120
var i;
for(i=10; i>=0; i= i-1){
   var s;
   for(s=0; s<i; s = s+1){
    document.write("*");
   }
   //i want this to print a new line
   /document.write(?);

}

I am printing a pyramid of stars, I can't get the new line to print.

  • 5
    document.write("<br>"); // if using a .html – jasonleonhard Dec 30 '14 at 16:39
  • Related thread here. – RBT Sep 29 '17 at 2:00

17 Answers 17

190
0

Use the \n for a newline character.

document.write("\n");

You can also have more than one:

document.write("\n\n\n"); // 3 new lines!  My oh my!

However, if this is rendering to HTML, you will want to use the HTML tag for a newline:

document.write("<br>");

The string Hello\n\nTest in your source will look like this:

Hello!

Test

The string Hello<br><br>Test will look like this in HTML source:

Hello<br><br>Test

The HTML one will render as line breaks for the person viewing the page, the \n just drops the text to the next line in the source (if it's on an HTML page).

| improve this answer | |
  • 5
    By definition, if the OP is using document.write, it's an HTML page, not an XHTML page. <br> is the correct linebreak for an HTML page. <br /> is XHTML. – T.J. Crowder Apr 22 '11 at 17:38
  • 1
    <br> amazing Thanks a lot – Jeya Suriya Muthumari Jan 25 '18 at 12:10
30
0

how about:

document.write ("<br>");

(assuming you are in an html page, since a line feed alone will only show as a space)

| improve this answer | |
9
0

Use a <br> tag to create a line break in the document

document.write("<br>");

Here's a sample fiddle

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    +1 as this seems to be what the OP is really looking for :) (br vs \n) – Demian Brecht Apr 22 '11 at 17:34
  • How do you know? Good to point out BR, but a PRE could have just as easily been in there too. If they are building ASCII art, my thought is it's plaintext. – Jared Farrish Apr 22 '11 at 17:37
  • @Jared: How do you call document.write in a plain text document? (E.g., how do you put in the script tag?) Good point about the pre, though, could easily be a pre section. – T.J. Crowder Apr 22 '11 at 17:40
  • @T.J. - The display is plaintext, as in ASCII art. It's still an HTML document, although, it's just showing it as plaintext display. – Jared Farrish Apr 22 '11 at 17:42
  • @Jared: Yeah, I took your point. (I thought your other bit was about a text/plain doc, but I think I was clear about the pre being a good point.) – T.J. Crowder Apr 22 '11 at 17:45
4
0

Use "\n":

document.write("\n");

Note, it has to be surrounded in double quotes for it to be interpreted as a newline. No it doesn't.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Outputting a newline in an HTML page won't introduce a new line in an HTML document. (And it doesn't have to be double quotes, single quotes are fine as well.) – T.J. Crowder Apr 22 '11 at 17:36
  • @T.J. - Unless there's a PRE involved? – Jared Farrish Apr 22 '11 at 17:40
  • Ooh, except for your point commenting on another answer about a pre element. Good point. If outputting ASCII art to a pre section, \n may well be the right thing... (Edit: LOL, overlapping comments.) – T.J. Crowder Apr 22 '11 at 17:42
  • @T.J. Crowder - Here's an example of what I meant (crudely developed): jsfiddle.net/wT3Ab – Jared Farrish Apr 22 '11 at 18:07
  • @Jared: Oh, your comment about pre was perfectly clear. (Closed the tag for you: jsfiddle.net/wT3Ab/1) Best, – T.J. Crowder Apr 22 '11 at 18:09
3
0

document.writeln() is what you are looking for or document.write('\n' + 'words') if you are looking for more granularity in when the new line is used

| improve this answer | |
2
0

Alternatively, write to an element with the CSS white-space: pre and use \n for newline character.

| improve this answer | |
2
0

To create a new line, symbol is '\n'

var i;
for(i=10; i>=0; i= i-1){
   var s;
   for(s=0; s<i; s = s+1){
    document.write("*");
   }
   //i want this to print a new line
   document.write('\n');

}

If you are outputting to the page, you'll want to use "<br/>" instead of '/n';

Escape characters in JavaScript

| improve this answer | |
  • It doesn't have to be in double quotes? – Jared Farrish Apr 22 '11 at 17:32
  • 5
    No double and singe quotes are the same in JavaScript. You just can't start with a double quote and end with a single one. – kemiller2002 Apr 22 '11 at 17:32
  • Well, I know that. Just didn't know single and doubles were treated the same in JS. Must be stuck in PHP. – Jared Farrish Apr 22 '11 at 17:33
  • Moving between language is always a pain :) – kemiller2002 Apr 22 '11 at 17:34
  • Good to know, thanks. Learn something new every day. :) Harmless error, probably. – Jared Farrish Apr 22 '11 at 17:35
2
0

In html page:

document.write("<br>"); 

but if you are in JavaScript file, then this will work as new line:

document.write("\n");
| improve this answer | |
1
0

For a string I just write "\n" to give me a new line. For example, typing console.log("First Name: Rex" + "\n" + "Last Name: Blythe"); Will type:

First Name: Rex

Last Name: Blythe

| improve this answer | |
1
0

you can also pyramid of stars like this

for (var i = 5; i >= 1; i--) {
     var py = "";
     for (var j = i; j >= 1; j--) {
         py += j;

     }
     console.log(py);
 }
| improve this answer | |
0
0

\n --> newline character is not working for inserting a new line.

    str="Hello!!";
    document.write(str);
    document.write("\n");
    document.write(str);

But if we use below code then it works fine and it gives new line.

    document.write(str);
    document.write("<br>");
    document.write(str);

Note:: I tried in Visual Studio Code.

| improve this answer | |
  • This assumes that the text will be displayed as HTML. Not sufe if that is really a generic answer here. – GhostCat Sep 16 '17 at 8:14
0
0

your solution is

var i;
for(i=10; i>=0; i= i-1){
   var s;
   for(s=0; s<i; s = s+1){
    document.write("*");
   }
   //printing new line
   document.write("<br>");
}
| improve this answer | |
-1
0

\n dosen't work. Use html tags

document.write("<br>");
document.write("?");
| improve this answer | |
-1
0

If you are using a JavaScript file (.js) then use document.write("\n");. If you are in a html file (.html or . htm) then use document.write("<br/>");.

| improve this answer | |
-1
0
document.write("\n");

won't work if you're executing it (document.write();) multiple times.

I'll suggest you should go for:

document.write("<br>");

P.S I know people have stated this answer above but didn't find the difference anywhere so :)

| improve this answer | |
-1
0

Try to write your code between the HTML pre tag.

| improve this answer | |
  • kindly add code too. it would be better to understand – Shashin Bhayani Apr 4 '19 at 11:07
-1
0

You can use below link: New line in javascript

  var i;
for(i=10; i>=0; i= i-1){
   var s;
   for(s=0; s<i; s = s+1){
    document.write("*");
   }
   //i want this to print a new line
   /document.write('<br>');

}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Your link is broken, and your code example says nothing that the accepted answer from 2011 doesn't already say. – Quentin May 16 '19 at 7:02
  • Well, the link is fixed, but it points to an explanation-free demo and you still aren't saying anything now already said in 2011. – Quentin May 17 '19 at 13:25

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