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I am writing a custom iterator but I am seeing different warnings in my Java code.

Here is my code:

import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.Iterator;
import java.util.List;

public class CustomIterator<E> implements Iterator<E> {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        List<String> a = Arrays.asList("alpha", "beta", "gamma");
        List<Integer> b = Arrays.asList(1, 2, 3);

        // Type safety: The constructor CustomIterator(Iterator...) belongs to the raw type CustomIterator. References to generic type CustomIterator<E> should be parameterized
        CustomIterator it = new CustomIterator(a.iterator(), b.iterator());
        // some logic
    }

    // Type safety: Potential heap pollution via varargs parameter iterators
    public CustomIterator(Iterator<E>... iterators) {
        // some logic
    }

    @Override
    public boolean hasNext() {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        return false;
    }

    @Override
    public E next() {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        return null;
    }
}

I just added the warnings as comments in above code.

It occurs at 2 places:

// Type safety: The constructor CustomIterator(Iterator...) belongs to the raw type CustomIterator. References to generic type CustomIterator<E> should be parameterized
CustomIterator it = new CustomIterator(a.iterator(), b.iterator());

and also here:

// Type safety: Potential heap pollution via varargs parameter iterators
    public CustomIterator(Iterator<E>... iterators) {
        // some logic
    }

I can use @SuppressWarnings({ "unchecked", "rawtypes" }) to suppress them but I want to know why I am getting these and how to avoid them without suppressing.

marked as duplicate by Stephen C, Michael java Aug 11 at 11:00

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  • You probably can't avoid suppressing them. What you are doing has real type-safety issues. There is actually no type E that you could safely instantiate this ... apart from Object. In other words, you don't get any benefit from using generics here. – Stephen C Aug 11 at 11:07
  • You need a declaration like @SafeVarargs public CustomIterator(Iterator<? extends E>... iterators) – Holger Aug 12 at 8:50
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You can't safely pass two Iterators of different element types (Iterator<String> and Iterator<Integer> to your CustomIterator constructor.

If you hadn't used raw types (as in CustomIterator it), the compiler would have told you so. The following, for example, won't pass compilation:

CustomIterator<Integer> it = new CustomIterator<Integer>(a.iterator(), b.iterator());
  • 1
    @Michael no, CustomIterator<Object> it = new CustomIterator<Object>(a.iterator(), b.iterator()); doesn't pass compilation (unless you change a and b to List<Object>). – Eran Aug 11 at 11:03

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