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I've always assumed that an object begins and ends its lifetime in the same memory location, but I've recently come across a scenario where I need to be sure. Specifically, I'm looking for a guarantee from the standard that no matter what optimizations the compiler performs the address an object is constructed at is the same one that it will have its destructor called from... and that its destructor is, indeed, guaranteed to be called from that location unless the program is terminating.

I've always taken this stuff for granted, but upon closer examination I can't find a guarantee, and there's some language around copy and move elision that I'm not sure how to interpret. I'm hoping that some of the more standards-conversant people here can point me to chapter and verse.

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  • 1
    This is not C. I think it's UB to assume anything about the address of an object. What if there's a garbage collector?
    – Jazzwave06
    Commented Aug 15, 2019 at 20:28
  • That is absolutely not true. Commented Aug 15, 2019 at 20:29
  • 2
    @sturcotte06 garbage collectors are not allowed to change the address of a living object. (because if they did, they would break any code that was holding a pointer to that object's original location. All the garbage collector can do is free up the memory of objects that no longer have anything pointing to them) Commented Aug 15, 2019 at 20:33
  • You can have effects that LOOK like the address changed, Iterator invalidation in a container, for example. Commented Aug 15, 2019 at 21:02

3 Answers 3

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What you are looking for is defined in [intro.object]/1

[...] An object occupies a region of storage in its period of construction ([class.cdtor]), throughout its lifetime, and in its period of destruction ([class.cdtor]).

This means the address cannot change as long as you can access it.

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  • This would have to be so: take class, "House," which has as a member a pointer to a class, "Street," which is assigned at some point after a Street object has been created. If the address of the Street object changed, how would you go through all the (potentially huge number) of House objects to change the value of its Street pointer? Commented Aug 15, 2019 at 20:33
  • Wow, fast and precise. Can you perchance shed any light on the destructor question? Specifically, [[basic.life]/5](timsong-cpp.github.io/cppwp/basic.life#5) seems to indicate that there are scenarios where the destructor might not be called due to direct storage reusage or release, but destructors with side-effects are obviously a thing people use, and I can't square those facts in my head. Commented Aug 15, 2019 at 20:41
  • @Adrian I could imagine a situation in which the compiler, as an optimization, would allow the address of the Street to change, but only if it knows there are no outstanding references to it. Commented Aug 15, 2019 at 20:43
  • @ReidRankin For objects with automatic storage, their destructor is guaranteed to be called when going out of scope. For objects with dynamic storage duration, you have to call delete/delete[] for the destructor to be called. for objects with static storage duration the destructor is called at the end of the program. All that said, there is the as if rule so if there is no side effect to destructing something, the compiler doesn't actually have to call the destructor. Commented Aug 15, 2019 at 20:47
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    @MaximEgorushkin a is singular, so it only has one location. Commented Aug 15, 2019 at 21:23
1

Specifically, I'm looking for a guarantee from the standard that no matter what optimizations the compiler performs the address an object is constructed at is the same one that it will have its destructor called from...

and that its destructor is, indeed, guaranteed to be called from that location unless the program is terminating.

The standard guarantees both for automatic variables and static variables as long as one doesn't do bad things with the objects. However, it does not guarantee either for objects allocated from the free store.

Even for automatic variables, a crafty programmer can subvert the intention through pointer manipulation and explicitly calling the destructor through a pointer.

In addition, the wrong destructor will be called when delete-ing a base class pointer when the base class does not have a virtual destructor. This will be a programming error, not the result of intention to subvert.

Example:

struct Base
{
   int b;
};

struct Derived : virtual Base
{
   float d;
};


int main()
{
   {
      Derived d1; // Not a problem.
   }

   {
      Derived d1;
      Derived* ptr = &d1;
      delete ptr;    // Bad. The programmer subverts the program.
                     // Must not use delete.
   }

   {
      Derived* d2 = new Derived; // The destructor does not get called automatically.
   }

   {
      Derived* d2 = new Derived;
      delete d2;   // OK. The proper destructor gets called.
   }

   {
      Derived* d2 = new Derived;
      Base* ptr = d2;
      delete ptr;  // Programmer error. The wrong destructor gets called.
   }
}
2
  • I should perhaps clarify, then, that I'm not interested in cases where the programmer is being crafty--only in cases where the compiler author is. Let's assume that there's no inheritance involved. Commented Aug 15, 2019 at 20:47
  • @ReidRankin, what you asking for is guaranteed for automatic variables and static variables. It's not guaranteed for objects from the free store. The last use case in my answer is tricky -- it's a programming error without the intention to subvert.
    – R Sahu
    Commented Aug 15, 2019 at 20:51
-1

As mentioned by Nathan Oliver, the standard states that:

[...] An object occupies a region of storage in its period of construction ([class.cdtor]), throughout its lifetime, and in its period of destruction ([class.cdtor]).

Compilers respect this, and there are objects (similar to the one you describe) for which it must hold true. Consider std::mutex. A mutex cannot be copied or moved, and the reason for this is that it must remain at the same location in memory for the duration of it's lifetime in order to work.

So how does copy/move elision work?

Copy/move elision works by creating the object where it needs to go. It's that simple.

We can see this behavior for ourselves:

#include <iostream>

struct Foo {
    Foo() {
        std::cout << "I am at " << (void*)this << '\n';
    }
    // Delete copy and move, to ensure it cannot be moved
    Foo(const Foo&) = delete;
    Foo(Foo&&) = delete;
};

Foo getFoo() {
    return Foo(); 
}

int main() {

    Foo* ptr = new Foo(getFoo()); 

    std::cout << "Foo ptr is at " << (void*)ptr << '\n';
    delete ptr; 
}

This code outputs:

I am at 0x201ee70
Foo ptr is at 0x201ee70

And we see that Foo remains at the same location for the duration of it's lifetime, without ever being copied or moved, even though it's being created in dynamically allocated memory.

How does the compiler know where to create an object?

If a function returns a type that is not trivially copyable, then that function takes an implicit parameter representing the memory address where it's supposed to construct the return value.

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