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I would like to parse a two-byte value that is "expressed in a signed 8.8 fixed-point notation". Let's assume that I have the two bytes in the hexadecimal format below.

let data = '1800';

The 0x1800 in hexadecimal 8.8 fixed point notation should be 24 when converted.

Another example: 0x8000 in hexadecimal signed 8.8 fixed point notation should be -128 when converted.

More details

I'm specifically attempting to parse the temperature from an Eddystone Telemetry frame, which is defined here: https://github.com/google/eddystone/blob/master/eddystone-tlm/tlm-plain.md#field-notes

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    Have you checked out the documentation for the parseInt() function? – Pointy Aug 20 at 0:17
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    Also 0x18 is 24, not 27. – Pointy Aug 20 at 0:19
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    Did you mean to tag javascript? Vanilla JS doesn't have types identifiers like that. If you're using a different language it'd probably be the equivalent of: parseInt(data, 16) / 256 – Khauri Aug 20 at 0:34
  • @Khauri I did. Thanks for pointing that out, updated. – claytonkucera Aug 20 at 1:20
  • Hi @Khauri This looks mostly right with one exception. Since it's signed 8.8 fixed point notation, it needs to handle potentially negative numbers. Specifically the value can range between 128 and -128. – claytonkucera Aug 20 at 2:18
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You can create a prototype from a custom object. Like this:

function FixedPoint(fraction){
  this.fraction = fraction;
}

FixedPoint.prototype.calculate = function(value){
  let intValue = parseInt(value, 16);
  let signed = (intValue & 0x8000) > 0 ? -1 : 1;
  return signed * intValue / Math.pow(2, this.fraction);
}

How to use it?

let example = new FixedPoint(8);
example.calculate('1840');

returns 24.25

More info about fixed point here

  • This works for most cases. Since I want to handle signed 8.8 fixed point notation, how might I update the calculate function to handle, for example, '8000' evaluating to -128? I'll update the question with this example for clarity. – claytonkucera Aug 20 at 2:22
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    @claytonkucera Can you link to more documentation of this format? How is the fractional part handled when the number is negative? – Bergi Aug 20 at 2:28
  • Hi @Bergi, I'm working off of the Eddystone Telemetry Spec provided here: github.com/google/eddystone/blob/master/eddystone-tlm/… . The spec does not clarify how the fractional part is meant to be handled when the number is negative. – claytonkucera Aug 20 at 2:32
  • Sure @claytonkucera. I updated the answer to solve hex signed numbers. – Gustavo Toro Aug 20 at 2:40
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    @claytonkucera It probably refers to people.ece.cornell.edu/land/courses/ece4760/PIC32/…. And really means that it's just a signed 16 bit integer, in units of 1/256. – Bergi Aug 20 at 2:51
2

You can shift the value left so that its sign bit lines up with JavaScript’s 32-bit signed integers:

let data = 0x8000;  // = parseInt('8000', 16);
data << 16          // -2147483648

Then divide that so the high byte represents 0–255:

(data << 16) / (1 << 24)  // -128

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