18

I have a php system that that allow customer to buy things (make an order) from our system using e-wallet (store credit).

here's the database example

**sales_order**
+--------+-------+----------+--------+--------------+-----------+
|order_id| price |product_id| status |already_refund|customer_id|
+--------+-------+----------+--------+--------------+-----------+
|   1    | 1000  |    1     |canceled|      1       |     2     |
|   2    | 2000  |    2     |pending |      0       |     2     |
|   3    | 3000  |    3     |complete|      0       |     1     | 
+--------+-------+----------+--------+--------------+-----------+

**ewallet**
+-----------+-------+
|customer_id|balance|
+-----------+-------+
|     1     | 43200 |
|     2     | 22500 |
|     3     | 78400 |
+-----------+-------+

table sales_order contain the order that customer made, the column already_refund is for a flag that canceled order already refunded.

I'm running a cron every 5 minutes to check if order with status pending can be canceled and after that it can refund the money to the customer ewallet

function checkPendingOrders(){
   $orders = $this->orderCollection->filter(['status'=>'pending']);
   foreach($orders as $order){
     //check if order is ready to be canceled
     $isCanceled = $this->isCanceled($order->getId());
     if($isCanceled === false) continue;
     if($order->getAlreadyRefund() == '0'){ // check if already refund
       $order->setAlredyRefund('1')->save();
       $this->refund($order->getId()); //refund the money to customer ewallet
     }
     $order->setStatus('canceled')->save();
   }
}

The problem the 2 different cron schedule can process the same data at the same time using this function and it will make the refund process can be called twice , so the customer will receive double refund amount. How can i handle this kind of problem, when a 2 same function running at the same time to process same data ? the if clause that i made can't handle this kind of issue

update

i've tried to use microtime in session as validation and lock the table row in MySQL, so at the beginning i set the variable to contain the microtime , than when i stored in a unique session generated by order_id , and then i add a condition to match the microtime value with the session before locking the Table Row and update my ewallet table

function checkPendingOrders(){
   $orders = $this->orderCollection->filter(['status'=>'pending']);
   foreach($orders as $order){
     //assign unique microtime to session
     $mt = round(microtime(true) * 1000);
     if(!isset($_SESSION['cancel'.$order->getId()])) $_SESSION['cancel'.$order->getId()] = $mt;
     //check if order is ready to be canceled
     $isCanceled = $this->isCanceled($order->getId());
     if($isCanceled === false) continue;
     if($order->getAlreadyRefund() == '0'){ // check if already refund
       $order->setAlreadyRefund('1')->save();
       //check if microtime is the same as the first one that running
       if($_SESSION['cancel'.$order->getId()] == $mt){
        //update using lock row
        $this->_dbConnection->beginTransaction(); 
        $sqlRaws[] =  "SELECT * FROM ewallet WHERE customer_id = ".$order->getCustomerId()." FOR UPDATE;";
        $sqlRaws[] =  "UPDATE ewallet SET balance =(balance+".$order->getPrice().") WHERE customer_id = ".$order->getCustomerId().";";
        foreach ($sqlRaws as $sqlRaw) {
          $this->_dbConnection->query($sqlRaw);
        }
        $this->_dbConnection->commit(); 

       }
     }
     unset($_SESSION['cancel'.$order->getId()]);
     $order->setStatus('canceled')->save();
   }
}

but the problem still persist when i'm doing a strees test, because there is a case when the same function process the same data at the same microtime and start mysql transaction at the same exact time

10
  • 1
    1. Get an explicit WRITE lock on the sales_order table using LOCK TABLES .. 2. Select the orders you want to refund as per your logic. 3. Update the status of these orders that your selected to some intermediate status such as refund_under_process. 4. Release the lock by UNLOCK TABLES 5. Do your processing and update accordingly. – Madhur Bhaiya Aug 23 '19 at 10:42
  • 2
    @MadhurBhaiya 6. Use the answer section when you want to write an answer. – Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 24 '19 at 0:25
  • Not an answer but shouldn't $order->setAlredyRefund('1')->save(); be $order->setAlreadyRefund('1')->save(); It's in both the functions you posted. – Steven Buick Aug 27 '19 at 1:43
  • 1
    The actual problem is that you are doing the same job twice. Find a way to flag orders as being processed, so the next job doesn't even touch them. – Paul Spiegel Aug 28 '19 at 16:33
  • 1
    @Accountantم Yes, something like that. It could also be .. SET status = processing or SET processed_by = <process_id>. Though I would probably use a separate table with order_id, process_id, expires_at, so I can "clean" it from time to time, if some processes fail to delete their own rows. – Paul Spiegel Aug 29 '19 at 17:19

11 Answers 11

8

@Rick James Answer is great as always, he just didn't tell you which data you need to lock.

