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Why does the constructor property of a class instance contain the entire body of a class, not just the constructor function?

// given: 
class C {
  constructor() {
    this.data = 'some data'
  }
  fn() {
    console.log('in fn')
  }
}
const c = new C()

c.__proto__.constructor
// returns
// class C {
//   constructor() {
//     this.data = 'some data'
//   }
//   fn() {
//     console.log('in fn')
//   }
// }

Object.getPrototypeOf(c).constructor
// returns
// class C {
//   constructor() {
//     this.data = 'some data'
//   }
//   fn() {
//     console.log('in fn')
//   }
// }

c.constructor
// returns 
// class C {
//   constructor() {
//     this.name = 'some data'
//   }
//   fn() {
//     console.log('in fn')
//   }
// }

I would think it would just return the actual constructor. As I understand, pre-ES2015, after extending a "class", a constructor would be reset to the child class's function body, eg:

function Parent() { console.log('function body parent') }
function Child() { console.log('function body child') }
Child.prototype = Object.create(Parent.prototype); 
Child.prototype.constructor = Child; // reset

However, I'm a little confused here because trying to see the constructor here just gets me [native code]

Object.getPrototypeOf(Child).constructor
ƒ Function() { [native code] }
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You are right, in both cases .constructor just refers to the constructor function.

Why does the constructor property of a class instance contain the entire body of a class, not just the constructor function?

The console tries to help you, if you tell it to log a constructor function, it will also show the methods of the prototype. (It will probably use some internal properties to determine wether the function was created with class or not and show the function differently based on that). If you call Function#toString() on constructor functions created with classyou can observe the same behaviour.

I'm a little confused here because trying to see the constructor here just gets me [native code]

Object.getPrototypeOf(Child) confuses you cause you called it on the constructor function itself and not onto an instance. And the * constructor function* inherits from Function directly, unless it is a subclass created with class, then there is some magic stuff going on that sets the prototype (not the .prototypeproperty) of the * constructor function* to the superclass constructor function (to inherit static properties).

  • Thank you. Object.getPrototypeOf(Child) confuses you cause you called it on the constructor function itself and not onto an instance. If I understand correctly then, what I have done here is call the constructor function of the Parent class as though it were a static method, eg Parent.constructor(). Is this correct? – 1252748 Aug 19 at 17:08
  • Practically speaking, is the .constructor method used beyond what I use in my "pre-ES2015" example, when setting the constructor back to that of an extended child class after having set its prototype. I believe this is the only place I have seen it used. – 1252748 Aug 19 at 17:09
  • No. With getPrototypeOf(Child) you haven't called anything except of getPrototypeOf. – Jonas Wilms Aug 19 at 17:11
  • The .constructorproperty can be used on/in instances to refer back to the function it was constructed from, otherwise there won't be any way to get back to the constructor from an instance – Jonas Wilms Aug 19 at 17:13
  • Ah, that first comment should actually have been Object.getPrototypeOf(Child).constructor, sorry was quoting, and forgot to add a step to explain the actual question – 1252748 Aug 19 at 17:15

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