1

I'm writing a sketch of a simple thread-safe logging library and some things came on my mind. Here's the code:

#ifndef SimpleLogger_H
#define SimpleLogger_H
#include <iostream>
#include <mutex>
class SimpleLogger
{
public:
    template <typename T>
    static void log(T message)
    {
        mutex.lock();
        std::cout << message;
        mutex.unlock();
    }
private:
    static std::mutex mutex;
}LOG;

template <typename T>
SimpleLogger &operator<<(SimpleLogger &simpleLogger, T message)
{
    simpleLogger.log(message);
    return simpleLogger;
}
#endif //SimpleLogger_H

My idea is to use it like this:

LOG << "hello" << " world " << 8 << " I can mix integers and strings";

I understand that the line above is like the following:

auto a1 = LOG.operator<<("hello");
auto a2 = a1.operator<<(" world ");
//Another thread may want to use LOG here, and would print in the middle of my message
auto a3 = a2.operator<<(8);
auto a4 = a3.operator<<(" I can mix integers and strings");

As you can see, because << is broken into several funciton calls, there's a risk that a thread can use the LOG object in the middle of my message (I consider a message the entire cascade of << on one line)

Also, is there a way to automatically add an std::endl for the last << call? I couldn't think of a way to do this, but I saw that some logging libraries have this functionality

How do I solve these two problems?

I know it'd be preferable to use a logging library but I want to mix android, desktop and ios logging in one simple lib without need for high performance, and I'm also puzzled by how I can overcome the difficulties I encountered while writing my own

6
  • 3
    You shouldn't lock() / unlock() mutexes manually, use a std::lock_guard instead. Aug 19 '19 at 8:19
  • @πάνταῥεῖ thanks, I will (I know how they work but I intended to make the example simple) Aug 19 '19 at 8:19
  • 3
    A common way is to not have a variable LOG but rather a function LOG() that returns a temporary logger object. This temporary logger object locks the mutex in the constructor and then unlocks it in the destructor. Aug 19 '19 at 8:22
  • @Someprogrammerdude nice, and I can also do std::cout << std::endl; in the destructor before unlocking. I'd also be intersted in knowing how to do it with a global object also, if possible Aug 19 '19 at 8:34
  • You should not stream std::endl unless you really want to flush (which you usually never do). It is orders of magnitude slower than \n. Aug 19 '19 at 8:57
1

A simple solution is to write into files instead of standard output, and specifically, separate file for each thread. That way no locking or any other synchronization is needed. The files can later be merged if lines have parseable format.

Another solution is to write logs asynchronously from a single thread, and initially store the messages in a thread safe (possibly lock free) queue.

Also, is there a way to automatically add an std::endl for the last << call?

Unless I misunderstand, you can simply do stream << message << std::endl.

1

As others already mentioned, you need a local buffer to collect message before sending to the log file. In the example below, SimpleLoggerBuffer objects are designed to be used as temporary variable only. I.e. it gets destroyed at the end of the expression. The destructor flushes the buffer into the log so that you don't have to explicitly call a flush function (you may add endl there as well if you wish)

#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>
#include <mutex>

using namespace std;

class SimpleLogger
{
public:    
    template <typename T>
    static void log(T& message)
    {
        mutex.lock();
        std::cout << message.str();
        message.flush();
        mutex.unlock();
    }
private:
    static std::mutex mutex;
}LOG;
std::mutex SimpleLogger::mutex;

struct SimpleLoggerBuffer{
    stringstream ss;

     SimpleLoggerBuffer() = default;
     SimpleLoggerBuffer(const SimpleLoggerBuffer&) = delete;
     SimpleLoggerBuffer& operator=(const SimpleLoggerBuffer&) = delete;
     SimpleLoggerBuffer& operator=(SimpleLoggerBuffer&&) = delete;
     SimpleLoggerBuffer(SimpleLoggerBuffer&& buf): ss(move(buf.ss)) {
     }
     template <typename T>
     SimpleLoggerBuffer& operator<<(T&& message)
     {
          ss << std::forward<T>(message);
          return *this;
     }