First just let me comment on what you said

but the problem still persist when i'm doing a strees test,

Concurrency-aware applications are not tested by stress tests only because you are not controlling what is going to happen and you might be unlucky and the test results in the good results, while you still have a sneaky bug in your application - and trust me concurrency bugs are the worst :( -

You need to open 2 clients(DB sessions) and simulate the race condition by your hand, opening 2 connections in MySQL workbench is enough.

Let's do it, open 2 connections in your client (MySQL Workbench or phpMyAdmin) and execute these statements in this order, think of them as your PHP script running at the same time.

**sales_order**
+--------+-------+----------+--------+--------------+-----------+
|order_id| price |product_id| status |already_refund|customer_id|
+--------+-------+----------+--------+--------------+-----------+
|   1    | 1000  |    1     |canceled|      1       |     2     |
|   2    | 2000  |    2     |pending |      0       |     2     |
|   3    | 3000  |    3     |complete|      0       |     1     | 
+--------+-------+----------+--------+--------------+-----------+


(SESSION 1) > select * from sales_order where status = 'pending';
-- result 1 row (order_id 2)
(SESSION 2) > select * from sales_order where status = 'pending';
-- result 1 row (order_id 2)
/*
 >> BUG: Both sessions are reading that order 2 is pending and already_refund is 0

 your session 1 script is going to see that this guy needs to cancel
 and his already_refund column is 0 so it will increase his wallet with 2000
*/
(SESSION 1) > update sales_order set  status = 'canceled' , already_refund = 1
              where  order_id = 2
(SESSION 1) > update ewallet set balance = balance + 2000 where customer_id = 2
/*
 same with your session 2 script : it is going to see that this guy needs
 to cancel and his already_refund column is 0 so it will increase his 
 wallet with 2000
*/
(SESSION 2) > update sales_order set  status = 'canceled' , already_refund = 1
              where  order_id = 2
(SESSION 2) > update ewallet set balance = balance + 2000 where customer_id = 2

Now customer 2 will be happy because of this, and this case is what you asked the question for (imagine if 5 sessions could read the order before it is already_refund is updated to 1 by one of them, customer 2 will be super happy as he is getting 5 * 2000 )

me: Now take your time and think of this scenario, how do you think you can protect yourself from this ? .. ?

you: Locking as @Rick said

me: exactly!

you: ok, now I will go and lock the ewallet table

me : Noo, you need to lock sales_order so SESSION 2 can't read the data until SESSION1 finishes it's work, now let's change the scenario by applying the lock.

(SESSION 1) > START TRANSACTION;
-- MySQL > OK;
(SESSION 2) > START TRANSACTION;
-- MySQL > OK;
(SESSION 1) > select * from sales_order where status = 'pending' FOR UPDATE;
-- MySQL > OK result 1 row (order_id 2)
(SESSION 2) > select * from sales_order where status = 'pending' FOR UPDATE;
-- MySQL > WAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAIT ...... THE DATA IS LOCKED
/*
 now session 2 is waiting for the result of the select query .....

 and session 1 is going to see that this guy needs to cancel and his
 already_refund column is 0 so it will increase his  wallet with 2000
*/
(SESSION 1) > update sales_order set  status = 'canceled' , already_refund = 1
          where  order_id = 2
(SESSION 1) > update ewallet set balance = balance + 2000 where customer_id = 2;
(SESSION 2) >  :/  I am still waiting for the result of the select .....
(SESSION 1) > COMMIT;
-- MySQL > OK , now I will release the lock so any other session can read the data
-- MySQL > I will now execute the select statement of session 2
-- MySQL > the result of the select statement of session 2 is 0 rows
(SESSION 2) >  /* 0 rows ! no pending orders ! 
               Ok just end the transaction, there is nothing to do*/

Now you are happy not customer 2!

