37

I am new to SwiftUI (like most people) and trying to figure out how to remove some whitespace above a List that I embedded in a NavigationView

In this image, you can see that there is some white space above the List

Current Version

What I want to accomplish is this

Ideal Version

I've tried using

.navigationBarHidden(true)

but this did not make any noticeable changes.

i'm currently setting up my navigiationView like this

 NavigationView {
                FileBrowserView(jsonFromCall: URLRetrieve(URLtoFetch: applicationDelegate.apiURL))
                    .navigationBarHidden(true)
                }

where FileBrowserView is a view with a List and Cells defined like this

List {
   Section(header: Text("Root")){
    FileCell(name: "Test", fileType: "JPG",fileDesc: "Test number 1")

                    FileCell(name: "Test 2", fileType: "txt",fileDesc: "Test number 2")
                    FileCell(name: "test3", fileType: "fasta", fileDesc: "")
}
}

I do want to note that the ultimate goal here is that you will be able to click on these cells to navigate deeper into a file tree and thus should display a Back button on the bar on deeper navigation, but I do not want anything at the top as such during my initial view.

10 Answers 10

63

For some reason, SwiftUI requires that you also set .navigationBarTitle for .navigationBarHidden to work properly.

NavigationView {
    FileBrowserView(jsonFromCall: URLRetrieve(URLtoFetch: applicationDelegate.apiURL))
        .navigationBarTitle("")
        .navigationBarHidden(true)
}

Update

As @Peacemoon pointed out in the comments, the navigation bar remains hidden as you navigate deeper in the navigation stack, regardless of whether or not you set navigationBarHidden to false in subsequent views. As I said in the comments, this is either a result of poor implementation on Apple's part or just dreadful documentation (who knows, maybe there is a "correct" way to accomplish this).

Whatever the case, I came up with a workaround that seems to produce the original poster's desired results. I'm hesitant to recommend it because it seems unnecessarily hacky, but without any straightforward way of hiding and unhiding the navigation bar, this is the best I could do.

This example uses three views - View1 has a hidden navigation bar, and View2 and View3 both have visible navigation bars with titles.

struct View1: View {
    @State var isNavigationBarHidden: Bool = true

    var body: some View {
        NavigationView {
            ZStack {
                Color.red
                NavigationLink("View 2", destination: View2(isNavigationBarHidden: self.$isNavigationBarHidden))
            }
            .navigationBarTitle("Hidden Title")
            .navigationBarHidden(self.isNavigationBarHidden)
            .onAppear {
                self.isNavigationBarHidden = true
            }
        }
    }
}

struct View2: View {
    @Binding var isNavigationBarHidden: Bool

    var body: some View {
        ZStack {
            Color.green
            NavigationLink("View 3", destination: View3())
        }
        .navigationBarTitle("Visible Title 1")
        .onAppear {
            self.isNavigationBarHidden = false
        }
    }
}

struct View3: View {
    var body: some View {
        Color.blue
            .navigationBarTitle("Visible Title 2")
    }
}

Setting navigationBarHidden to false on views deeper in the navigation stack doesn't seem to properly override the preference of the view that originally set navigationBarHidden to true, so the only workaround I could come up with was using a binding to change the preference of the original view when a new view is pushed onto the navigation stack.

Like I said, this is a hacky solution, but without an official solution from Apple, this is the best that I've been able to come up with.

|improve this answer|||||
  • 4
    This fixed my issue! That is very strange that you have to have a title before you can hide the navigation bar... – Vapidant Aug 16 '19 at 13:32
  • 4
    The bug is still there outside of beta :/ – Daniel Ryan Oct 16 '19 at 2:46
  • 1
    You're a lifesaver! – Ken Mueller Oct 23 '19 at 20:01
  • 1
    totally agree with you that the documentation is really unhelpful. Thank you for your investigation, looks quite hacky :) – Peacemoon Oct 25 '19 at 7:54
  • 1
    @SambitPrakash I’ve never really nested a TabView inside a NavigationView before, and Apple doesn’t seem to nest them that way in their apps as far as I can tell. It’s never been completely clear to me if nesting a TabView inside a NavigationView is intended to be done at all, and I know that SwiftUI has had some weird bugs that pop up when you nest them that way. TabViews have always felt like a higher level form of navigation than NavigationViews to me. If you instead nest the NavigationView inside the TabView, I believe my workaround should still work. – graycampbell Nov 1 '19 at 4:54
9

The purpose of a NavigationView is to add the navigation bar on top of your view. In iOS, there are 2 kinds of navigation bars: large and standard.

enter image description here

If you want no navigation bar:

FileBrowserView(jsonFromCall: URLRetrieve(URLtoFetch: applicationDelegate.apiURL))

If you want a large navigation bar (generally used for your top-level views):

NavigationView {
    FileBrowserView(jsonFromCall: URLRetrieve(URLtoFetch: applicationDelegate.apiURL))
    .navigationBarTitle(Text("Title"))
}

If you want a standard (inline) navigation bar (generally used for sub-level views):

NavigationView {
    FileBrowserView(jsonFromCall: URLRetrieve(URLtoFetch: applicationDelegate.apiURL))
    .navigationBarTitle(Text("Title"), displayMode: .inline)
}

Hope this answer will help you.

