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I have a scenario where I have 2 tables like below

groups

id| name
1 | Group 1
2 | Group 2
3 | Group 3


users

id| name | group_id | sub_status
1 | John | 1        | Active
2 | Doe  | 1        | Inactive
3 | Simon| 2        | Active
4 | David| 3        | Active

Now I need to select the groups with active or inactive subscription statuses. Like if I am looking for Active groups, any single I should get Group1, Group2 and Group3 as a result as there is one Active subscription in Group 1. And if I query for Inactive groups, I should get null because Group1 has one active subscription

  • What is the question? Does something not work? – kerbholz Aug 14 at 13:18
  • I think I understand your Specification, but if you show us the expected output based on the input and criteria as a list of rows required it would make it more obvious – RiggsFolly Aug 14 at 13:18
  • @kerbholz Looking for a query here – baig772 Aug 14 at 13:20
  • this should produce inactive groups: select name from groups where id not in (select group_id from users where sub_status='Active'); I don't think this should an answer, tho. – Tano Fotang Aug 14 at 13:20
2

You can count up active and inactive records by each group. After that, you can filter groups by that count. For example, you can find active groups with the following query

SELECT 
 groups.id,
 groups.name,
 sum(IF(users.sub_status = 'Active', 1, 0)) as active_count 
 sum(IF(users.sub_status = 'Inactive', 1, 0)) as inactive_count  
FROM groups
LEFT JOIN users ON users.group_id = group.id
GROUP BY groups.id, groups.name
HAVING active_count > 0

and inactive groups:

SELECT 
 groups.id,
 groups.name,
 sum(IF(users.sub_status = 'Active', 1, 0)) as active_count 
 sum(IF(users.sub_status = 'Inactive', 1, 0)) as inactive_count  
FROM groups
LEFT JOIN users ON users.group_id = group.id
GROUP BY groups.id, groups.name
HAVING active_count = 0
  • 1
    Shouldn't it be SUM instead of COUNT ? – Pepper Aug 14 at 13:26
  • @Pepper yes it was the mistake. I fixed it. Thanks! – Maxim Fedorov Aug 14 at 13:28
  • Is there a reason why you need to take count? Shouldn't it be enough to just look for the existence of records that are 'active' (IF EXISTS) or 'inactive' (IF NOT EXISTS)? – Tano Fotang Aug 14 at 13:50
1

You don't need to join the tables.
With EXISTS for active groups:

select g.* from groups g
where exists (
  select 1 from users
  where group_id = g.id and sub_status = 'Active'
);

and NOT EXISTS for inactive groups:

select g.* from groups g
where not exists (
  select 1 from users
  where group_id = g.id and sub_status = 'Active'
);

See the demo.

  • this seems a more correct answer. I have deleted mine for the reason you pointed out. – Tano Fotang Aug 14 at 13:39
0

I suppose you need such a query :

select g.id, 
       case when count(case when u.sub_status = 'Inactive' then 1 end)=1 and 
                 count(case when u.sub_status = 'Active' then 1 end) > 0
            then
         null
       else  
         g.name
       end inactive_case,
       case when count(case when u.sub_status = 'Active' then 1 end) = 1 then
         g.name
       end active_case
  from groups g
  left join users u on u.group_id = g.id
 group by g.id, g.name;

 id inactive_case   active_case
 1                  Group 1
 2  Group 2         Group 2
 3  Group 3         Group 3

Demo

0

You can use aggregation for this:

For active groups:

select u.group_id
from users u
group by u.group_id
having min(u.sub_status) = 'active';    -- any active member

And for inactive:

select u.group_id
from users u
group by u.group_id
having min(u.sub_status) = 'inactive';  -- all inactive

This uses the fact that 'active' > 'inactive'. I would recommend using a 0/1 value instead of a string for this purpose.

  • where is field status from? – Tano Fotang Aug 14 at 14:19

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