Note1:

SELECT * from sales_order where status = 'pending' FOR UPDATE applied in this code might not lock only pending orders as it uses a search condition on status column and not using a unique index

The MySQL manual stated

For locking reads (SELECT with FOR UPDATE or FOR SHARE), UPDATE, and DELETE statements, the locks that are taken depend on whether the statement uses a unique index with a unique search condition, or a range-type search condition.
.......

For other search conditions, and for non-unique indexes, InnoDB locks the index range scanned ...

(and this is one of the most things I hate about MySQL. I wish I lock only the rows returned by the select statement :( )

Note2

I don't know about your application, but if this cron mission is only to cancel the pending orders, then get rid of it and just start the cancellation process when the user cancels his order.

Also if the already_refund column is always updated to 1 along with the status column is updated to canceled then "a canceled order means he is also refunded", and get rid of the already_refund column, extra data = extra work and extra problems


MySQL documentation examples of locking reads scroll down to "Locking Read Examples"

7
+100

If the tables are not already ENGINE=InnoDB, switch tables to InnoDB. See http://mysql.rjweb.org/doc.php/myisam2innodb

Wrap any sequence of operations that needs to be 'atomic' in a "transaction":

START TRANSACTION;
...
COMMIT;

If you have supporting SELECTs in the transaction add FOR UPDATE:

SELECT ... FOR UPDATE;

this blocks other connections.

Check for errors after every SQL statement. If you get a "deadlock" of "wait timeout", the start the transaction over.

Rip out all the "microtime", LOCK TABLES, etc.

The clasic example of a "deadlock" is when one connection grabs two rows and another connection grabs the same rows, but in the opposite order. One of the transactions will be aborted by InnoDB, and anything it has done (inside the transaction) will be undone.

Another thing that can occur is when both connections grab the same rows in the same order. One continues running to completion, while the other is blocked until that completion. There is a default timeout of a generous 50 seconds before an error is given. Normally both go to completion (one after the other) and you are none the wiser.

4
  • thanks, but i still got the same problem, see my updated question – Hunter Aug 26 '19 at 2:36
  • Since you are not doing anything with the results of the SELECT .. FOR UPDATE, it serves no function. Once remove that, you are left with just one statement in the transaction. So, using autocommit instead of begin..commit is just as good. – Rick James Aug 26 '19 at 3:58
  • 1
    You need to do all the work in the database. You still seem to have most of the logic in PHP. – Rick James Aug 26 '19 at 4:02
  • @Hunter - And, you should not trust cron because one instance can overlap the next instance. To avoid this, you need some sort of interlock. Or don't use cron, but instead, use a continually running process. – Rick James Aug 26 '19 at 4:03
7

The microtime idea will add complexity to your code. The $order->getAlreadyRefund() could be getting a value from memory, so it is not a reliable source of truth.

However you can rely on a single update with the conditions that it only updates if the status is still 'pending' and already_refund is still 0. You will have an SQL statement like this:

UPDATE
  sales_order
SET
  status = 'canceled',
  already_refund = %d
where
  order_id = 1
  and status = 'pending'
  and already_refund = 0;

You just need to write a method for your model that will execute the above SQL called setCancelRefund() and you might have something simplier like this:

<?php

function checkPendingOrders() {
   $orders = $this->orderCollection->filter(['status'=>'pending']);

   foreach($orders as $order) {
     //check if order is ready to be canceled
     $isCanceled = $this->isCanceled($order->getId());
     if ($isCanceled === false) {
        continue;
     }

     if ($order->getAlreadyRefund() == '0') { // check if already refund

        // Your new method should do the following
        // UPDATE sales_order SET status = 'canceled', already_refund = 1 where order_id = %d and status = 'pending' and already_refund = 0; 
        $affected_rows = $order->setCancelRefund();        

