5

I'm trying to match lines that doesn't end with either . or ! and doesn't end with either ." or !" so it should match both

  • say "bye"
  • say "bye

but shouldn't match:

  • say "bye.
  • say "bye!
  • say "bye."
  • say "bye!"

I tried using positive and negative lookahead, trying to use them as AND as suggested in Regex AND operator, but I can't make it work, nor I'm sure it's feasible with lookaheads.

6
  • what will be desired result for strings like say "bye". should it match ? Commented Aug 17, 2019 at 12:18
  • You can try something like this ^(?!.*[.!]"?$).*$ Commented Aug 17, 2019 at 12:46
  • It should match any line that doesn't end with . or ! or ." or !" so say "bye". shouldn't match. Your suggestion seems to work, I'll test it further and study it to understand what it does; thanks!
    – Mauro
    Commented Aug 17, 2019 at 12:52
  • Why do you think jEdit has no lookbehind? Of course it has, it has all that Java supports, lookbehind included.
    – Vampire
    Commented Aug 19, 2019 at 9:29
  • Because in jEdit's user guide's page about regex lookaheads are listed, but lookbehinds are not, so I thought it didn't had them: jedit.org/users-guide/regexps.html
    – Mauro
    Commented Aug 19, 2019 at 13:16

3 Answers 3

4

You can use

^(?!.*[.!]"?$).*$

enter image description here

Regex Demo

Note:- This matches empty line too as we use * which means match anything zero or more time, if you want to avoid empty lines to match you can use + quantifier which means match one or more time

1
  • This works, but is pretty inefficient. Using negative lookbehind should be preferred.
    – Vampire
    Commented Aug 19, 2019 at 14:28
1

Just use a negative lookbehind. This matches exactly what you asked for: ^.*+(?<![.!]"?)$


^ - beginning of line
.*+ - any amount of characters, not giving up for backtracking
(?<! + ) - not preceded by
[.!] - dot or exclamation mark
"? - optional double-quote
$ - end of line

7
  • And is much more efficient, the lookahead variant has to match the whole string twice. My version needs for a matching line that is x characters long always 6 steps in the regex engine, the lookahead variant needs x * 2 + 6 steps. And my (now slightly improved) version needs for a non-matching line always 5 steps in the regex engine, the lookahead variant needs 10 steps.
    – Vampire
    Commented Aug 19, 2019 at 14:06
  • What does it mean "not giving up for backtracking"?
    – Mauro
    Commented Aug 19, 2019 at 15:58
  • 1
    It is a possessive quantifier, meaning once it matched something it won't give up characters to somehow find a match that makes the regex match. Read more about it at regular-expressions.info/possessive.html. Without the + for a non-matching line the engine would first match all characters and see whether then comes the end not preceded by dot or exclamation mark and optional double-quote. As this is not the case, the non-possessive * would give up one character and the same check is done. But as this can never match, we can use the possessive quantifier there.
    – Vampire
    Commented Aug 19, 2019 at 16:13
  • @Vampire where did you tested this regex this shows pattern error to me Regex Demo Commented Aug 19, 2019 at 17:47
  • @CodeManiac we are talking about Java regexes. With what you linked you can only test PHP, JavaScript, Python and Golang regexes. Each flavor has its specifics. For PHP you could for example write ^.*+(?<![.!]|[.!]")$ to have it valid.
    – Vampire
    Commented Aug 19, 2019 at 21:23
0

Ensure bye isn't succeeded by . or ! with a positive look-ahead for a negative character class, and then make the last " optional with the ? quantifier:

\bsay "bye(?=[^.!])"?
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  • How can I make it work for any line, not just the example one? I tried ^.+(?=[^.!])"?, but it doesn't work. Edit: Code Maniac's suggestion seems to work, I'm testing it.
    – Mauro
    Commented Aug 17, 2019 at 12:48
  • I'm assuming jEdit's search-replace feature has a "Replace All" function? Commented Aug 17, 2019 at 12:52
  • Yes, it does have it.
    – Mauro
    Commented Aug 17, 2019 at 12:52
  • This version would not match a line ending on bye like the second example in the question, as it always needs one character after the bye that is not a dot or exclamation mark. Additionally the regex does not test for the end of string.
    – Vampire
    Commented Aug 19, 2019 at 14:08

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