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I'm creating a program that prints out the music scale the user wants to use (i.e. The C Major Scale) The Major Scale uses a semi-tone pattern which is 2 - 2 - 1 - 2 - 2 - 2 - 1

I'm new, so am not sure what my other options are. Sorry for the ignorance!

keys = ["C", "C#", "D", "D#", "E", "F", "F#", "G", "G#", "A", "A#", "B"]

i = 0
while i < len(keys):
    print(keys[i])
    i += 2


# Output after being run:

C
D
E
F#
G#
A#

# Expected output
C
D
E
F
G
A
B

I apologize if this is poorly explained.

  • I don't know much about C Major Scale, but you're printing only the items without cardinal (#), is this a pattern or just a coincidence? – Pedro Lobito Aug 22 at 1:00
  • It's the pattern. Say I wanted to use D Major instead of C Major. I'd start at D and use the pattern, which would give me: D, E, F#, G, A, B, C# – Caleb Schilling Aug 22 at 1:04
  • If it's a pattern, why not use if not "#" in key do something ? Sorry for my lack of musical qualities! – Pedro Lobito Aug 22 at 1:06
  • @PedroLobito Because it doesn't have to be C major. The OP posted that as an example only. – Selcuk Aug 22 at 1:06
  • 1
    @Selcuk Ok, I understood what OP wants after seeing your answer. – Pedro Lobito Aug 22 at 1:08
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The existing answers here are largely correct, but will only work for the key of C. If you were to start with any other note, your code would fail with:

IndexError: list index out of range

This is because starting from, say, D and following the increment pattern, you end up falling off the end of the keys array. One way to solve this is to append the keys array to itself, like this:

selected_key = 'D'
keys = ["C", "C#", "D", "D#", "E", "F", "F#", "G", "G#", "A", "A#", "B"]
major_scale = [2, 2, 1, 2, 2, 2, 1]

mark = keys.index(selected_key)
for inc in major_scale:
    print((keys + keys)[mark])  # <-- Here is where we double the keys array
    mark += inc                 #      to avoid falling off the end.

The above would result in:

D
E
F#
G
A
B
C#
  • Holy crapy I love you for your knowledge!! This was exactly what I needed : D – Caleb Schilling Aug 22 at 1:12
  • Do you mind explaining this? Sorry if it's too much to ask...I just want to understand why you did what you did! @larsks – Caleb Schilling Aug 22 at 1:26
  • I'm really just making the keys array look like ["C", "C#", "D", "D#", "E", "F", "F#", "G", "G#", "A", "A#", "B", "C", "C#", "D", "D#", "E", "F", "F#", "G", "G#", "A", "A#", "B"], so that if you start at, say, D and walk up a major scale, you can go past B and continue on to C# without running out of items. This happens in the expression (keys + keys); with lists, + appends the two lists together. – larsks Aug 22 at 1:54
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One way to do it would be to keep the increments in an array themselves, and iterate over that:

keys = # ...
steps = [2, 2, 1, 2, 2, 2, 1]

i = 0
for increment in steps:
    print(keys[i])
    i += increment

If you wanted to start at a note other than C, you'd need to avoid "index out of range" errors by taking the remainder of i / len(keys):

# ...
for increment in steps:
    print(keys[i % len(keys)])
    i += increment
  • Wow thanks. That's pretty incredible. So what if i wanted to start at a different index than 0 (aka 'C'). What if I wanted to start at index 4 (aka 'E')? – Caleb Schilling Aug 22 at 1:08
  • Take a look at my answer, which I posted specifically to address that situation... – larsks Aug 22 at 1:10
  • @larsks's approach would work, or you could just take the remainder of i divided by the number of keys. (I'll update my answer to include that.) – Harry Cutts Aug 22 at 1:11
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You must define the pattern somewhere to achieve that. A list is a suitable data structure for that purpose, for example:

keys = ["C", "C#", "D", "D#", "E", "F", "F#", "G", "G#", "A", "A#", "B"]
pattern_major = [2, 2, 1, 2, 2, 2, 1]
i = 0
for p in pattern_major:
    print(keys[i])
    i += p

Now this will only work for C major as it will run out of keys if you start with a different key. To make it circular, try this (for D major, for example):

...
i = 2  # D
for p in pattern_major:
    print(keys[i])
    i = (i + p) % len(keys)

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