        if ($affected_rows == 0) {
            continue;
        }

        $this->refund($order->getId()); //refund the money to customer ewallet
     }

   }
}
5
  • No, this is similarly not safe for concurrency. – Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 24 '19 at 0:23
  • @LightnessRacesinOrbit Can you please explain why ? I think it is safe for this question case. – Accountant م Aug 27 '19 at 3:54
  • What happens when this function is invoked in parallel? You can refund twice. Not good! Classic race condition here. – Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 27 '19 at 10:31
  • @LightnessRacesinOrbit umm, I guess no, if the function invoked in parallel, one of them must run the update statement before the other and get affected_rows 1 and refund, the other will get affected_rows 0 and will not refund, I know this is not the natural solution but it still a workaround and will protect from the race condition in this question case. (or there is something I missed ? ) – Accountant م Aug 27 '19 at 20:03
  • Thank you guys for your feedback. I understand why it's not completely safe. No worries. It was just a solution where you don't have to change the db engine. – jasonwubz Aug 27 '19 at 20:43
3

There is a simple solution to this problem. Use a query of the form UPDATE sales_order SET already_refund = 1 WHERE already_refund = 0 AND id = ? The result of the update should include the number of affected rows which will be zero or one. If it's one, great do the ewallet otherwise it was updated by another process.

4
  • Nice workaround, but what if the script crashed before updating the ewallet, he will end up by already_refund is 1 and no money in the eWallet, As Rick James said including the statements that need to be atmoic in a transaction is the natural solution for these problems. Nice idea though – Accountant م Aug 27 '19 at 3:34
  • 2
    Yes you can do what I said in a transaction with the ewallet part only executing if affected rows is 1. – karmakaze Aug 27 '19 at 3:39
  • Oh sorry I thought you mean out of transaction, yes this is a nice option and will protect from the race condition. – Accountant م Aug 27 '19 at 3:46
  • @Accountantم well I can imagine other cases where outside a Tx might be appropriate, like send a notification after a change is committed--but in this example a Tx is best. – karmakaze Aug 27 '19 at 20:54
2

You might want to use a Pidfile. A Pidfile contains the process id of a given program. There will be two checks: firstly, if the file itself exists and secondly, if the process id in the file is that of a running process.

<?php

class Mutex {

    function lock() {

        /**
         * $_SERVER['PHP_SELF'] returns the current script being executed.
         * Ff your php file is located at http://www.yourserver.com/script.php,
         * PHP_SELF will contain script.php
         *
         * /!\ Do note that depending on the distribution, /tmp/ content might be cleared
         * periodically!
         */
        $pidfile = '/tmp/' . basename($_SERVER['PHP_SELF']) . '.pid';
        if (file_exists($pidfile)) {
            $pid = file_get_contents($pidfile);
            /**
             * Signal 0 is used to check whether a process exists or not
             */
            $running = posix_kill($pid, 0);
            if ($running) {
                /**
                 * Process already running
                 */
                exit("process running"); // terminates script
            } else {
                /**
                 * Pidfile contains a pid of a process that isn't running, remove the file
                 */
                unlink($pidfile);
            }
        }
        $handle = fopen($pidfile, 'x'); // stream
        if (!$handle) {
            exit("File already exists or was not able to create it");
        }
        $pid = getmypid();
        fwrite($handle, $pid); // write process id of current process

        register_shutdown_function(array($this, 'unlock')); // runs on exit or when the script terminates

        return true;
    }

    function unlock() {
        $pidfile = '/tmp/' . basename($_SERVER['PHP_SELF']) . '.pid';
        if (file_exists($pidfile)) {
            unlink($pidfile);
        }
    }
}

You can use it this way:

$mutex = new Mutex();
$mutex->lock();
// do something
$mutex->unlock();

So, if there are two concurrent cron processes (it has to be the same file!), if one took the lock, the other one will terminate.

2
  • @LightnessRacesinOrbit you're right! And to think that I thought about SQL transactions first. I don't know why I went for this solution. Still, it would work. – jperl Aug 24 '19 at 11:49
  • I disagree- there shouldn't be two copies of a cron like this running simultaneously. It's a waste of system resources... You only need to check for refundable orders every couple minutes, why are there two copies of the same script running like this? – msEmmaMays Aug 27 '19 at 23:14
2

Apart from transaction like Rick James's answer shows.

You can use a schedule rules to make specific job only can be processed by one worker.

For example the job with even id scheduled to work 1, and with odd id scheduled to work2.

