4

This question already has an answer here:

I have an array like this:

let x = [[1, 2], [3, 4], [1, 2], [2, 1]];

What should I do to retrieve an array without the duplicates?

[[1, 2], [3, 4], [2, 1]];

I would like to use the filter method. I tried this but it doesn't work:

x.filter((value,index,self) => (self.indexOf(value) === index))

EDIT: as I specified to use the filter method, I don't think this question is a duplicate. Also, I got several interesting answers.

marked as duplicate by Gimby, ruohola, Nicolai Fröhlich Aug 20 at 13:59

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

10

Try converting the inner arrays to a string, then filter the dupes and parse the string again.

let x = [[1, 2], [3, 4], [1, 2]];

var unique = x.map(ar=>JSON.stringify(ar))
  .filter((itm, idx, arr) => arr.indexOf(itm) === idx)
  .map(str=>JSON.parse(str));

console.log(unique);

  • 2
    Much simpler: Array.from(new Set(arr.map(x=>JSON.stringify(x))), x=>JSON.parse(x)) – Bergi Aug 20 at 4:04
2

Okay, the string hash idea is brilliant. Props to I wrestled a bear once. I think the code itself could be a bit better though, so here's how I tend to do this type of thing:

let x = [[1, 2], [3, 4], [1, 2]];
const map = new Map();
x.forEach((item) => map.set(item.join(), item));
console.log(Array.from(map.values()));

And if you want an ugly one liner:

let x = [[1, 2], [3, 4], [1, 2]];
const noRepeats = Array.from((new Map(x.map((item) => [item.join(), item]))).values());
console.log(noRepeats);

2

This is a solution with time complexity of O(n) where n is the number of elements in your array.

Using the filter method as the OP wants it:

    const x = [[1, 2], [3, 4], [1, 2], [2, 1]];
    const s = new Set();


    const res = x.filter(el => {
      if(!s.has(el.join(""))) {
        s.add(el.join(""));
        return true;
      }
      return false
    })

    console.log(res)

My personal preference here is to use ForEach as it looks more readable.

const x = [[1, 2], [3, 4], [1, 2], [2, 1]];
const s = new Set();
const res = [];

x.forEach(el => {
  if(!s.has(el.join(""))) {
    s.add(el.join(""));
    res.push(el)
  }
})

console.log(res);

We are using a Set and a simple combination of the elements of the array to make sure they are unique. Otherwise this would become O(n^2).

  • 1
    @DominikMatis Added a solution with filter. – Alireza Aug 19 at 19:31
  • what is the inner array is more than two elements? – I wrestled a bear once. Aug 19 at 19:35
  • if it's dynamic, we have to add another level of loop but this is still faster than a nested loop that works on the whole array twice. This would become O(n*m) where n === arr.length and m===arr[0].length, assuming that they are of the same length. – Alireza Aug 19 at 19:38
  • 1
    it doesn't require another loop. consider changing el[0]+""+el[1] to el.join("") see array.join. – I wrestled a bear once. Aug 19 at 19:40
  • 1
    .join("") doesn't work. Try x = [[12,0], [1,20]]. – Bergi Aug 20 at 4:05
1

The equivalent to

x.filter((value,index,self) => (self.indexOf(value) === index))

would be

x.filter((v,i,self) => {
for1:
  for (let j = 0; j < self.length; j++) {
    if (i == j) {
      return true;
    }
    if (self[j].length != v.length) {
      continue;
    }
    for (let k = 0; k < v.length; k++) {
      if (self[j][k] != v[k]) {
        continue for1;
      }
    }
    return false;
  }
  return true;
})

Unlike some of the other answers, this does not require a conversion to string and can thus work with more complex values. Use === instead of == if you want.

The time complexity is not great, of course.

  • solid answer, +1, but it doesn't work if the array contains objects whereas the json approaches do. also, self is reserved in javascript, ideally that should have a different name. – I wrestled a bear once. Aug 19 at 19:52
  • So you are saying it is not equivalent, because your version actually works? – Bergi Aug 20 at 4:07
  • 1
    @Iwrestledabearonce. self is totally fine as a local variable name. – Bergi Aug 20 at 4:08
  • Why use these overcomplicated loops instead of simply exchanging self.indexOf(value) for self.findIndex(x => x[0]==value[0] && x[1]==value[1]) (or even using every inside there if you want to support arbitrary-length arrays)? – Bergi Aug 20 at 4:09
  • @Bergi Good question! I guess I forgot or didn't know of that function. :) – Andrea Aug 20 at 7:57
1

Filter just causes things to get into O(n^2).

The currently accepted answer uses .filter((itm, idx, arr) => arr.indexOf(itm) === idx) which will cause the array to be iterated each time during each iteration... n^2.

Why even go there? Not only that, you need to parse in the end. It is a lot of excess.

There is no real good way to filter without hitting O(n^2) here.

Instead, just use reduce. It is very straightforward and fast easily accomplishing O(n).

"Bin reduce the set to unique values."

let x = [[1, 2], [3, 4], [1, 2], [2, 1]];
let y = Object.values(x.reduce((p,c) => (p[JSON.stringify(c)] = c,p),{}));
console.log(y);

If you were to have to go the route of filter, then n^2 must be used. You can iterate each item looking for existence using every.

"Keep every element which does not have a previous duplicate."

let x = [
  [1, 2],
  [3, 4],
  [1, 2],
  [2, 1]
];
let y = x.filter((lx, li) =>
  x.every((rx, ri) =>
    rx == lx ||
    (JSON.stringify(lx) != JSON.stringify(rx) || li < ri))
);
console.log(y);

0

indexOf does not work on identical instances of arrays/objects type elements within an array, as such arrays just hold references.

In filter function instance you get via parameter v (in below code) is not the same instance as stored in array, making indexOf unable to return the index of it.

In below code, by converting objects to strings we can use indexOf to find duplicates.

let x = [[1, 2], [3, 4], [1, 2], [2, 1]];

console.log(x.
  map(function(v){
    return JSON.stringify(v)
  })
  .filter(function(v, i, o) {
    return o.length == i ? true : o.slice(i + 1).indexOf(v) == -1;
  })
  .map(function(v) {
    return JSON.parse(v)
  })
);

  • indexof works perfectly fine on arrays. jsbin.com/qerubadoqo/edit?js,console – I wrestled a bear once. Aug 19 at 19:29
  • not if its an array of arrays, you cant find index of an array within an array using indexOf – Akash Shrivastava Aug 19 at 19:30
  • if you took 15 seconds to click on the link i gave you would see that that statement is 100% incorrect. indexof works perfectly fine with arrays. – I wrestled a bear once. Aug 19 at 19:31
  • you passed a reference in indexOf, not an array, try replacing 'a' with [2, 3] and see if it works – Akash Shrivastava Aug 19 at 19:33
  • 1
    i removed my vote but your explanation is still not accurate. indexOf does "work" on arrays, but it doens't search for identical arrays, it's searches for the exact instance of the array you tell it to search for. you're on the right track using the word "reference" though. – I wrestled a bear once. Aug 19 at 19:48

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