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This question already has an answer here:

These codes don't work:

const a = [[1, 1], [2, 2]]
console.log(a.includes([1, 1])); // --> false
console.log(a.indexOf([1, 1])); // --> -1

This work but I think its not optimized

console.log(a.map(x => x.toString()).includes([1, 1].toString()));
// --> true

Is there a simpler way ?

marked as duplicate by Atul Sharma, adiga javascript Aug 19 at 10:28

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  • 1
    this might also help: stackoverflow.com/questions/7837456/… (if [1, 1] are the same reference in memory, then you can find your result using the first two methods) – Nick Parsons Aug 19 at 10:26
  • Array is one kind of object, both the objects are referring to a different location from the addressing point of view. Compare each element one by one. – Sufiyan Ansari Aug 19 at 10:29
  • JSON.stringify(a).includes('[1,1]') – Slai Aug 19 at 11:16
  • Thanks for all answers – Vincent Aug 19 at 11:26
  • use a.join(".").indexOf([1, 1]) for optimized solution – Gokul Raj K.N. Aug 19 at 11:27
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const a = [[1, 1], [2, 2]]
var index=a.findIndex(x=>{return JSON.stringify(x)===JSON.stringify([2, 2])})

console.log(`item index : ${index}`);

-2

Assuming this:

var arr = ['a', 'b', 'b'];

you can invoke:

Array.isArray(arr);

will return true if the considered variable is an array, otherwise not.

Once you get it, you can apply it to the external array.

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