 15, 2018 at 9:19
218

Create a temporary element, then clone() and append():

$('<div>').append($('#xxx').clone()).html();
15
  • 6
    @jamietre, yes because .append() will always move the element.
    – David Tang
    Commented Apr 21, 2011 at 12:45
  • 80
    I down voted because this is a terribly circuitous method of solving a simple problem. See the docs for VanillaJS: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/element.outerHTML
    – just_wes
    Commented Aug 29, 2013 at 18:52
  • 48
    This is a great example of having "jQuery blinders" on, because the plain JS solution (see Andy's solution below) is so much simpler. Commented Nov 22, 2013 at 18:35
  • 5
    This seems like an overlycomplicatedheavyweight solution. I prefer just using the simple dom outerHTML property.
    – Brain2000
    Commented Jan 24, 2014 at 19:17
  • 3
    This solution is better because outerHTML property can be missing in some special cases.
    – Andrej
    Commented Mar 18, 2016 at 15:06
83

No siblings solution:

var x = $('#xxx').parent().html();
alert(x);

Universal solution:

// no cloning necessary    
var x = $('#xxx').wrapAll('<div>').parent().html(); 
alert(x);

Fiddle here: http://jsfiddle.net/ezmilhouse/Mv76a/

7
  • 31
    Won't work if the parent has other children.
    – David Tang
    Commented Apr 21, 2011 at 12:42
  • ...and what if $('#xxx') has siblings? Commented Apr 21, 2011 at 12:43
  • Will not work in all cases, see jsfiddle.net/markcoleman/YtTdd/1 Commented Apr 21, 2011 at 12:43
  • 3
    In the example given, there are no siblings.
    – DavidGouge
    Commented Apr 21, 2011 at 12:44
  • 13
    Nor were there parents. Commented Apr 21, 2011 at 12:45
-9

If you don't want to add a wrapper, you could just add the code manually, since you know the ID you are targeting:

var myID = "xxx";

var newCode = "<div id='"+myID+"'>"+$("#"+myID).html()+"</div>";
1
  • 3
    What if it is not a div?
    – fiatjaf
    Commented Dec 26, 2014 at 9:38

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