1

I have a try...catch construct in my code somewhere:

try {
    // Some code.
} catch (Exception e) {
    if (condition) {
        // Break out of catch block.
    }
    // Continue catch block.
}

How can I label my catch block so that I can write break LABEL_NAME; in place of // Break out of catch block., so that execution will exit the try...catch construct entirely?

Attempts

I expected to be able to place a label before the catch keyword:

try { }
LBL: catch(Exception e) { }

as the label would go before the keyword in many other language constructs (e.g. LBL: if(... or LBL: for(...) but that raised a syntax error.

I wasn't able to place the label after the catch(Exception e) code either.

Edit

This question is purely out of curiosity for how one could accomplish this in Java. I am more than well aware that there are other ways to control flow of execution in a block of code.

If I'm ever to come across code that has labeled a catch or some similar block, and breaks from the block using the label, I'd like to know exactly what the code is doing and how it's doing it.

10
  • 7
    why not if (condition) {...} else {...} Aug 19, 2019 at 7:08
  • 6
    You should not use labels at all, ever.
    – luk2302
    Aug 19, 2019 at 7:09
  • 2
    That's not how structured programming works...
    – Sweeper
    Aug 19, 2019 at 7:10
  • 2
    How about you should very very rarely use labels Aug 19, 2019 at 7:12
  • 8
    Using nested for loops is already a bad idea. Hint. you want to read about clean code, and why you are really careful about nesting anything. And yes, using labels for catch blocks is a terrible idea. Telling you to not do that on the other hand: is great advice.
    – GhostCat
    Aug 19, 2019 at 7:13

3 Answers 3

6

To break out of a catch, the try needs to be labeled:

LABEL: try {
   // Some code.
} catch(Exception e) {
   if(condition) {
      break LABEL;
   }
   // Remaining code.
}

Again, I'm sure there are plenty of better alternatives to this code, but this answers what the question is explicitly asking.

1
  • 1
    I did not even know that this is a thing, interesting, thanks!
    – Zabuzard
    Aug 19, 2019 at 7:44
6

My position on the debate in the comments, as to whether you should use labels: my position is avoid at all costs, unless the alternative is worse.

In this case, it seems easiest just to invert the condition:

try {
    // Some code.
} catch (Exception e) {
    if (!condition) {
      // Continue catch block.
    }
}

Assuming the Continue catch block code isn't huge (which would in and of itself be undesirable), this seems better than involving labels.


Just as an alternative to Kröw's answer, whilst you can't label a catch (because it's not a statement), you can define a labelled block inside the catch (because a block is a statement):

    try {
      // Some code.
    } catch(Exception e) {
      LABEL:
      {
        if (condition) {
          break LABEL;
        }
        // Remaining code.
      }
    }

This is pretty gross, but has the advantage that the label is closer to the break (e.g. if "// Some code" were very long, it might be unclear what you're breaking out of).

However, if you're introducing the extra level of indentation here, you may as well just use it for if (!condition) instead.

3
  • 1
    Assuming the Continue catch block code isn't huge (which would in and of itself be undesirable) unless this is the crux of the matter, I do not see why labels would be necessary. Aug 19, 2019 at 7:24
  • The introduction of a new labeled block, inside the catch block, seems heavily counter productive towards any goal of clarity. Labels should be given unique names to allow developers to identify which labeled break corresponds to which labeled statement; not given "close proximity" to the statements which refer to them.
    – Kröw
    Dec 11, 2022 at 3:43
  • As per the comment debate, you may be able to avoid writing them all you desire, but when reading code written by others, you are at their expense. Therefore in addition to the points you bring up in your answer, it would be better augmented with a response to the question, given its location on the site.
    – Kröw
    Dec 11, 2022 at 3:46
0

Best way is to put you code in one function let say foo. This will always we better option then using another try-catch inside catch block.

public void foo(Boolean condition){
   try {
        // Some code.
       } catch (Exception e) {
          if (condition) {
             // Break out of catch block.
             return; 
          }
         // Continue catch block.
     }
}

If there is any code after or before try:

public void bar(){
  // your code
  foo(codition);
  // your code.
}
3
  • 5
    That is only possible if there is nothing after the try, clearly. Aug 19, 2019 at 7:25
  • @AndyTurner thats why i'm saying put this try catch in separate function and from parent function where there is code after try call this. Aug 19, 2019 at 7:26
  • @SumitSingh This is not an answer to the question. Comments and suggestions that point out tangential details or useful tips are better left as a comment to the question, rather than as an answer.
    – Kröw
    Dec 11, 2022 at 3:40

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