26

I wish to be able to perform python debugging using print() or similar method where it prints the passed expression in addition to the usual output.

For instance, for the following code:

print(42 + 42)
print(type(list))
print(datetime.now())

Current Output:

84
<class 'type'>
2019-08-15 22:43:57.805861

Expected Output:

42 + 42 : 84
type(list) : <class 'type'>
datetime.now() : 2019-08-15 22:43:57.805861

Currently, the same can be achieved by manually adding the expression string, (not so elegant imho and violates DRY principle).

print("42 + 42 : ", 42 + 42)
print("type(list) : ", type(list))
print("datetime.now() : ", datetime.now())

I've tried to override builtin print, but without success:

import builtins
def print(*args, **kwargs):
    return builtins.print(*args, **kwargs)  # passed expression isn't available here as string!

Is there a way to achieve this? Thanks!

  • 1
    You might want to check the logging module for information: docs.python.org/2/howto/logging.html – Celius Stingher Aug 15 '19 at 17:39
  • 1
    Python passes function arguments by value and all arguments have to be evaluated before the print function is called. So when you try print(type(list)) what's actually evaluated is print(type) (because type(list) evaluates to type). Thus the expression will never be available to you as a string. – pault Aug 15 '19 at 17:42
  • With logging you can probably write custom code so your logs output the line itself? To look something like this: INFO "logger.info(3 + 3)" 6 – Sergio Pulgarin Aug 15 '19 at 17:45
19

f-strings will support something like this in Python 3.8 (currently in beta).

From the docs:

An f-string such as f'{expr=}' will expand to the text of the expression, an equal sign, then the representation of the evaluated expression. For example:

>>> user = 'eric_idle'
>>> member_since = date(1975, 7, 31)
>>> f'{user=} {member_since=}'
"user='eric_idle' member_since=datetime.date(1975, 7, 31)"

The usual f-string format specifiers allow more control over how the result of the expression is displayed:

>>> delta = date.today() - member_since
>>> f'{user=!s}  {delta.days=:,d}'
'user=eric_idle  delta.days=16,075'

The = specifier will display the whole expression so that calculations can be shown:

>>> print(f'{theta=}  {cos(radians(theta))=:.3f}')
theta=30  cos(radians(theta))=0.866
11

Generally I think if you find yourself using eval there's probably a better way to do what you're trying to do, but:

for statement in ["42 + 42", "type(list)", "datetime.now()"]:
    print("{} : {}".format(statement, eval(statement))
9

You could define a superprint function and have it print then evaluate a string:

from datetime import datetime

def superprint(str):
    print(str," : ",eval(str))

a = "42 + 42"
b = "type(list)"
c = "datetime.now()"
superprint(a)
superprint(b)
superprint(c)

OUTPUT

42 + 42  :  84
type(list)  :  <class 'type'>
datetime.now()  :  2019-08-15 14:44:43.072780

If you can live with tossing everything you want to print in quotation marks this could work for you.

8
+50

You can use the module inspect to obtain the source line (code_context) from the caller:

from inspect import getframeinfo, currentframe


def vprint(value):
    caller = currentframe().f_back
    info = getframeinfo(caller)
    label = ''.join(info.code_context).strip()
    label = label.replace('vprint(', '')[:-1].strip()
    print(label, '=', value)


>>> vprint(12 + 3)
12 + 3 = 15
>>> vprint(type(list))
type(list) = <type 'type'>
>>> vprint(lambda x: x + 1)
lambda x: x + 1 = <function <lambda> at 0x7f93c104b9b0>

Will work well for single-line evaluations only. Since code_context returns only the executed line (and not the whole instruction), this may happen:

>>> vprint([''] +
...:     ['a', 'b'])
['a', 'b'] = ['', 'a', 'b']
>>> vprint(math.log(
...:   2 * math.pi))
2 * math.pi) = 1.83787706641

Note: breaking line with \ fixes this (indentation will still look weird though):

>>> vprint(math.log( \
...:   2 * math.pi))
math.log(   2 * math.pi) = 1.83787706641
  • For vprint(12 + 3), Your function is printing : vprint(12 + 3) = 15. Please check. – Sagar Gupta Aug 26 '19 at 17:00
  • @SagarGuptaFTW Sorry, I had made this change to my code and forgot to update here. It's a bit manual, but it's just an example. – augustomen Aug 26 '19 at 19:05
  • Thanks for editing, wonderful :) Can you share a few cases where it might not work as expected since you said it works for single-line evaluations only. – Sagar Gupta Aug 27 '19 at 6:32
  • Thanks for adding examples! I think you should replace only the first instance of 'print(' so that it looks better for a case like print(print("Test")). Just a hypothetical example. – Sagar Gupta Aug 28 '19 at 10:42
4

When you call print method, passed arguments are not evaluated by print method, they are evaluated before passing to print method as argument.

