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I am trying to understand bit and byte manipulation and I have seen many examples in SO. Still, I have some questions regarding my understanding.

First, lets say we have a byte array with the byte order as Least Significant Byte. I want to get the byte 2 from this array. I can get the byte like byte[1]. Am I right?

Second, we have a byte array with the byte order as Least Significant Byte. And I want to get first 2 bits of the byte 1!. How can I get the first 2 bits from that byte? Also, how can I add a number into the first 2 bits of a byte?

Any help or link to understand those logics are much appreciated.

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  • You can bitwise operators like shits (<< and >>) and $. Or you can use bitfields. – andresantacruz Aug 21 '19 at 8:59
  • "I can get the byte and use it without any modification right?" this question is unclear to me. What you mean by "get it and use it without any modification"? – andresantacruz Aug 21 '19 at 9:02
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    Huh, if you have a byte array and you want byte 2 out of it it's either array[1] or array[2] depending on what you mean by 2 (second or index 2). LSB, MSB is irrelevant because you have a byte array and you want a byte. Please read your question again and check you've used the correct word (bit/ byte) in all places. I think you've mixed them up – Caius Jard Aug 21 '19 at 9:05
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    More info: How do you set, clear, and toggle a single bit? – Lundin Aug 21 '19 at 9:11
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    @Dennis.M There only exists one bit order on all computers. Bit 7 is always the MSB. – Lundin Aug 21 '19 at 9:34
2

First, lets say we have a byte array with the byte order as LSB. I want to get the byte 2 from this array. I can get the byte like byte[1]. Am I right?

Yes.

Second, we have a byte array with the byte order as LSB. And I want to get first 2 bits of the byte 1!. How can I get the first 2 bits from that byte? Also, how can I add a number into the first 2 bits of a byte?

You can use the bitwise AND operator & with the constant 3 to retrieve only the first two bits. By doing num & 3 it will realize a condition operation between each bit of num and 3 returning 1 as resultant bit only if both bits are 1. As 3 have only its 2 first bits set, every bit in num other than the first 2 will be ignored.

unsigned char foo = 47;
unsigned char twobits = foo & 3; // this will return only the value of the two bits of foo.
unsigned char number_to_add = 78;
twobits &= (number_to_add & 3); // this will get the values of the 2 bits of number_to_add_ and then assign it to the 2 bits of variable twobits.

Or if you don't care of the endianess you can use bitfields:

struct st_foo
{
     unsigned char bit1 : 1;
     unsigned char bit2 : 1;
     unsigned char the_rest : 6;
};

struct st_foo my_byte;
my_byte.bit1 = 1;
my_byte.bit2 = 0;
7
  • There's no guarantee that "bit1" in your bit-field example is the LSB. Furthermore, bits are always enumerated from 0 to 7, not from 1 to 8. – Lundin Aug 21 '19 at 9:32
  • Also, unsigned char need not be a valid type to be used for bit-fields, it isn't guaranteed to work by the standard. Your example relies on compiler-specific extensions. – Lundin Aug 21 '19 at 9:36
  • @Lundin I don't think if I got it. C standard doesn't rules bit-fields? Please elaborate a bit more. – andresantacruz Aug 21 '19 at 9:38
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    No, you can treat it as a chunk of binary, containing 3 other chunks of binary, in unspecified order. Yes, code that uses bit-fields is very implementation-specific and completely non-portable, while at the same time not offering any advantages. – Lundin Aug 21 '19 at 10:36
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    Bitwise operations are so incredibly common that they should be readable to any C programmer. Long as the number of operations on a single line are kept low. – Lundin Aug 21 '19 at 10:41

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