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Here x is any decimal number. What does this expression mean?

return ( (x & 0x0000FFFF)<<16 | (x & 0xFFFF0000)>>16 );
  • Sorry wrong link :(. I removed it – Kampi Aug 15 '19 at 6:40
  • There are no decimal integer types in C. Integers are binary. – Antti Haapala Aug 15 '19 at 6:45
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    here x is a number which is given by usar – Pranto Saha Aug 15 '19 at 6:52
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    The answer will be made obvious by reading about the bitwise operators in your beginner-level C programming book. This is fundamental stuff, SO is not a replacement for basic studies. – Lundin Aug 15 '19 at 6:53
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    Ok here is the short answer the above code will most likely return 0 if x is of type short int. – Lee Aug 15 '19 at 6:58
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They are using bitwise operations to manipulate the variable x which is assumed to be of a type of 32 bits so probably an integer.

(x & 0x0000FFFF )<< 16 | (x & 0xFFFF0000) >> 16 

Lets break it down: (x & 0x0000FFFF) << 16 : will take the value of the last 2 bytes in X and bit shift them by 16 to the left which will effectively move the last 2 bytes in the expression x to the first 2 bytes.

(x & 0xFFFF0000) >> 16 : will do the exact opposite of the first and move the 2 first bytes to the place of the last 2 bytes.

In more detail: the (x & 0xFFFF0000 ) is resulting in a value of he first 2 bytes since the & operator will only match 1 to 1 and otherwise result in 0 on a bit level, since we have only ones on a bit level in the first 2 bytes in the expression 0xFFFF0000 we will get the value of the 2 first bytes. The shift operators will move the resulting value 16 steps to the left/right depending on the direction of the <> operators.

The | operator will merge the two expressions into a single value which is the x value where the 2 first bytes has become the 2 last and vice versa.

An example to clarify the actions.

x = 0x12345678
(x & 0x0000FFFF) // will result in 0x00005678
0x0000FFFF << 16  //will result in 0x56780000
// The other parenthesis is doing the exact same but opposite. Which will result in 0x00001234
The final part of the expression will look like this: 
0x56780000 | 0x00001234 // which will result in 0x56781234

More info on bitwise operators and their effects can be found here: https://fresh2refresh.com/c-programming/c-operators-expressions/c-bit-wise-operators/

| improve this answer | |
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    "will take the value of the last 4 bytes" - Those are 2 bytes – StoryTeller - Unslander Monica Aug 15 '19 at 7:15
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    haha correct, 2 bytes! 64 since I made the calculation error of 4 bytes instead of 2 :) – Mattemagikern Aug 15 '19 at 9:13
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uint32_t lo_16_bits = (x & 0x0000FFFF);
uint32_t hi_16_bits = (x & 0xFFFF0000);
uint32_t move_lo_bits_to_hi_bits = lo_16_bits << 16;
uint32_t move_hi_bits_to_lo_bits = hi_16_bits >> 16;
uint32_t recombined = move_lo_bits_to_hi_bits | move_hi_bits_to_lo_bits;

The code is simply swapping the lowest 16bits with the highest 16bits.

| improve this answer | |
  • Only when using 32bit for more then 32 bits it will not swap with the highest 16 bit also for less than 32bit it will swap with less than 16 bit. – Lee Aug 15 '19 at 7:33

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