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When using DI for services added using AddScoped or AddSingleton, does the service need to implement IDisposable (even if it is not using any unmanaged resources like files)?

Found below sample from Microsoft Docs:

// Services that implement IDisposable:
public class Service1 : IDisposable {}
public class Service2 : IDisposable {}
public class Service3 : IDisposable {}

public interface ISomeService {}
public class SomeServiceImplementation : ISomeService, IDisposable {}

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
    // The container creates the following instances and disposes them automatically:
       services.AddScoped<Service1>();
       services.AddSingleton<Service2>();
       services.AddSingleton<ISomeService>(sp => new SomeServiceImplementation());

    // The container doesn't create the following instances, so it doesn't dispose of
    // the instances automatically:
       services.AddSingleton<Service3>(new Service3());
       services.AddSingleton(new Service3());
}

What happens if I have this code:

public class Service0  // (doesn't implement Disposable) 

services.AddScoped<Service0>();   // what happens to it when request scope ends? Does it stay on the heap?

services.AddSingleton<Service0>();   // it lives till application dies
services.AddSingleton(new Service0());  // ??
services.AddSingleton<IConfigureOptions<Service0>>((ctx) =>
   {
          return new ConfigureNamedOptions<Service0>(null, (config) =>
   {
// Do something here -- in debug mode it is executing this logic for each request
}}  // it is returning "new Service0" when a request is made. Does it mean for each request it returns new object and keeps in heap memory or returns same previously created object?
  • That particular Microsoft documentation example simply tries to educate you about the container's behavior when it comes to disposable components. It is not meant to tell you that all components must implement IDisposable. On the contrary: having to implement IDisposable should be the exception, not the norm. – Steven Aug 12 '19 at 17:45
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does the service need to implement IDisposable(even if it is not using any unmanaged resources like files)

Usually it doesn't, because the primary purpose of IDisposable is allow releasing unmanaged resources. However, there is an additional reason for implementing IDisposable. The Dispose() method is sometimes used as a hook for completing actions started in the constructor. For example, a constructor starts duration measurement, while Dispose() stops the measurement and reports the duration to some monitoring mechanism.

A little of backgroiund about IDisposable

If an object doesn't implement IDisposable it doesn't mean it stays in heap. In fact, the GC doesn't even know what IDisposable is. This interface is only a pattern. However, the compiler knows IDisposable, and it emits calls to Dispose() in the end of using statement scope.

In addition, in many cases infrastructure layers or libraries (such as DI in ASP.NET Core) check if an object implements IDisposable, and if it does, call Dispose() on it.

So the fact that an object implements IDisposable doesn't by itself guarantee that Dispose() will be called before GC. It depends on the users of the object. To actually ensure Dispose() before GC, the full implementation of the disposable pattern includes calling Dispose() from the "destructor".

what happens to it when request scope ends? stays in heap? what happens to it when request scope ends?

  • AddScoped<Service0>(): at the end of the request, the reference to the object is "forgotten" (the GC is free to remove it at any moment). Just prior to forgetting the reference, the object is checked for whether it implements IDisposable, and if it does, Dispose() will be called on it.

  • AddSingleton<Service0>(): at the end of the web host lifetime, the reference to the object is "forgotten" (the GC is free to remove it at any moment). Just prior to forgetting the reference, the object is checked for whether it implements IDisposable, and if it does, Dispose() will be called on it.

  • AddSingleton(new Service0()): at the end of the web host lifetime, the reference to the object is "forgotten" (the GC is free to remove it at any moment). But since this object was supplied from the outside and not instantiated by the DI, it won't be checked for IDisposable and the Dispose won't be called.

  • Since its missing from your list, providing a factory method that returns an IDisposable will also call Dispose, even if that factory returns a "static" instance. For example, services.AddSingleton(_ => new Service0()); and var s0 = new Service0(); services.AddSingleton(_ => s0); will both get disposed (if they implement IDisposable) – pinkfloydx33 Aug 11 '19 at 9:50
  • Question on AddSingleton(new Service0()): confused on this statement "it won't be checked for IDisposable", as @pinkflyoedx33 mentioned if we implement "IDisposable" it will be cleaned, only thing is GC wont trigger auto-clean for this object. correct me if I'm wrong. Another Question services.AddSingleton<IConfigureOptions<Service0>>((ctx) => { return new ConfigureNamedOptions<Service0>(null, (config) => {// Do something here }} . what does it mean it returns "new service0" at each new request. I thought it gets created first time and following requests it just ignores. – user2608601 Aug 11 '19 at 14:10
  • in my application "new service0" deals with IConfigurationHost which deals with reading config files which internally triggers physicalfileswatcher changetoken. just wondering if it creates "new service0" for each request will it trigger too many changetokens. – user2608601 Aug 11 '19 at 14:13
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IDisposable is just an interface which give the implementer class the chance to do some cleanup on object destruction , it does not do anything by itself. DI will destroy the instances depends on their lifetime like scoped , transient , Singleton, will the object exists after destruction on the heap is the Gorbagge Collector's duty to decide . If you define a new instace inside a Singleton that object will be destroyed with the Singleton instace and due to lifetime of the Singleton which is till the end of the application's lifetime therefore it will follow it's parent's lifetime , except if you do some unmanaged operation there.

  • services.AddScoped<someservice>(); when I make a httprequest, in memory dump I can see object count went up, but this count doesn't go down even if I call GC.collect. I thought GC.collect will force to decrease object counter or is it something child object is stopping this object to destroy(I'm also disposing child objects to be on safer side) or its up to GC when to clean it. not sure where I'm going wrong FYI: child object involves EntityFramework context – user2608601 Aug 13 '19 at 20:03
  • What is the scope of the entity framework's db context ? – Ali Alp Aug 13 '19 at 20:14
  • my understanding by default DBcontext always works as scoped context services.AddDbContext<someContext>((options) => { var connectionFactory = services.BuildServiceProvider().GetService<IConnectionFactory>(); options.UseSqlServer(connectionFactory.GetConnectionString("somecdbconnection")); }); contextFile has this code private static Dictionary<Type, List<Tuple<Type, string, string>>> tempdic= new Dictionary<Type, List<Tuple<Type, string, string>>>(); DbSet<someEntity> training{ get; set; } – user2608601 Aug 13 '19 at 21:08

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