    ~SimpleLoggerBuffer() {
        LOG.log(ss);
    }
};

template <typename T>
SimpleLoggerBuffer operator<<(SimpleLogger &simpleLogger, T&& message)
{
    SimpleLoggerBuffer buf;
    buf.ss << std::forward<T>(message);
    return buf;
}

int main() {
    LOG << "hello" << " world " << 8 << " I can mix integers and strings";
}
4
  • I like this idea, but having to put flush in the end is annoying :( Aug 19 '19 at 20:50
  • Ok, updated my answer without explicit flushing (in my experience, having an explict flushing is not that bad ...)
    – SPD
    Aug 20 '19 at 10:22
  • shouldn't we return SimpleLoggerBuffer& instead of SimpleLoggerBuffer in operator<<? I have the idea that this way you did, it returns a copy, not a reference, and therefore it's slow Aug 23 '19 at 5:02
  • the copy constructor of SimpleLoggerBuffer is deleted, therefore the compiler is forced to use move constructor when returning SimpleLoggerBuffer. The overhead should be minimum. We need to use SimpleLoggerBuffer outside operator<<, therefore the function has to return by value.
    – SPD
    Aug 26 '19 at 8:23
1

You could create a helper class that collects all the output and prints on destruction. Outline:

#include <string>
#include <iostream>

struct Msg;
struct Log {
    void print(const Msg &m);
};

struct Msg {
    std::string m;
    Log &l;
    Msg(Log &l) : l(l) {}
    ~Msg() {
        // Print the message on destruction
        l.print(*this);
    }
};

void Log::print(const Msg &m) {
    // Logger specific printing... here, append newline
    std::cout << m.m << std::endl;
}

Msg &&operator << (Msg &&m, const std::string &s) {
    // Append operator
    m.m += s;
    return std::move(m);
}


// Helper to log on a specific logger. Just creates the initial message
Msg log(Log &l) { return Msg(l); }

int main()
{
    Log l;
    log(l) << "a" << "b" << "c";
    return 0;
}

As the Msg is local, other threads will not interfere with it. Any necessary locking can be done in the Log.print method, which will receive the complete message

4
  • you need to take extra care in the destructor. You can't throw exceptions in a destructor.
    – bolov
    Aug 19 '19 at 9:24
  • @bolov This is just a quick outline of the idea. Also, you can throw exceptions in a destructor, you just should not. But good point, should be considered
    – king_nak
    Aug 19 '19 at 9:46
  • #define log(logger) Msg(logger) no! why? no! Do you realize this will mess up any member named log in any class in any namespace? Or any variable named log. Don't do this
    – bolov
    Aug 19 '19 at 9:50
  • With std::ostringstream instead of std::string (and making your stream operator a template), you could provide support for everything which supports stream output. Aug 19 '19 at 9:52
0

I think that you can simply use std::clog. It is thread safe and, in contrary of std::cout, designed to output instantly for logging. From the reference page :

Unless sync_with_stdio(false) has been issued, it is safe to concurrently access these objects from multiple threads for both formatted and unformatted output.

I recommend you this Jason Turner's video about cout, clog and cerror.

4
  • AFAIK, all stream output is thread safe. However, that doesn't mean that there might not be thread switches while composing a line with stream operator<<s. This is what OP tries to prevent. Aug 19 '19 at 9:29
  • What I meant is on the reference page it is formally written that Unless sync_with_stdio(false) has been issued, it is safe to concurrently access these objects from multiple threads for both formatted and unformatted output.
    – Tiphaine
    Aug 19 '19 at 9:31
  • A buffer might be emitted at line end. AFAIK it might be emitted at any other point as well (e.g. if there occurs buffer ful before line end). Aug 19 '19 at 9:34
  • Have a look at this to see what I mean: SO: C++ Locking stream operators with mutex. Aug 19 '19 at 9:36
0

The simplest approach is to return a temporary proxy from the first << - this can either log your stream for the duration (and unlock on destruction), or simply build a local ostringstream and flush it in a single call (again, on destruction).

Holding a lock while logging isn't great for performance (although it's better than your existing log method, which should use std::lock_guard for exception safety).

Building and discarding a temporary ostringstream is probably better, but if you care about performance you'll need to benchmark, and may well end up requiring something more elaborate (per-thread circular buffers, mmapped files or something).

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