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I am trying to write a code in C that generates random characters make of 2 letters (aa, ab, ac, ad, ae ... za, zb, zc... zz). The question is how do i store this characters into an array instead of printing them on the screen?

string key[] = {
    "A", "B", "C", "D", "E", "F", "G", "H", "I", "J", "K", "L", "M",  "N", "O", "P", "Q", "R", "S", "T", "U", "V", "X", "Y", "Z", "a","b", "c", "d", "e", "f", "g", "h", "i", "j", "k", "l", "m", "n", "o", "p","q", "r", "s", "t", "u", "v", "x", "y", "z"};
for(int i = 0; i < 50; i++)
{
        for(int j = 0; j < 50; j++)
        {
            printf("%s%s\n", key[i], key[j]);
        }
    }
3
  • 1
    just use sprintf() instead. FYI the output is not random. Commented Aug 17, 2019 at 14:52
  • @chux I don't see "is not working" anywhere in this question. Also, the OP doesn't know what sprintf is yet, evidently
    – S.S. Anne
    Commented Aug 17, 2019 at 15:30
  • 1
    @JL2210 "is not working" was is a deleted comment OP made about a suggested fix not working. I'll clean up my now less relevant comment soon. Commented Aug 17, 2019 at 19:45

4 Answers 4

1

It seems you want to have all the combinations of two characters as strings in an array. BTW: this is not random.

A solution could look like this:

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {

    string key[] = {
            "A", "B", "C", "D", "E", "F", "G", "H", "I", "J", "K", "L", "M", "N", "O", "P", "Q", "R", "S", "T", "U",
            "V", "X", "Y", "Z", "a", "b", "c", "d", "e", "f", "g", "h", "i", "j", "k", "l", "m", "n", "o", "p", "q",
            "r", "s", "t", "u", "v", "x", "y", "z"};

    //num is the number of elements in the array
    int num = sizeof(key) / sizeof(key[0]);
    //dynamically allocate memory for it
    char *combi = malloc(num * num * (sizeof(char) * 3));

    for (int i = 0; i < num; i++) {
        for (int j = 0; j < num; j++) {
            char *buf = combi + (i * num + j) * (sizeof(char) * 3);
            sprintf(buf, "%s%s", key[i], key[j]);
        }
    }

    //verify the result
    int counter = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < num; i++) {
        for (int j = 0; j < num; j++) {
            char *combination = combi + (i * num + j) * (sizeof(char) * 3);
            printf("[%d]: %s\n", counter++, combination);
        }
    }

    //free the dynamically allocated memory
    free(combi);

    return 0;
}

Output

[0]: AA
[1]: AB
[2]: AC
...
[2498]: zy
[2499]: zz

Explanation

`combi' points to a dynamically allocated block with a size of 7500 bytes. This memory block is then used to store all combinations of two characters as strings.

A string in C means that it is terminated with a NULL.

Each entry thus has 3 bytes: two bytes for the 2 characters and one byte for the terminating NULL.

The memory layout looks like this:

memory layout

Suppose you want to access the second string, that would be in our case the string "AB":

You would use the character pointer to the allocated memory called combi and add 3.

char *secondString = combi + 3;

If you now want to output this string with printf, write

printf("%s\n", secondString);

and get the output "AB". BTW: You can also call any function other than printf that would expect a string as a parameter.

When working with nested loops, we must multiply the number of elements by the value of the outer index variable and add the value of the inner index variable to obtain the corresponding array index. Since each element has three bytes (two characters and a terminating NULL), this array index must be multiplied by 3 to get the corresponding pointer to the string.

