4

so here's my code as you can see you have an object named 'Obj' then you have a class named 'myClass' which creates objects which are as identical as the 'Obj' Object but the run method in the object 'newObj' created from the myClass outputs different results which makes no sense because both objects are 100% the same

    var x = 10; //global var
    var Obj =  {
        x:30 ,
        run : () => {
          console.log(this.x);
      }
    }
    console.log(Obj)
    Obj.run() //outputs 10

    //a class which creates the same 'Obj' Object
    class myClass {
      constructor() {
        this.x=30
        this.run = () => {
          console.log(this.x)
        }
      }
    }
    var newObj = new myClass()
    console.log(newObj); //outputs an object which is as identical as the 'Obj' Object
    newObj.run(); //outputs 30 instead of 10

that's it thanks in advance

  • 3
    Obj is just an object literal, not an instance, and when you declare it the this keyword refers to the global context (e.g. windwow). That class code you're showing doesn't create the same object in the slightest. – Mike 'Pomax' Kamermans Aug 19 at 21:15
  • 1
    this in Obj is window. Replace this.x with Obj.x if you want the property of Obj. – connexo Aug 19 at 21:15
  • hey , but the console shows they are identical – AmirWG Aug 19 at 21:21
  • also both objects exist in the same scope (the global scope) – AmirWG Aug 19 at 21:24
  • 1
    this in javascript is confusing, but here using new (on a class or on a function (yes you can do that)) creates an object scope (which is accessed by this). In the object literal you never call a function so a new scope is never created so you don't get a new this scope. Had you used function key word instead of an arrow you would have gotten another scope that would be tied to the caller (even more confusing that what you have) But it's an arrow function, the scope is tied to the creation scope of window. this refers to the owning scope, not owning object. and scope can change. – DiamondDrake Aug 19 at 21:44
3

Since you are using an arrow function inside an object, this becomes window, not the Obj. But in the class, the run function is inside the constructor function, making this the object, instead of the window. If you want the object to print the objects x, then you need to use Obj.x.

var Obj =  {
    x:30 ,
    run : () => {
      console.log(Obj.x);
  }
}

Even if both the objects are in the same scope, they aren't created in the same scope, and they aren't created in the same way. Classes are constructors, objects are not.

If you really do want to use the this keyword, then instead of run : () =>, you can simply replace it with run (). Then you can use this.x instead of Obj.x. Its kind of like defining a function in a class (outside its constructor).

var Obj =  {
    x:30 ,
    run () {
      console.log(this.x);
  }
}
  • so arrow functions do not have any effect when used as methods in classes ? – AmirWG Aug 19 at 21:37
  • what i mean by this is that i have used arrow functions in myClass too so "this" should refer to window object aswell ? – AmirWG Aug 19 at 21:40
  • arrow functions can't make constructors. Its this keyword is its parent function's this. Which in case of the constructor is the constructor, which is the parent function of the arrow function. – Craftingexpert1 Aug 19 at 21:41
  • 1
    the scope of a function depends on how they are called, as well as how they are created. Arrow functions are immune to that (they are not just a short hand, they change functionality). Arrow functions tend to behave how you are used to them behaving in other languages. (this refers to the scope that created the function, not the scope that called the function.) – DiamondDrake Aug 19 at 21:50
  • 1
    since classes are always instantiated with the new keyword, you can expect an arrow function inside it to always have this refer to the instance of the class. But that is a consequence of how classes are constructed in javascript. It's not exactly a language feature. – DiamondDrake Aug 19 at 21:53
0

Assuming this is in a browser, when you say var x = 10; // global var the global object is the browser's window, so you are saying window.x = 10;

You then create your "Obj" and assign its x, x:30, but you're still in the global context, so in there when "run" runs, this is still referring to window and window.x is 10.

When you have myClass and construct one of them to be newObj, at that point this now refers to the constructed object, so this.x refers to the classes member x, which is 30.

They may look the same when viewed in the console, but that's because the console is working in the same scope both times. Try putting a breakpoint on each of the lines where you do console.log and inspect the value of this and of this.x when you've hit the breakpoint.

0

Just change the run fuction to

run() {
  console.log(this.x);
}

var x = 10; //global var

var Obj =  {
    x:30 ,
    run() {
      console.log(this.x);
    }
}

console.log(Obj)
Obj.run() //outputs 10

//a class which creates the same 'Obj' Object
class myClass {
  constructor() {
    this.x = 30
    this.run = () => {
      console.log(this.x)
    }
  }
}
var newObj = new myClass()
console.log(newObj); //outputs an object which is as identical as the 'Obj' Object
newObj.run(); //outputs 30 instead of 10

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