8

I have a method like below in my Spring boot app.

public Flux<Data> search(SearchRequest request) {
  Flux<Data> result = searchService.search(request);//this returns Flux<Data>
  Mono<List<Data>> listOfData = result.collectList();
//  doThisAsync() // here I want to pass this list and run some processing on it
// the processing should happen async and the search method should return immediately.
  return result;
}

//this method uses the complete List<Data> returned by above method
public void doThisAsync(List<Data> data) {
  //do some processing here
}

Currently, I'm using @Async annotated service class with doThisAsync, but don't know how to pass the List<Data>, because I don't want to call block. All I have is Mono<List<Data>>.

My main problem is how to process this Mono separately and the search method should return the Flux<Data>.

20

1, If your fire-and-forget is already async returning Mono/Flux

public Flux<Data> search(SearchRequest request)
{
    return searchService.search(request)
                        .collectList()
                        .doOnNext(data -> doThisAsync(data).subscribe())  // add error logging here or inside doThisAsync
                        .flatMapMany(Flux::fromIterable);
}

public Mono<Void> doThisAsync(List<Data> data) {
    //do some async/non-blocking processing here like calling WebClient
}

2, If your fire-and-forget does blocking I/O

public Flux<Data> search(SearchRequest request)
{
    return searchService.search(request)
                        .collectList()
                        .doOnNext(data -> Mono.fromRunnable(() -> doThisAsync(data))
                                              .subscribeOn(Schedulers.elastic())  // delegate to proper thread to not block main flow
                                              .subscribe())  // add error logging here or inside doThisAsync
                        .flatMapMany(Flux::fromIterable);
}

public void doThisAsync(List<Data> data) {
    //do some blocking I/O on calling thread
}

Note that in both of the above cases you lose backpressure support. If the doAsyncThis slows down for some reason, then the data producer won't care and keep producing items. This is a natural consequence of the fire-and-foget mechanism.

12
  • In approach 2, will the search method not wait until .doOnNext is executed completely? Aug 20 '19 at 9:07
  • No, it won't if it is really async. Aug 20 '19 at 9:27
  • sorry, I think I explained it wrong. The doThisAsync() is a normal method that runs some long db queries and some reporting services. All these are heavy call and blocking in nature. So, I want it to run separately and the search method should return its response. Aug 20 '19 at 9:42
  • But isn't it annotated with @Async as you described? If it is then you are fine with the above solution. Of course, you need to test it to make sure it works as expected. Aug 20 '19 at 9:48
  • 1
    I see, I've added a third option to the answer. Please, check it. It moves the blocking code to a separate thread pool. Aug 20 '19 at 9:55
3

Have you considered running the processing in separate threads using publishOn like in the example below? This may not be exactly what you are asking for but allows you to continue with other matters while the processing of the results in the flux is done by one or more threads, four in my example, from a dedicated scheduler (theFourThreadScheduler).

    @Test
    public void processingInSeparateThreadTest() {
        final Scheduler theFourThreadScheduler = Schedulers.newParallel("FourThreads", 4);
        final Flux<String> theResultFlux = Flux.just("one", "two", "three", "four", "five", "six", "seven", "eight");

        theResultFlux.log()
            .collectList()
            .publishOn(theFourThreadScheduler)
            .subscribe(theStringList -> {
                doThisAsync(theStringList);
            });

        System.out.println("Subscribed to the result flux");

        for (int i = 0; i < 20; i++) {
            System.out.println("Waiting for completion: " + i);
            try {
                Thread.sleep(300);
            } catch (final InterruptedException theException) {
            }
        }
    }

    private void doThisAsync(final List<String> inStringList) {
        for (final String theString : inStringList) {
            System.out.println("Processing in doThisAsync: " + theString);
            try {
                Thread.sleep(500);
            } catch (final InterruptedException theException) {
            }
        }
    }

Running the example produce the following output, showing that the processing performed in doThisAsync() is performed in the background.

Subscribed to the result flux
Waiting for completion: 0
Processing in doThisAsync: one
Waiting for completion: 1
Processing in doThisAsync: two
Waiting for completion: 2
Waiting for completion: 3
Processing in doThisAsync: three
Waiting for completion: 4
Waiting for completion: 5
Processing in doThisAsync: four
Waiting for completion: 6
Processing in doThisAsync: five
Waiting for completion: 7
Waiting for completion: 8
Processing in doThisAsync: six
Waiting for completion: 9
Processing in doThisAsync: seven
Waiting for completion: 10
Waiting for completion: 11
Processing in doThisAsync: eight
Waiting for completion: 12
Waiting for completion: 13
Waiting for completion: 14
Waiting for completion: 15
Waiting for completion: 16
Waiting for completion: 17
Waiting for completion: 18
Waiting for completion: 19

References: Reactor 3 Reference: Schedulers

3
  • the doThisAsync() method needs whole data, and then do the processing on it separately. Aug 20 '19 at 9:10
  • I've updated my example so that the doThisAsync() method now receives all the data in a list. Aug 20 '19 at 9:52
  • It's not exactly what I was looking for, but it is close. Thanks a lot. :) Aug 20 '19 at 10:24

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