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I am working on a project using raspberry pi and an arduino. I'm writing a GO program on the raspberry pi to receive UART data from the Arduino at 115200 baud rate every second. The raspberry pi reads the UART data, saves it to a file (based on the value to either file1 or file2, etc), and then send the file to ftp server.

Since uploading to server might take time depending on network I want to use go concurrency so that UART reading and saving to file are not interrupted. The following is pseudocode (skeleton) that I am trying to apply. My thinking in the code is the filepaths will be buffered in the channel sequencially and the upload is performed in the same order. Am I doing it correctly? Is there a better way to approach the problem?

package main

import "strings"

func SendFile(filePath string) {

}
// based on the value of the data, SaveToFile saves the data to either file1, file2 or file3
func SaveToFile(uartData []string) filePath string {

    return filePath
}

func main() {


    ch := make(chan string, 1000)

    //uartInit initialization goes here
    uart := uartInit()

    //infinite loop for reading UART...
    for {
        buf := 1024 // UART buffer
        data := uart.Read(buf)
        uartData = strings.Split(string(buf), " ")

        //channel receives filepath 
        ch <- SaveToFile(uartData)

        //channel sends filepath
        go SendFile(<-ch)

    }
}
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You are writing one string to the channel, and reading it back. The sendFile() runs in a different goroutine, but there is no need for the channel in the way you're using it. You could simply do

 fname:= SaveToFile(uartData)
 go SendFile(fname)

However, I don't think this is what you want to do.

Instead, you should have a goroutine in which you read data from the UART, and write to a buffered channel. Listening to that channel is another goroutine that writes blocks of data to a file. When it is ready to be sent, create a third goroutine to send the file.

  • 1
    "Create a third goroutine to send the file." That doesn't solve the problem at all; the behavior would be exactly the same as in the original code. The second goroutine must upload the files one at a time to guarantee ordering. – Peter Aug 14 at 7:31
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After reading the comments and some online resources the following approach seems to work fine so far. The first 8 minutes in this video was quite helpful to understand the concept. The defer close(ch) is something I'm uncertain, though.

package main

import "strings"

func SendFile(ch chan string) {
  for filePath := range ch {
   //upload file here
  }

}

func SaveToFile(uartData []string) filePath string {

    return filePath
}

func main() {


    ch := make(chan string, 1000)
    defer close(ch)
    go SendFile(<-ch)

    uart := uartInit()


    for {

        data := uart.Read(buf)
        uartData = strings.Split(string(buf), " ")
        ch <- SaveToFile(uartData)

    }
}

  • as you are ranging over your channel it will be something like a infinite loop(it will be blocking when its empty).The defer close(ch) will make sure that "SendFile" goroutine stops. (play.golang.org/p/og5DnPzlu1I) – Siva Guru Aug 14 at 17:11
  • @SivaGuru thanks for the reply. So, is there a difference between defer close(queue) and close(queue) in the example you sent? I just tested it and the defer close(queue) causes a deadlock at runtime. – user11856505 Aug 15 at 2:21
  • Well defer makes sure that a command gets executed when the function returns or at the end of the function. In the example using defer is bad as the function won't return. Close(queue) will close the channel instantly.. Defer close(queue) will close when the function returns. As the function won't return it will be in a deadlock. In your example you can use defer – Siva Guru Aug 15 at 3:48
  • @SivaGuru thank you for the explanation. Thumbs up! – user11856505 Aug 15 at 4:49

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