7

If you have been looking for a nice and clean way to parse your query string values, I have come up with this:

    /// <summary>
    /// Parses the query string and returns a valid value.
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
    /// <param name="key">The query string key.</param>
    /// <param name="value">The value.</param>
    protected internal T ParseQueryStringValue<T>(string key, string value)
    {
        if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(value))
        {
            //TODO: Map other common QueryString parameters type ...
            if (typeof(T) == typeof(string))
            {
                return (T)Convert.ChangeType(value, typeof(T));
            }
            if (typeof(T) == typeof(int))
            {
                int tempValue;
                if (!int.TryParse(value, out tempValue))
                {
                    throw new ApplicationException(string.Format("Invalid QueryString parameter {0}. The value " +
                                                              "'{1}' is not a valid {2} type.", key, value, "int"));
                }
                return (T)Convert.ChangeType(tempValue, typeof(T));
            }
            if (typeof(T) == typeof(DateTime))
            {
                DateTime tempValue;
                if (!DateTime.TryParse(value, out tempValue))
                {
                    throw new ApplicationException(string.Format("Invalid QueryString parameter {0}. The value " +
                                                         "'{1}' is not a valid {2} type.", key, value, "DateTime"));
                }
                return (T)Convert.ChangeType(tempValue, typeof(T));
            }
        }
        return default(T);
    }

I have always wanted to have something like that and finally got it right ... at least I think so ...

The code should be self explanatory ...

Any comments or suggestions to make it better are appreciated.

  • Maybe you handle it earlier up your code stack, but remember that a key can have multiple values in a querystring, i.e. x=1,2,3 – jro Feb 22 '09 at 15:58
  • @jro I would consider the multiple values case to be invalid because as far as the querystring is concerned its only one value, a string of "1,2,3", parsing it as anything else would not be correct. – rtpHarry May 6 '11 at 13:37
34

A simple way to parse (if you dont want to do type conversions) is

 HttpUtility.ParseQueryString(queryString);

You can extract querystring from a URL with

 new Uri(url).Query
  • 4
    This only works if url is a full url. If you have a relative url, then the Query member of Uri is not supported. – jrwren Mar 27 '11 at 23:46
5

Given that you only handle three different types, I would suggest three different methods instead - generic methods are best when they work well with every type argument which is permitted by the type constraints.

In addition, I would strongly recommend that for int and DateTime you specify the culture to use - it shouldn't really depend on the culture the server happens to be in. (If you have code to guess the culture of the user, you could use that instead.) Finally, I'd also suggest supporting a well-specified set of DateTime formats rather than just whatever TryParse supports by default. (I pretty much always use ParseExact/TryParseExact instead of Parse/TryParse.)

Note that the string version doesn't really need to do anything, given that value is already a string (although your current code converts "" to null, which may or may not be what you want).

  • +1 for ParseExact/TryParseExact especially as you can pass an array of formats. – Richard Feb 22 '09 at 13:25
3

I've written the following method to parse the QueryString to strongly typed values:

public static bool TryGetValue<T>(string key, out T value, IFormatProvider provider)
{
    string queryStringValue = HttpContext.Current.Request.QueryString[key];

    if (queryStringValue != null)
    {
        // Value is found, try to change the type
        try
        {
            value = (T)Convert.ChangeType(queryStringValue, typeof(T), provider);
            return true;
        }
        catch
        {
            // Type could not be changed
        }
    }

    // Value is not found, return default
    value = default(T);
    return false;
}

Usage example:

int productId = 0;
bool success = TryGetValue<int>("ProductId", out productId, CultureInfo.CurrentCulture);

For a querystring of ?productId=5 the bool would be true and int productId would equal 5.

For a querystring of ?productId=hello the bool would be false and int productId would equal 0.

For a querystring of ?noProductId=notIncluded the bool would be false and int productId would equal 0.

2

In my application I've been using the following function:-

public static class WebUtil
{
    public static T GetValue<T>(string key, StateBag stateBag, T defaultValue)
    {
        object o = stateBag[key];

        return o == null ? defaultValue : (T)o;
    }
}

The required default is returned if the parameter has not been supplied, the type is inferred from defaultValue and casting exceptions are raised as necessary.

Usage is as follows:-

var foo = WebUtil.GetValue("foo", ViewState, default(int?));
2

This is an old answer, but i've done the following:

            string queryString = relayState.Split("?").ElementAt(1);
            NameValueCollection nvc = HttpUtility.ParseQueryString(queryString);
1

It seems to me that you are doing a lot of unecesary type convertions. The tempValue variables arere leady of the type you are trying to return. Likewise in the string case the value is already a string so just return it instead.

0

Based on Ronalds answer I have updated my own querystring parsing method. The way I use it is to add it as an extension method on the Page object so its easy for me to check querystring values and types and redirect if the page request is not valid.

The extension method looks like this:

public static class PageHelpers
{
    public static void RequireOrPermanentRedirect<T>(this System.Web.UI.Page page, string QueryStringKey, string RedirectUrl)
    {
        string QueryStringValue = page.Request.QueryString[QueryStringKey];

        if(String.IsNullOrEmpty(QueryStringValue))
        {
            page.Response.RedirectPermanent(RedirectUrl);
        }

        try
        {
            T value = (T)Convert.ChangeType(QueryStringValue, typeof(T));
        }
        catch
        {
            page.Response.RedirectPermanent(RedirectUrl);
        }
    }
}

This lets me do things like the following:

protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    Page.RequireOrPermanentRedirect<int>("CategoryId", "/");
}

I can then write the rest of my code and rely on the existence and correct format of the querystring item so I dont have to test it each time I want to access it.

Note: If you are using pre .net 4 then you will also want the following RedirectPermanent extension method:

public static class HttpResponseHelpers
{
    public static void RedirectPermanent(this System.Web.HttpResponse response, string uri)
    {
        response.StatusCode = 301;
        response.StatusDescription = "Moved Permanently";
        response.AddHeader("Location", uri);
        response.End();
    }
}

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