More information: Apple Documentation

|improve this answer|||||
  • 10
    There are reasons why you might want to hide the navigation bar while also maintaining the functionality of a NavigationView. The purpose of a NavigationView is not solely to display a navigation bar. – graycampbell Aug 16 '19 at 2:43
  • 2
    I want the NavigiationView for the functionality of navigating in the stack and having the ability to go back from views easily, I don't need a navigiationBar on the initial view. – Vapidant Aug 16 '19 at 13:33
  • 1
    Is there a way to navigate through views without navigationView? – user1445685 Nov 11 '19 at 9:38
4

This is a bug present in SwiftUI (still as of Xcode 11.2.1). I wrote a ViewModifier to fix this, based on code from the existing answers:

public struct NavigationBarHider: ViewModifier {
    @State var isHidden: Bool = false

    public func body(content: Content) -> some View {
        content
            .navigationBarTitle("")
            .navigationBarHidden(isHidden)
            .onAppear { self.isHidden = true }
    }
}

extension View {
    public func hideNavigationBar() -> some View {
        modifier(NavigationBarHider())
    }
}
|improve this answer|||||
  • With this, the "swift to back" gesture is no longer working – Urkman Jan 17 at 11:56
3

For me, I was applying the .navigationBarTitle to the NavigationView and not to List was the culprit. This works for me on Xcode 11.2.1:

struct ContentView: View {
    var body: some View {
        NavigationView {
            List {
                NavigationLink(destination: DetailView()) {
                    Text("I'm a cell")
                }
            }.navigationBarTitle("Title", displayMode: .inline)
        }
    }
}

Navigation bar and list with no gap at the top

|improve this answer|||||
  • Irrelevant to the asked question – Ahmed Sahib Feb 17 at 5:04
  • 1
    This solved my problem too, thanks for this! – G. Marc Feb 17 at 6:13
  • 1
    @AhmedSahib The question was "How to remove the default Navigation Bar space in SwiftUI NavigiationView" and my code accomplishes that. – Genki Feb 19 at 19:02
  • Excellent advice. For my solution I had to apply two modifiers to the inner list to get rid of the spacing: .navigationBarTitle("", displayMode: .automatic) .navigationBarHidden(true) Then on the outer NavigationView I had to apply: .navigationBarTitle("TITLE", displayMode: .inline) – Frankenstein Mar 3 at 2:31
3

View Modifiers made it easy:

//ViewModifiers.swift

struct HiddenNavigationBar: ViewModifier {
    func body(content: Content) -> some View {
        content
        .navigationBarTitle("", displayMode: .inline)
        .navigationBarHidden(true)
    }
}

extension View {
    func hiddenNavigationBarStyle() -> some View {
        ModifiedContent(content: self, modifier: HiddenNavigationBar())
    }
}

Example: enter image description here

import SwiftUI

struct MyView: View {
    var body: some View {
        NavigationView {
            VStack {
                Spacer()
                HStack {  
                    Spacer()
                    Text("Hello World!")
                    Spacer()
                }
                Spacer()
            }
            .padding()
            .background(Color.green)
            //remove the default Navigation Bar space:
            .hiddenNavigationBarStyle()
        }
    }
}
|improve this answer|||||
2

You could extend native View protocol like this:

extension View {
    func hideNavigationBar() -> some View {
        self
            .navigationBarTitle("", displayMode: .inline)
            .navigationBarHidden(true)
    }
}

Then just call e.g.:

ZStack {
    *YOUR CONTENT*
}
.hideNavigationBar()
|improve this answer|||||
  • This does not work (Xcode 11.3.1, iOS 13.3) – Averett Mar 13 at 4:55
1

Similar to the answer by @graycampbell but a little simpler:

struct YourView: View {

    @State private var isNavigationBarHidden = true

    var body: some View {
        NavigationView {
            VStack {
                Text("This is the master view")
                NavigationLink("Details", destination: Text("These are the details"))
            }
                .navigationBarHidden(isNavigationBarHidden)
                .navigationBarTitle("Master")
                .onAppear {
                    self.isNavigationBarHidden = true
                }
                .onDisappear {
                    self.isNavigationBarHidden = false
                }
        }
    }
}

Setting the title is necessary since it is shown next to the back button in the views you navigate to.

|improve this answer|||||
1

For me it was because I was pushing my NavigationView from an existing. In effect having one inside the other. If you are coming from a NavigationView you do not need to create one inside the next as you already inside a NavigatonView.

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0

Really loved the idea given by @Vatsal Manot To create a modifier for this.
Removing isHidden property from his answer, as I don't find it useful as modifier name itself suggests that hide navigation bar.

// Hide navigation bar.
public struct NavigationBarHider: ViewModifier {

    public func body(content: Content) -> some View {
        content
            .navigationBarTitle("")
            .navigationBarHidden(true)
    }
}

extension View {
    public func hideNavigationBar() -> some View {
        modifier(NavigationBarHider())
    }
}
|improve this answer|||||
-5

Try putting the NavigationView inside a GeometryReader.

GeometryReader {
    NavigationView {
        Text("Hello World!")
    }
}

I’ve experienced weird behavior when the NavigationView was the root view.

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