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I want to compare the returns of simple moving averages strategy with original returns following the textbook code. The only difference lies in the treatment of N/A data and the results are completely different.

According to the definition of df.dropna(inplace=True), it keeps the DataFrame with valid entries in the same variable, which should be equal to df=df.dropna(). But results are different, why?

1.textbook treatment:

    data=pd.DataFrame(data)

    data['SMA1'] = data['Close'].rolling(42).mean()
    data['SMA2'] = data['Close'].rolling(252).mean()

    data['Position'] = np.where(data['SMA1'] > data['SMA2'], 1, -1)
    data['Returns'] = np.log(data['Close'] / data['Close'].shift(1))
    data['Strategy'] = data['Position'].shift(1) * data['Returns']
    data.dropna(inplace=True)

    np.exp(data[['Returns', 'Strategy']].sum())

#output 1
#Returns     4.017144
#Strategy    5.811294

2.my treatment

    data=pd.DataFrame(data)
    data['SMA1'] = data['Close'].rolling(42).mean()
    data['SMA2'] = data['Close'].rolling(252).mean()

    data['Position'] = np.where(data['SMA1'] > data['SMA2'], 1, -1)
    data['Returns'] = np.log(data['Close'] / data['Close'].shift(1))
    data['Strategy'] = data['Position'].shift(1) * data['Returns']
    data=data.dropna()

    np.exp(data[['Returns', 'Strategy']].sum())

#output 2
#Returns     3.199432
#Strategy    4.628373
  • This is strange. Can you share the data? Or you can try checking data.shape and content of data in both methods. May be from that you can figure out something. – Poojan Aug 13 at 17:12
  • If you're running them one after the other data = pd.DataFrame(data) does not re-initialize the DataFrame in treatment 2. It copies it from where you left off (the end of the previous calculation) so these calculations aren't starting from the same point. – ALollz Aug 13 at 17:14
  • Like someone else said, restart the kernel and run them separately. They are supposed to return the same result. – Parijat Bhatt Aug 13 at 17:21
  • Thank you all, you have solved my problem! The results do look different after each operation because of the change of data shape. I thought the second 'data' in the code data = pd.DataFrame(data) would have referred to the original panda series. – Rochelle Wang Aug 13 at 17:26
  • @RochelleWang nope, because data becomes your DataFrame, which you then modify, and pandas has no issues constructing a DataFrame from a DataFrame (which is why it goes unnoticed later). I'd just name your DataFrames df instead of data. – ALollz Aug 13 at 17:33

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