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I am creating a project that defines the following class:

class BankAccount {
 constructor(balance=0){
   this.balance = balance;
 }

 withdraw(amount){
    if(this.balance - amount >= BankAccount.overdraftlimit){
      this.balance -= amount;
    }
  }
}

BankAccount.overdraftlimit = -500;

My question here is about the definition of the property overdraftlimit

Is this the best way to define let's call a global property? Or should be better to define it inside the constructor like

this.overdraftlimit = -500;

Thank you!!

  • 2
    that depends on your domain. can different bank account have different overdraftlimit? should a bank account be able to mutate it? – Federkun Aug 17 at 1:19
  • thanks for responding. No, another bank account cannot mutate it, and there will be different bank accounts with different overdraftlimits – Ruben Saucedo Aug 17 at 1:21
  • if the overdraftlimit is not part of any specific instance, then it make sense to be defined as part of the class itself. otherwise make that part of your instance state. – Federkun Aug 17 at 1:22
  • I personaly would set this property in the constructor with a default value and create setter and getter for it – AndTheGodsMadeLove Aug 17 at 1:24
  • ok, so I understand that if it is defined as part of the class is independant of the instance and any instance can not mutate it. – Ruben Saucedo Aug 17 at 1:25
2

If the overdraftlimit is shared across all the BankAccount, then go with the static propriety.

BankAccount.overdraftlimit = -500;

If every BankAccount have their own overdraftlimit, it should not be part of the class, but part of the single instances.

 constructor(balance = 0){
   this.balance = balance;
   this.overdraftlimit = -500;
 }

this way you could also change overdraftlimit without affecting other BankAccount.

  • ohhh, ok I got it. Declare it as a static property makes that this property can be shared by all the instances. If one change it, it will affect the other instances. As you was saying part of the class not of the instance. That is what you mean right? Great explanation – Ruben Saucedo Aug 17 at 1:55
  • yeah, that's it – Federkun Aug 17 at 1:56

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