2

For do that you must use mysql TRANSACTION and use SELECT FOR UPDATE.
https://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/8.0/en/innodb-locking-reads.html

If you are using PDO, your Function setAlredyRefund() can be look somthig like that:

function setAlredyRefund($orderID){
    try{
        $pdo->beginTransaction();

        $sql = "SELECT * FROM sales_order WHERE order_id = :order_id AND already_refund = 0 FOR UPDATE";
        $stmt = $pdo->prepare($sql);
        $stmt->bindParam(":orderID", $orderID, PDO::PARAM_INT);
        $stmt->execute();       

        $sql = "UPDATE sales_order SET already_refund = 1";
        $stmt = $pdo->prepare($sql);
        $stmt->execute();       

        $pdo->commit();

    } 

    catch(Exception $e){    
        echo $e->getMessage();    
        $pdo->rollBack();
    }
}
2

If I were you, I would make it a two-step process: instead of having a column "already_refund" I would have a column "refund_status" and the cron job would first change this column to "to_refund" and then, on the next cron job of the same type or in a different cron job, when the actual refund occurs, change it again to "refunded".

I know that maybe you can accomplish this at the same time but many times it is better to have a more comprehensible code/process even though it may take a little more time. Especially when you are dealing with money...

2

Here is simple solution with one lock file:

<?php

// semaphore read lock status
$file_sem = fopen( "sem.txt", "r" );
$str = fgets( $file_sem );
fclose( $file_sem );
$secs_last_mod_file = time() - filemtime( "sem.txt" );

// if ( in file lock value ) and ( difference in time between current time and time of file modifcation less than 600 seconds ),
// then it means the same process running in another thread
if( ( $str == "2" ) && ( $secs_last_mod_file < 600 ) )
{
    die( "\n" . "----die can't put lock in file" . "\n" );
}
// semaphore open lock
$file_sem = fopen( "sem.txt", "w" );
fputs( $file_sem, "2" );
fflush( $file_sem );
fclose( $file_sem );


// Put your code here


// semaphore close lock
$file_sem = fopen( "sem.txt", "w" );
fputs( $file_sem, "1" );
fclose( $file_sem );

?>

I use this solution in my sites.

-1

This is the common phenomena in OS, For this Mutex has introduced. By using Mutex lock you can stop write operation at the same time. Use the Mutex together with your if condition to avoid duplication refund.

For the detailed understanding follow these 2 links:

https://www.php.net/manual/en/mutex.lock.php

https://paulcourt.co.uk/article/cross-server-locking-with-mysql-php

6
  • i'm using a basic php , not php-pecl. i don't have an access to install this php-pecl – Hunter Aug 21 '19 at 8:12
  • Then you can follow the 2nd link. We need locking at our DB when we are using MyISAM search engine. Another solution is that you can convert your search engine to innoDB to save from any extra work and hurdle. – Maryam Aslam Aug 21 '19 at 9:15
  • And conversion from MyISAM to InnoDB is very easy . Use "ALTER TABLE tablename ENGINE=InnoDB;" – Maryam Aslam Aug 21 '19 at 9:22
  • No, each PHP invocation is separate, so a mutex cannot help you. Databases have atomicity built into them - just read your MySQL book and use transactions. – Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 24 '19 at 0:25
  • @LightnessRacesinOrbit Thank you for correcting me. Yes solution must be implemented at database level, not at the code level. – Maryam Aslam Aug 26 '19 at 10:25
-1

If i understand, when you say "2 different cron schedule can process the same data at the same time", your saying that 2 instance of the script can run at the same time if the first instance takes more than 5 minutes to complete the task ?

I don't know what part of your code takes the most time, but i guess it is the refunding process itself. What i would do in a case like this is:

  1. Select a limited number of orders with status = 'pending'
  2. Immediately update all of the selected orders to something like status='refunding'
  3. Process the refunds and update the corresponding order to status='cancelled' after each refund.

This way if another cron job is started, it will select an entirely different set of pending orders to process.

2
  • yes the different cron can process to cancel the same order at the same time at some point – Hunter Aug 21 '19 at 8:08
  • 1
    The amount of time taken is irrelevant. If the function (in whatever form) may be invoked concurrently, it must be atomic. Simple as that. – Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 24 '19 at 0:24

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