67

I'm getting this message in the console when running a server-side Blazor app:

Error: There was an unhandled exception on the current circuit, so this circuit will be terminated. For more details turn on detailed exceptions in 'CircuitOptions.DetailedErrors'

I've had a look at the Blazor error handling documentation, but I can't work out how to actually turn on the detailed errors mentioned in that message?

5 Answers 5

76

More digging on this revealed that there are both non-Blazor specific .NET Core ways to turn on Detailed Errors, and also a Blazor specific approach:

The modern approach

The methods I detail below date from the .NET 2.1 era and things have improved a lot since then. Tyson Gibby's answer is a better way to handle this in general now, so I've changed that to the accepted answer.

I've left the two approaches below for historic reference anyone needing answers for earlier versions of Blazor.

[Outdated] The general .NET Core way to turn on Detailed Errors:

There are a number of ways to get the detailed errors as discussed in the .NET Core documentation, but I ended up using the Detailed Errors setting:

WebHost.CreateDefaultBuilder(args).UseSetting(WebHostDefaults.DetailedErrorsKey, "true")

And the Development Environment setting:

WebHost.CreateDefaultBuilder(args).UseEnvironment(Environments.Development)

Both of those are used in Program.cs:

If you are using the older (and eventually to be deprecated IWebHostBuilder approach) that looks like this:

public static IWebHostBuilder CreateWebHostBuilder(string[] args) =>
    WebHost.CreateDefaultBuilder(args)
        .UseSetting(WebHostDefaults.DetailedErrorsKey, "true")
        //.UseEnvironment(EnvironmentName.Development)
        .UseStartup<Startup>();

And if you're using the newer IHostBuilder approach that was introduced with Core 2.1 that looks like this:

public static IHostBuilder CreateHostBuilder(string[] args) =>
    Host.CreateDefaultBuilder(args)
        .ConfigureWebHostDefaults(webBuilder =>
        {
            webBuilder
                .UseStartup<Startup>()
                .UseSetting(WebHostDefaults.DetailedErrorsKey, "true")
                //.UseEnvironment(EnvironmentName.Development);
        });

Once I set that I got more details about my misfiring Blazor code.

[Outdated] A Blazor specific approach:

An alternative approach for turning on detailed errors can also be found in this answer, which includes this code:

services.AddServerSideBlazor().AddCircuitOptions(options => {  options.DetailedErrors = true; });

This approach can then be expanded to include a check for whether the code is being run in the development environment

services.AddServerSideBlazor().AddCircuitOptions(o =>
{
    //only add details when debugging
    o.DetailedErrors = _env.IsDevelopment();
});

as highlighted by @Eonasdan's answer below

14
  • 1
    EnvironmentName.Development Commented Aug 29, 2019 at 16:23
  • oops I posted too soon, was going to say VS recommends using Environments.Development rather than EnvironmentName.Development which is marked as obsolete Commented Aug 29, 2019 at 22:22
  • @SimonFoster thank you, I hadn't spotted that. I've updated the answer to use that.
    – tomRedox
    Commented Aug 31, 2019 at 12:33
  • 1
    This is super useful. Another approach could also be to just #if DEBUG the additional line so that the enhanced errors are disabled in a release build.
    – Webreaper
    Commented Oct 15, 2019 at 7:03
  • 1
    How to obtain _env (a IWebHostEnvironment) in the ConfigureServices method?
    – hybrid2102
    Commented Oct 16, 2019 at 8:09
65

NO CODE : EASIER & More SECURE

Best Practice

This is easier than most of the proposed solutions and it does not introduce a possible security issue into the code. It is also considered a coding best practice.

Microsoft recommends adding the following to the appsettings.development.json file as it does not add code to the application that can become a security risk. It is not recommended to put this in appsettings.json as that settings file is reserved for the production environment.

You can also use this approach to provide detailed error logging for SignalR.

src: Handle errors in ASP.NET Core Blazor apps: Detailed circuit errors

{
  "DetailedErrors": true, // turns on CircuitOptions.DetailedErrors
  "Logging": {
    "LogLevel": {
      "Default": "Information",
      "Microsoft": "Warning",
      "Microsoft.Hosting.Lifetime": "Information",
      "Microsoft.AspNetCore.SignalR": "Debug"  // turns on SignalR debugging
    }
  }
}
11
  • 4
    This should be the accepted answer.
    – Greg Gum
    Commented Apr 1, 2022 at 12:10
  • 1
    This one is systematic solution. I go this way.
    – Honza P.
    Commented May 20, 2022 at 14:52
  • What makes you say Microsoft recommends config over code? On the page you linked they don't. They describe config as an alternative to code, after the code solution.
    – Kissaki
    Commented Sep 11, 2023 at 14:04
  • What is the supposed "security issue in the code"? If it's merely about environment and detail exposure, obviously you have to be correct just like on the config. It's no different on the config where you have to put it into the dev config specifically to not expose it on prod.
    – Kissaki
    Commented Sep 11, 2023 at 14:04
  • @Kissaki if you add debugging to your code then it is in all environments, not just in dev. This opens the possibility of anyone being able to see your debug information and gather information about your application that could allow them to exploit your code. You could add additional code that only runs the debug code when you are in dev, but this can become complicated and difficult to maintain, again presenting the possibility of possible vulnerabilities. Commented Sep 11, 2023 at 16:43
20

A better way to add detailed errors is to check your environment first. In Startup.cs add IWebHostEnvironment env to your constructor.

Then you can do this:

services.AddServerSideBlazor().AddCircuitOptions(o =>
{
    if (_env.IsDevelopment()) //only add details when debugging
    {
        o.DetailedErrors = true;
    }
});
1
  • That's a really good point and an important one from a security point of view. I've updated my answer accordingly
    – tomRedox
    Commented Sep 17, 2019 at 13:18
5

For .NET Core 6 you can use WebApplicationBuilder.

var builder = WebApplication.CreateBuilder(args);
if (builder.Environment.IsDevelopment())
{
    builder.Services.AddServerSideBlazor().AddCircuitOptions(x => x.DetailedErrors = true);
}
else
{
    builder.Services.AddServerSideBlazor();
}
1
3

For me it was slightly different

public static IHostBuilder CreateHostBuilder(string[] args) =>
    Host.CreateDefaultBuilder(args)
        .ConfigureWebHostDefaults(webBuilder =>
        {
            webBuilder.UseSetting(WebHostDefaults.DetailedErrorsKey, "true");
            webBuilder.UseStartup<Startup>();
        });
1
  • Different to what? Did this make Blazor use detailed error reports too, or only asp.net?
    – Kissaki
    Commented Sep 11, 2023 at 14:10

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