print(42 + 42)  => print(84)
print(type(list)) => print(<type 'type'>)
print(datetime.now()) => print(datetime.datetime(2019, 8, 15, 23, 9, 50, 619157))

Internally print method just converts the given object to string by calling __str__() method of object passed

  • Thanks for the insight. This doesn't answer the question. – Sagar Gupta Aug 27 '19 at 6:34
3

You can use https://github.com/cool-RR/PySnooper

In [1]: from datetime import datetime                                                                                                                                                                                                         

In [2]: import pysnooper                                                                                                                                                                                                                      

In [3]: @pysnooper.snoop() 
   ...: def output(): 
   ...:     print(42 + 42) 
   ...:     print(type(list)) 
   ...:     print(datetime.now()) 
   ...:                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

In [4]: output()                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
Source path:... <ipython-input-3-d5732f8e9c36>
22:14:08.934915 call         2 def output():
22:14:08.935031 line         3     print(42 + 42)
84
22:14:08.935061 line         4     print(type(list))
<class 'type'>
22:14:08.935083 line         5     print(datetime.now())
2019-08-25 22:14:08.935100
22:14:08.935109 return       5     print(datetime.now())
Return value:.. None
3

Using Augusto Men's Answer as a foundation, following overrides python's builtin print() method. This will help in performing debugging without requiring any changes in code-under-test whatsoever, just add this function definition on top of any file and it will work.

from inspect import getframeinfo, currentframe
import builtins

def print(*args, **kwargs):
    info = getframeinfo(currentframe().f_back)
    label = ''.join(info.code_context).strip()
    label = label.replace('print(', '', 1)[:-1].strip()  # (optional)
    return builtins.print(label, ':', *args, **kwargs)

print(42 + 42)
print(type(list))
print(datetime.now())
print([i for i in range(5)])
if 1 < 2: print('True')

Output:

42 + 42 : 84
type(list) : <class 'type'>
datetime.now() : 2019-08-28 16:00:10.812306
[i for i in range(5)] : [0, 1, 2, 3, 4]
if 1 < 2: 'True' : True
2

Edit: Sorry, my answer is not really right, please see @Augusto Men.

Well, nothing is impossible in Python, but using eval can not always work:

import inspect
from datetime import datetime

def my_print(a):
    assert(callable(a))
    source = inspect.getsource(a).replace("my_print(lambda:", "").strip()[:-1]
    print(source + " : " + str(a()))

# pass lambda function to my_print
print("my_print_result:")
my_print(lambda: 42 + 42)
my_print(lambda: type(list))
my_print(lambda: datetime.now())


def eval_print(s):
    print(s + " : " + str(eval(s)))

# another way is passing string to eval_print
# but eval has its own special evaluation rules
# which will not work as expected when used in function
print("\neval_print result:")
eval_print("42 + 42")
eval_print("type(list)")
eval_print("datetime.now()")

def test():
    local_test_1 = 1
    my_print(lambda: local_test_1 + local_test_1)
    eval_print("local_test_1 + local_test_1")

print("\ntest in function:")
test()

output:

my_print_result:
42 + 42 : 84
type(list) : <class 'type'>
datetime.now() : 2019-08-26 07:06:30.550408

eval_print result:
42 + 42 : 84
type(list) : <class 'type'>
datetime.now() : 2019-08-26 07:06:30.551110

test in function:
local_test_1 + local_test_1 : 2
NameError: name 'local_test_1' is not defined

When use eval in function, we will have NameError, because eval in Python has special rule:

The eval() and exec() functions do not have access to the full environment for resolving names. Names may be resolved in the local and global namespaces of the caller. Free variables are not resolved in the nearest enclosing namespace, but in the global namespace.

referenced from 4. Execution model — Python 3.7.4 documentation

  • 1
    this is actually an interesting answer, in fact, the first answer to suggest using inspect to solve the question. But why does your answer insist on using lambda when it can be avoided, see Augusto Men's answer. – Sagar Gupta Aug 27 '19 at 6:14
  • @SagarGuptaFTW Thanks for comment. Because I just the idea that inspect can solve this problem, but I am not very familiar with inspect API. So, I only get it work with lambda. Sorry... – LiuXiMin Aug 27 '19 at 6:22
  • No need to be sorry man, I really liked your approach and beautifully written answer. It's just that his answer uses your foundation and refined it for a neater way. This answer is indeed very useful :) Cheers! – Sagar Gupta Aug 27 '19 at 6:30
1

Just use traceback and search for call argument.

The advantage of this solution is that you don't have to put the expression in parenthesis.

import re
import traceback
def prnt_expression(expression):
    for s in traceback.format_stack():
        match = re.search('prnt_expression\((.*)\)', s)
        if match:
            expression_string = match.group(1)
            break
    print(f'{expression_string} : {expression}')

call it like this:

prnt_expression(42 + 42)

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