10

I'm attempting to write a Perl 6 regex for this code-golf challenge that splits a string with the rules:

  • Sequences of the same character with length 3 or less will be grouped together
  • But 4 or more will result in the first two being grouped before checking the rest

For example:

66667888    -> '66', '66, '7', '888'
19999999179 -> '1', '99', '99', '999', '1', '7', '9'

I thought the regex m:g/(.)[$0$0<!$0>|$0?]/ would work, but using a capture in the negative lookahead seems to break it, and I can't figure out how to use it properly.

Depending on how I use it, it either loops forever, throws the error Cannot resolve caller INTERPOLATE_ASSERTION, or returns the wrong result. Is there a proper way to use captures in lookaheads, or is this a bug?

  • Why does 6666 because 66 and 66 rather than 666 and 6, given that your rule states that sequences of 3 or less will be grouped together? – Tim Biegeleisen Aug 16 at 1:32
  • @TimBiegeleisen But 4 or more will result in the first two being grouped before checking the rest. So 4 in a row will be grouped as 2 and 2, not 3 and 1, while 5 will be 2 then 3. – Jo King Aug 16 at 1:33
6

According to Capturing section you need to use a code block to make these backreferences visible inside a regex:

These capture variables are only available outside the regex... In order to make them available inside the regex, you need to insert a code block behind the match; this code block may be empty if there's nothing meaningful to do

Use

given "19999999179" {
  for m:g/(.) {} :my $c = $0; ([ $c$c<!$c> | $c? ])/  -> $match {
    say ~$match;
  }
}

Results:

1
99
99
999
1
7
9

See the Perl6 demo.

In this scenario, you may contract the pattern to m:g/(.) {} [ $0$0<!$0> | $0? ]/:

my @matches;
given "19999999179" {
  for m:g/(.) {} [ $0$0<!$0> | $0? ]/ -> $match {
    @matches.push: (~$match);
  }
}
say @matches;

Results in [1 99 99 999 1 7 9].

See this Perl6 demo.

  • 1
    Ah interesting. For golfing purposes though, you can just insert the {} after the capture to force the assignment, as long as you're not doing another capture. Demo – Jo King Aug 16 at 8:41
  • 1
    FYI, for golfing and perhaps a little more speed and readability you can simplify to m:g/(.) $0? [ $0 {} <!$0> ]? /, dropping a $0 and a | alternation (a better golf), and putting the {} immediately before the construct that currently requires it (the <!$0>) for arguably better readability and perhaps a tiny speed up. – raiph Aug 17 at 4:04
  • Yes, the original pattern can be translated (for the regex "debug" purpose) into (.)(?:\1\1(?!\1)|\1?) Perl 5 regex, that really can be improved a little bit to (.)\1?(?:\1(?!\1))? (PCRE test shows 6 steps less for the string in question). So, the m:g/(.) $0? [ $0 {} <!$0> ]? / regex is OK here. – Wiktor Stribiżew Aug 19 at 7:45

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