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I have to write a Taylor series until the 16th element that calculates sin and compare the values returned values with Math.sin. Well , everything works fine until the last time when instead of 0.00000 i get 0.006941.Where is my error and if somebody have an idea how to write this in a more professional way I would be very happy.

import java.text.NumberFormat;
import java.text.DecimalFormat;
import java.util.ArrayList;

public class Main {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        NumberFormat formatter = new DecimalFormat("#0.000000");
        double val[] = {0, Math.PI / 3, Math.PI / 4, Math.PI / 6, Math.PI / 2, Math.PI};

        for (int i = 0; i < val.length; i++) {

            System.out.println("With Taylor method: " + formatter.format(Taylor(val[i])));
            System.out.println("With Math.sin method: " + formatter.format(Math.sin(val[i])));


        }
    }

        public static double Taylor ( double val){
            ArrayList<Double> memory = new ArrayList<Double>();
            double row = val;
            for (int i = 0, s = 3; i < 16; i++, s = s + 2) {

                double mth = Math.pow(val, s);
                double result = mth / factorial(s);
                memory.add(result);

            }

            for (int i = 0; i < 16; i++) {
                if (i % 2 == 0) {
                    double d = memory.get(i);

                    row = row - d;

                } else {
                    double d = memory.get(i);

                    row = row + d;

                }
            }
            return row;

        }

        public static long factorial ( double n){
            long fact = 1;
            for (int i = 2; i <= n; i++) {
                fact = fact * i;
            }
            return fact;
        }


    }
  • I don't know whether this is the cause of your problem, but I would expect that using Math.pow and factorial to calculate each term in the Taylor series for sine would end up being a whole lot less accurate than calculating each term from the last, by multiplying by -x^2/n(n-1). – Dawood ibn Kareem Aug 13 '19 at 20:15
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Your math is correct, but your factorials are overflowing once you get to calculating 21!. I printed out the factorials calculated.

factorial(3) = 6
factorial(5) = 120
factorial(7) = 5040
factorial(9) = 362880
factorial(11) = 39916800
factorial(13) = 6227020800
factorial(15) = 1307674368000
factorial(17) = 355687428096000
factorial(19) = 121645100408832000
factorial(21) = -4249290049419214848  // Overflow starting here!
factorial(23) = 8128291617894825984
factorial(25) = 7034535277573963776
factorial(27) = -5483646897237262336
factorial(29) = -7055958792655077376
factorial(31) = 4999213071378415616
factorial(33) = 3400198294675128320

It appears that your raising val to ever higher powers isn't significant enough to make a difference with the overflow until you get to the highest value in your array, Math.PI itself. There the error due to overflow is significant.

Instead, calculate each term using the last term as a starting point. If you have the last value you entered into memory, then just multiply val * val into that value and then divide the next two numbers in sequence for the factorial part.

That's because memory.get(i) is equal to memory.get(i - 1) * (val * val) / ((s - 1) * s). This also makes your calculation more efficient. It avoids the multiplication repetition when calculating the numerator (power part) and the denominator (the factorial calculation). This will also avoid the overflow which results from how you calculated the denominator separately.

My implementation of this idea substitutes this for the first for loop:

double mth = val;

for (int i = 0, s = 3; i < 16; i++, s = s + 2) {
    mth = mth * val * val;
    mth = mth / ((s - 1) * s);
    memory.add(mth);
}

and places

double row = val;

between the for loops, to ensure that the first term is the initial sum as you had it before. Then you don't even need the factorial method.

This this I get 0.000000 for Math.PI.

| improve this answer | |
  • Brilliant! Thank you very much! – Andrei Cirlig Aug 13 '19 at 22:02

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