4
  • A graphic might be helpful, so I've updated the answer and added an explanation and a graphic with the resulting memory layout. Commented Aug 17, 2019 at 22:11
  • Now is much more clear. Thank you for detailed explanation
    – Criticalll
    Commented Aug 18, 2019 at 10:31
  • I see that you stored the combinations in a string called buf. What i don't understand is why did you make the second loop where you haven't called buf there. What's the point of creating that string?
    – Criticalll
    Commented Aug 18, 2019 at 12:47
  • buf is a char pointer. It's not a new string. It starts to point at the beginning of the allocated memory and increases 3 bytes with each step and writes the next string consisting of two characters and a terminating null-byte to this position. The second loop where all the values are printed to console also contains such a pointer, it's just called differently (char *combination). Commented Aug 18, 2019 at 18:48
0

I can give another code.

int i;
int j;
for(i=97;i<=122;i++){
    for(j=97;j<=122;j++){
        printf("%c %c,",i,j);
    }
}

It prints in the following format:

a a,a b and so on till z z.

1
  • 1
    This doesn't answer the question. The question is how to store the results, not how to print it. Commented Aug 17, 2019 at 16:19
0

You need a place to store the data (stored[]), which needs to contain strings (char*'s) with sufficient room for the string null-terminator. Thus, "XX" has sizeof("XX") = 3.

You omitted 'W' (and 'w').

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

string key[] = {
  "A", "B", "C", "D", "E", "F", "G", "H", "I", "J", "K", "L", "M",
  "N", "O", "P", "Q", "R", "S", "T", "U", "V", "W", "X", "Y", "Z",
  "a", "b", "c", "d", "e", "f", "g", "h", "i", "j", "k", "l", "m",
  "n", "o", "p", "q", "r", "s", "t", "u", "v", "w", "x", "y", "z"
};
//how many elements in key[] array
const int keysize = sizeof(key)/sizeof(key[0]);
//this should be largest string produced...
const int elementsize = sizeof("XX");
//fixed static allocation
char stored[keysize*keysize][elementsize];
//dynamic allocation
char* dynamic = malloc(keysize*keysize*elementsize);

int
main(int argc, char* argv)
{
  printf("keysize:%d\n",keysize);
  printf("elementsize:%d\n",elementsize);

  int ndx0, ndx1, offset;
  //combine every element of key with every element, O(N*N)
  for(ndx0=0; ndx0<keysize; ndx0++) {
    for(ndx1=0; ndx1<keysize; ndx1++) {
      //printf("[%d,%d]offset:%d\n",ndx0,ndx1,offset);
      offset = ndx0*keysize+ndx1;
      sprintf(stored[offset],"%s%s",*key[ndx0],*key[ndx1]);
      //place all the strings in one long char buffer, dynamic[]
      sprintf(dynamic[offset*elementsize],"%s%s",*key[ndx0],*key[ndx1]);
    }
  }

  //confirm
  for(ndx0=0; ndx0<keysize; ndx0++) {
    for(ndx1=0; ndx1<keysize; ndx1++) {
      offset = ndx0*keysize+ndx1;
      //printf("[%d,%d]%s,",ndx0,ndx1,stored[offset]);
      printf("%s\n", stored[offset]);
      if( (26-1)==(offset%26)) printf("\n");
    }
  }

  //confirm, dynamic allocation
  for(ndx0=0; ndx0<keysize; ndx0++) {
    for(ndx1=0; ndx1<keysize; ndx1++) {
      int offset = ndx0*keysize+ndx1;
      printf("%s,", dynamic+offset*elementsize);
      if( (26-1)==(offset%26)) printf("\n");
    }
  }
}
-1

Here is how I solved the problem:

char char_2[1000];
for(int i = 0; i < 50; i++)
    {
        for(int j = 0; j < 50; j++)
        {
            sprintf(char_2, "%s%s", key[i], key[j]);
        }
    }
1
  • This goes into the right direction, but doesn't completely solve your problem. You are writing all combinations into the first three bytes of the char_2 array. If you would print it out, you would have just "zz" as a result. Also the dimension of the array is wrong. You should have 50 x 50 * (2 chars plus 1 byte for terminating null - if you want to have strings), which would be 7500 bytes. This should rather by dynamically allocated. Commented Aug 17, 2019 at 17:21

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