3

I have created class Helper with path App\Http\Helpers\:

<?php

namespace App\Http\Helpers;

class Helper 
{
    public static function applyClass($user) {
        return "new";
    }

}

Then I have registered it in app.php in section aliases:

'Helper' =>   App\Http\Helpers\Helper::class

When I tried to call static method from blade:

<tr class="{{ \Helper::applyClass($user) }}">
<tr class="{{ Helper::applyClass($user) }}">

I get an error:

Class 'Helper' not found
6
  • 1
    try composer dump-autoload – dparoli Aug 19 '19 at 16:00
  • 1
    take a look at blade service injection laravel.com/docs/master/blade#service-injection – Joaquin Javi Aug 19 '19 at 16:02
  • 1
    Injection is not required when calling static methods. – Namoshek Aug 19 '19 at 16:03
  • I tried: composer dump-autoload no result – user3573738 Aug 19 '19 at 16:06
  • Sorry, took me a bit to write everything down. :) – Namoshek Aug 19 '19 at 16:21
9

This is not how facades work. A custom facade is required to extend Illuminate\Support\Facades\Facade, which basically only requires the custom facade to implement protected static function getFacadeAccessor(). This method should return the name (or a class or an interface) which is supposed to be resolved by the facade.

A facade allows you to call instance methods (i.e. non-static methods) in a static way. This works because facades know how to redirect calls to static methods to the instance behind the facade. This is done by implementing __callStatic($method, $args), which simply redirects the static method call to the implementation of which the name is returned by getFacadeAccessor().

Imagine you have a service registered under the name helper in the service container. You could then execute a method getColor() on it using app('helper')->getColor() or app()->make('helper')->getColor().

With a facade called Helper which resolves your helper by returning it as string from the getFacadeAccessor() method, you can then perform the same action using Helper::getColor().


In your case, you have a few options now:

1) Using a class with static methods:

Similarly to what you already did, you can define a class with static methods. You then call these methods statically from your blade view by using the fully qualified class name (FQCN):

// app/Helpers/Helper.php
class Helper
{
    public static function getColor(): string
    {
        return 'blue';
    }
}

// resources/views/some/page.blade.php
<div style="color:{{ \App\Helpers\Helper::getColor() }}"> ... </div>

2) Using a non-static class with a facade:

You can use a similar class as above with non-static methods and add a facade for it:

// app/Helpers/Helper.php
class Helper
{
    public function getColor(): string
    {
        return 'blue';
    }
}

// app/Facades/Helper.php
class Helper extends \Illuminate\Support\Facades\Facade
{
    public function getFacadeAccessor()
    {
        return \App\Helpers\Helper::class;
    }
}

// config/app.php -> 'aliases' array
[
    // ... other facades ...
    'Helper' => \App\Facades\Helper::class,
]

// resources/views/some/page.blade.php
<div style="color:{{ \Helper::getColor() }}"> ... </div>

3) Using a global non-class helper file:

You can also define a basic PHP file containing some helper functions, which are registered globally. These functions are not class methods and do therefore not require being called with a class prefix:

// app/Helpers/color_utils.php
if (!function_exists('get_color')) {
    function get_color()
    {
        return 'blue';
    }
}

// app/Providers/HelperServiceProvider.php
class HelperServiceProvider extends \Illuminate\Support\ServiceProvider
{
    public function register(): void
    {
        $filenames = glob(app_path('Helpers/*.php'));

        if ($filenames !== false && is_iterable($filenames)) {
            foreach ($filenames as $filename) {
                require_once $filename;
            }
        }
    }
}

// config/app.php -> 'providers' array
[
    // ... other providers ...
    \App\Providers\HelperServiceProvider::class,
]

// resources/views/some/page.blade.php
<div style="color:{{ get_color() }}"> ... </div>

4) Using a class and service injection:

Also a nice option is to inject a service into a Blade template using the service container. Laravel provides a Blade directive called @inject($var, $fqdn) for it.

// app/Helpers/Helper.php
class Helper
{
    public static function getColor(): string
    {
        return 'blue';
    }
}

// resources/views/some/page.blade.php
@inject('helper', \App\Helpers\Helper::class)

<div style="color:{{ $helper->getColor() }}"> ... </div>

I hope the code speaks for itself. Namespaces of the files are omitted on purpose, of course you should use the namespaces according to the directories (PSR-4 compliant).

If you don't need any dependencies and you basically only need static access to something, I personally prefer global helpers (option 3).

1
  • 1
    This is The Answer, good explanation, it should be accepted blindfolded. I am missing a double upvote. – dparoli Aug 19 '19 at 17:02
3

You can achieve this in a straight forward way by following these steps.

Step 1

Create your class file in your desired path (example: app/Helpers/Helper.php) and define the class

<?php

class Helper 
{
    public static function applyClass($user) {
        return "call from helper to " . $user;
    }

}

Step 2

Modify composer.json file by adding your file within the entry of the autoload key

"autoload": {
    "prs-4": {
        "App\\": "app/"
    },
    "files": [
        "app/Helpers/Helper.php"
    ]
}

Note that you are not changing anything apart from including this entry: "files": ["app/Helpers/Helper.php"]. Save the file.

Step 3

Run this command from your root directory:

composer dump-autoload

it refreshes the autoload cache.

Step 4

You can now use your class from anywhere including blade

<tr class="{{ Helper::applyClass("user") }}">

This way, you can also create global functions as well.

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