-5

I have numbers like this

4, 4, 4, 7, 7, 9, 9, 9, 9, 2, 2, 2, 4, 4

I want to change them into

1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 5, 5, which is renumbered from 1, and with 1 increment, no matter if some number appears again.

So in Python, what is the most efficient way to do this?

It is a series of numbers from my protein PDB residue ID. Each residue has multiple atoms. The pdb also has multiple chains and missing residues, that is why the input number re-start from the beginning at some point and always have some gaps. But I just want the numbers to be 1 increment from 1 to the very last residue.

closed as too broad by Prune, Makoto, hiro protagonist Aug 13 at 16:02

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • please show what you have tried. also: what happens to the sequence 4, 4, 7, 7, 9, 9, 2, 2, 4, 4? – hiro protagonist Aug 13 at 15:57
  • "what I have tried"? I do not know how to achieve this. "What happens to the sequence"? it is a series of numbers from my protein PDB residue ID. Each residue has multiple atoms. But I want to simplify it so not mention the protein stuff. – lanselibai Aug 13 at 16:01
  • from your question it is unclear what the result of the sequence i asked about should be (the first answer gives you a version for both possible interpretations...). – hiro protagonist Aug 13 at 16:03
  • @lanselibai: so presumably you want to re-use the same number for the same protein PDB residue ID. – Martijn Pieters Aug 13 at 16:14
  • sure, I changed the example, so the 1 increment will also be made. – lanselibai Aug 13 at 16:14
4

Use the itertools.count() together with a collections.defaultdict() object to map unique values to an increasing count:

from itertools import count
from collections import defaultdict

counter = defaultdict(count(1).__next__)
result = [counter[v] for v in inputlist]

count(1) starts counting at 1 (as opposed to the default starting value of 0, and the __next__ method produces the next value each time the counter[v] dictionary lookup uses a value that is not yet in the dictionary:

>>> counter = defaultdict(count(1).__next__)
>>> counter["foo"]  # not yet in the dictionary
1
>>> counter["foo"]  # already in the dictionary
1
>>> counter["bar"]  # new value, so a new count is assigned
2
>>> counter
defaultdict(<method-wrapper '__next__' of itertools.count object at 0x10b2a7fc0>, {'foo': 1, 'bar': 2})

Demo:

>>> from itertools import count
>>> from collections import defaultdict
>>> example = [4, 4, 4, 7, 7, 9, 9, 9, 9, 2, 2, 2]
>>> counter = defaultdict(count(1).__next__)
>>> [counter[v] for v in example]
[1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4]

This does assume that if a given number in the input list appears again later on (so not in the same consecutive group) that the number is reused:

>>> counter_example = [4, 4, 4, 7, 7, 9, 9, 9, 9, 2, 2, 2, 4, 4, 4, 4]
>>> counter = defaultdict(count(1).__next__)
>>> [counter[v] for v in counter_example]
[1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 1, 1, 1, 1]

If that's an issue, then use itertools.groupby() together with enumerate() to number groups of consecutive numbers:

from itertools import count, groupby

result = [c for c, (k, g) in enumerate(groupby(inputlist), 1) for _ in g]

Here the starting value of 1 is passed to enumerate() as the second argument (enumerate(), like count(), starts counting at 0 by default).

groupby() creates groups where consecutive values are equal, so two runs of 4 separated by other values form two separate groups and they each get a separate count. You do then need to repeat the assigned number as many times as there are values in each group, hence the for _ in g loop at the end.

Demo:

>>> [c for c, (k, g) in enumerate(groupby(example), 1) for _ in g]
[1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4]
>>> [c for c, (k, g) in enumerate(groupby(counter_example), 1) for _ in g]
[1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 5, 5, 5, 5]

Note that either solution can be made entirely lazy with map() or additional itertools functions:

# lazy defaultdict lookups

counter = defaultdict(count(1).__next__)
lazy_result = map(counter.__getitem__, inputlist)

and

# lazy group enumeration

from itertools import chain, repeat

lazy_result = chain.from_iterable(
    repeat(c, sum(1 for _ in g))  # sum() calculates iterator length efficiently
    for c, (k, g) in enumerate(groupby(inputlist), 1)
)
2

You can use itertools.groupby and enumerate like this

>>> from itertools import groupby
>>> lst = [4, 4, 4, 7, 7, 9, 9, 9, 9, 2, 2, 2]
>>> [i for i,(_,grp) in enumerate(groupby(lst), 1) for _ in grp ]
[1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4]
  • I initially had made the mistake of overcomplicating my groupby() with count(), then switched to enumerate(). I had not yet seen your answer when I did so however! Sorry if that looked like I updated my answer to reflect yours. – Martijn Pieters Aug 13 at 16:13
  • @MartijnPieters. No issues :) – Sunitha Aug 13 at 16:25

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.