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I solved a variation of the knapsack problem by backtracking all of the possible solutions. Basically 0 means that item is not in the backpack, 1 means that the item is in the backpack. Cost is the value of all items in the backpack, we are trying to achieve the lowest value possible while having items of every "class". Each time that a combination of all classes is found, I calculate the value of all items and if it's lower than globalBestValue, I save the value. I do this is verify().

Now I'm trying to optimise my recusive backtrack. My idea was to iterate over my array as it's being generated and return the generator if the "cost" of my generated numbers is already higher then my current best-value, therefore the combination currently being generated can't be the new best-value and can be skipped.

However with my optimisation, my backtrack is not generating all the values and it actually skips the "best" value I'm trying to find. Could you tell me where's the problem?

private int globalBestValue = Integer.MAX_VALUE;
private int[] arr;


public KnapSack(int numberOfItems) {
    arr = new int[numberOfItems];
}

private void generate(int fromIndex) {
    int currentCost = 0; // my optimisation starts here
    for (int i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
        if (currentCost > globalBestValue) {
            return;
        }
        if (arr[i] == 1) {
            currentCost += allCosts.get(i);
        }
    } // ends here
    if (fromIndex == arr.length) {
        verify();
        return;
    }
    for (int i = 0; i <= 1; i++) {
        arr[fromIndex] = i;
        generate(fromIndex + 1);
    }
}

public void verify() {
            // skipped the code verifying the arr if it's correct, it's long and not relevant
            if (isCorrect == true && currentValue < globalBestValue) {
                globalBestValue = currentValue;
            }else{
                return;
            }
}
  • There's a lot of code missing like the definitions of arr, allCosts, verifiy() etc. - so you might need to post a minimal reproducible example. However you actually seem to be looking for an optimization algorithm so you might search for that. Just note that there are exact algorithms that might be costlier in terms of memory and time as well as heuristic algorithms that don't cost that much but might not be able to find the best solution - just a "good enough" one. – Thomas Aug 14 at 12:30
  • I further assume currectCost > globalBestValue is a typo and you mean currentCost > globalBestValue. Also we'd need to know how globalBestValue is set, i.e. if it is 0 or could contain only partial costs then this might be your problem. – Thomas Aug 14 at 12:33
  • @Thomas Hi, I fixed the typo and added a lot of code that should help you further understand my code. Skipped some parts of verify(), as it's over 30 lines and not relevant to the problem, but otherwise it's complete. – Jack Aug 14 at 12:40
  • There are still some relevant parts missing, e.g. what is allCosts? How is currentValue calculated? However, I suspect the problem is if(currentCost > globalBestValue) - do you really want to compare the costs with the value? I'm quite sure about what variation of the problem you're trying to solve but I'd assume that the value is meant to get higher while the cost is meant to get lower. The best solution might actually have higher costs than the current best's value so it would be skipped. Wouldn't you want to compare value vs. value and cost vs. cost? – Thomas Aug 14 at 12:53
  • @Thomas Sorry, that's just my translation. I didn't share all the code, because the problem lies in generation, not in values. The problem is, that with my optimisation, the backtracking actually skips the best value, which is [1,0,0,1]. – Jack Aug 14 at 12:58
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  1. Pardon my bluntness, but your efforts at optimizing an inefficient algorithm can only be described as polishing the turd. You will not solve a knapsack problem of any decent size by brute force, and early return isn't enough. I have mentioned one approach to writing an efficient program on CodeReview SE; it requires a considerable effort, but you gotta do what you gotta do.
  2. Having said that, I'd recommend you write the arr to console in order to troubleshoot the sequence. It looks like when you go back to the index i-1, the element at i remains set to 1, and you estimate the upper bound instead of the lower one. The following change might work: replace your code

    for (int i = 0; i <= 1; i++) {
        arr[fromIndex] = i;
        generate(fromIndex + 1);
    }
    

    with

    arr[fromIndex] = 1;
    generate(fromIndex + 1);
    arr[fromIndex] = 0;
    generate(fromIndex + 1);
    

This turns it into a sort of greedy algorithm: instead of starting with 0000000, you effectively start with 1111111. And obviously, when you store the globalBestValue, you should store the actual data which gives it. But the main advice is: when your algorithm behaves weirdly, tracing is your friend.

  • Thanks. I know that bruteforcing isn't the most optimal way, but what I'm looking for with this project is just optimising backtrack, not turning backtrack into dynamic programming. I fixed my optimisation by running the first loop from 0 to fromIndex. This optimisation halved the number of all my recursive calls. Will look into your code too. Thanks again – Jack Aug 15 at 14:50

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