-3

I'm using this method to connect to my MySQL db to SELECT, INSERT, UPDATE and DELETE data. This is the cnn() function:

function cnn() {
    static $pdo;
    if(!isset($pdo)) {
        $settings = [
            PDO::ATTR_TIMEOUT => 30,
            PDO::ATTR_PERSISTENT => false,
            PDO::ATTR_ERRMODE => PDO::ERRMODE_EXCEPTION,
            PDO::ATTR_DEFAULT_FETCH_MODE => PDO::FETCH_ASSOC
        ];
        try {
            # settings
            $config['db']['host'] = 'example.com';
            $config['db']['name'] = 'db';
            $config['db']['user'] = 'username';
            $config['db']['pass'] = '****************';
            $pdo = new PDO('mysql:host='.$config['db']['host'].';dbname='.$config['db']['name'], $config['db']['user'], $config['db']['pass'], $settings);
            return $pdo;
        } catch(PDOException $e) {
            http_response_code(503);
            echo $e->getCode().': '.$e->getMessage();
        }
    } else {
        return $pdo;
    }
}

And then i can just do this to re-use the same pdo object each time i need it on the same request.

1st query

$sql = 'INSERT INTO user (name, lastname) VALUES (:name, :lastname)';
$stmt = cnn()->prepare($sql);
$stmt->bindValue(':name', "John", PDO::PARAM_STR);
$stmt->bindValue(':name', "Wayne", PDO::PARAM_STR);
$stmt->execute();

2nd query

$sql = 'SELECT * FROM user WHERE id_user = :id_user';
$stmt = cnn()->prepare($sql);
$stmt->bindValue(':id_user', 4641, PDO::PARAM_INT);
$stmt->execute();
$user = $stmt->fetch();

I was wondering if there could be any performance issues by using this approach. Thanks.

5
  • That looks fine, since the connection will run only once. But I'm not sure why you are using 2d array for the "config" since it's a local variable
    – HTMHell
    Aug 19, 2019 at 17:07
  • 1
    "That looks fine" @HTMHell no it's not fine notice static $pdo....Code after should be if(!isset(self::$pdo)) { , self::$pdo = new PDO('mysql:host='.) , return self::$pdo; Or with the Classname before ::.. Aug 19, 2019 at 17:14
  • 3
    this question rather belongs to codereview.stackexchange.com Aug 19, 2019 at 17:14
  • @RaymondNijland That's clearly a function outside a class, as you can see on his examples. You can take a look at the answers of this question to understand the different uses of static.
    – HTMHell
    Aug 20, 2019 at 8:39
  • @HTMHell thanks for the explainment which i don't really need as i know how static or OOP programming in PHP works trust me on that, mine comment about static keyword was meant as general comment... "That's clearly a function outside a class, as you can see on his examples" True i agree i should have said in the comment when using classes you also can use Classname instead of self before :: Aug 20, 2019 at 14:22

1 Answer 1

-1

1)

As referenced by HTMHell, your $config array is local here and I believe this should be deleted after use so password variables are not leakable on a later get_defined_vars() call, or similar cross reference.

2)

It seems far more logical to me to put your function in a class. Run the cnn() function from the __construct. There are a lot of positive aspects to wrapping this function in a full class.

3)

Do NOT set any variable to being static unless you have a specific requirement in the context of putting your cnn() function into a Class.

4)

Correctly use your try{ ... } catch { ... } blocks, do not wrap other code in the try block except code that throws exceptions.

    // settings
    $config['db']['host'] = 'example.com';
    $config['db']['name'] = 'db';
    $config['db']['user'] = 'username';
    $config['db']['pass'] = '****************';
    try {
        $pdo = new PDO('mysql:host='.$config['db']['host'].';dbname='.$config['db']['name'], $config['db']['user'], $config['db']['pass'], $settings);
    } catch(PDOException $e) {
        /***
         * Do you really need this, here?  
         * //http_response_code(503);
         **/
        echo $e->getCode().': '.$e->getMessage();
    }
    return $pdo;

5)

DO NOT EVER OUTPUT ERRORS DIRECTLY TO THE SCREEN

Errors should be logged so only server folks and developers rather than the general public can see them. This also means you have a log of errors rather than a single, temporary instance of any that occur.

echo $e->getCode().': '.$e->getMessage(); Should be:

error_log($e->getCode().': '.$e->getMessage());

Or similar. Stay consistent; always return a PDO object and not echo outputs.

6)

Remove your final else wrapper it is merely clutter.

if(!isset($pdo)) {
     ...
} 
return $pdo; 

Also remove the return $pdo; inside your try { ... } block. Don't Repeat Yourself.

7)

Properly document your code:

/***
 * For generating or asserting a PDO Database Object.
 * @return Returns the PDO object 
 ***/
 function cnn() {

To answer the question you actually asked:

I was wondering if there could be any performance issues by using this approach.

This question is far too broad and can be solved by yourself using timer testings or other methods (detailed in the link) to establish on your system if it is particularly efficient or inefficient, or what SQL you choose to give it...

25
  • self::$pdo is outright wrong in a function. During development it's fairly convenient to have errors onscreen. think of it. global static wrappers are frowned upon and for a reason Aug 19, 2019 at 17:45
  • @YourCommonSense I think that during development ever putting errors on screen is hughly unwise, it sets a bad precendent and means the errors reported are always temporary, and risking being transferred to a live site.
    – Martin
    Aug 19, 2019 at 17:53
  • 1
    I think letting each petty function to decide where to direct its error messages is most highly unwise. there is nothing wrong with debug mode as long as it turned on and off by a single configuration option. Aug 19, 2019 at 18:02
  • 1
    telling the op to leave their exceptions alone is nowhere "far beyond" any depth you are willing to write. Zero error logs and zero echos what is actually better Aug 19, 2019 at 18:06
  • 1
    In regards to error reporting, either re-throw the exception or just get rid of try-catch altogether. It serves no real purpose here.
    – Dharman
    Aug 19, 2019 at 18:32

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