24

Suppose I have the following ObservableObject, which generates a random String every second:

import SwiftUI

class SomeObservable: ObservableObject {

    @Published var information: String = ""

    init() {
        Timer.scheduledTimer(
            timeInterval: 1.0,
            target: self,
            selector: #selector(updateInformation),
            userInfo: nil,
            repeats: true
        ).fire()
    }

    @objc func updateInformation() {
        information = String("RANDOM_INFO".shuffled().prefix(5))
    }
}

And a View, which observes that:

struct SomeView: View {

    @ObservedObject var observable: SomeObservable

    var body: some View {
        Text(observable.information)
    }
}

The above will work as expected.
The View redraws itself when the ObservableObject changes:

viewUpdate

Now for the question:

How could I do the same (say calling a function) in a "pure" struct that also observes the same ObservableObject? By "pure" I mean something that does not conform to View:

struct SomeStruct {

    @ObservedObject var observable: SomeObservable

    // How to call this function when "observable" changes?
    func doSomethingWhenObservableChanges() {
        print("Triggered!")
    }
}

(It could also be a class, as long as it's able to react to the changes on the observable.)

It seems to be conceptually very easy, but I'm clearly missing something.

(Note: I'm using Xcode 11, beta 6.)


Update (for future readers) (paste in a Playground)

Here is a possible solution, based on the awesome answer provided by @Fabian:

import SwiftUI
import Combine
import PlaygroundSupport

class SomeObservable: ObservableObject {

    @Published var information: String = "" // Will be automagically consumed by `Views`.

    let updatePublisher = PassthroughSubject<Void, Never>() // Can be consumed by other classes / objects.

    // Added here only to test the whole thing.
    var someObserverClass: SomeObserverClass?

    init() {
        // Randomly change the information each second.
        Timer.scheduledTimer(
            timeInterval: 1.0,
            target: self,
            selector: #selector(updateInformation),
            userInfo: nil,
            repeats: true
        ).fire()    }

    @objc func updateInformation() {
        // For testing purposes only.
        if someObserverClass == nil { someObserverClass = SomeObserverClass(observable: self) }

        // `Views` will detect this right away.
        information = String("RANDOM_INFO".shuffled().prefix(5))

        // "Manually" sending updates, so other classes / objects can be notified.
        updatePublisher.send()
    }
}

class SomeObserverClass {

    @ObservedObject var observable: SomeObservable

    // More on AnyCancellable on: apple-reference-documentation://hs-NDfw7su
    var cancellable: AnyCancellable?

    init(observable: SomeObservable) {
        self.observable = observable

        // `sink`: Attaches a subscriber with closure-based behavior.
        cancellable = observable.updatePublisher
            .print() // Prints all publishing events.
            .sink(receiveValue: { [weak self] _ in
            guard let self = self else { return }
            self.doSomethingWhenObservableChanges()
        })
    }

    func doSomethingWhenObservableChanges() {
        print(observable.information)
    }
}

let observable = SomeObservable()

struct SomeObserverView: View {
    @ObservedObject var observable: SomeObservable
    var body: some View {
        Text(observable.information)
    }
}
PlaygroundPage.current.setLiveView(SomeObserverView(observable: observable))

Result

result

(Note: it's necessary to run the app in order to check the console output.)

2
  • Does it have to be a struct?
    – Fabian
    Aug 22 '19 at 10:40
  • Not necessarily. It could be a class. I'll update the question. Aug 22 '19 at 10:47
22

The old way was to use callbacks which you registered. The newer method is to use the Combine framework to create publishers for which you can registers further processing, or in this case a sink which gets called every time the source publisher sends a message. The publisher here sends nothing and so is of type <Void, Never>.

Timer publisher

To get a publisher from a timer can be done directly through Combine or creating a generic publisher through PassthroughSubject<Void, Never>(), registering for messages and sending them in the timer-callback via publisher.send(). The example has both variants.

ObjectWillChange Publisher

Every ObservableObject does have an .objectWillChange publisher for which you can register a sink the same as you do for Timer publishers. It should get called every time you call it or every time a @Published variable changes. Note however, that is being called before, and not after the change. (DispatchQueue.main.async{} inside the sink to react after the change is complete).

Registering

Every sink call creates an AnyCancellable which has to be stored, usually in the object with the same lifetime the sink should have. Once the cancellable is deconstructed (or .cancel() on it is called) the sink does not get called again.

import SwiftUI
import Combine

struct ReceiveOutsideView: View {
    #if swift(>=5.3)
        @StateObject var observable: SomeObservable = SomeObservable()
    #else
        @ObservedObject var observable: SomeObservable = SomeObservable()
    #endif

    var body: some View {
        Text(observable.information)
            .onReceive(observable.publisher) {
                print("Updated from Timer.publish")
        }
        .onReceive(observable.updatePublisher) {
            print("Updated from updateInformation()")
        }
    }
}

class SomeObservable: ObservableObject {
    
    @Published var information: String = ""
    
    var publisher: AnyPublisher<Void, Never>! = nil
    
    init() {
        
        publisher = Timer.publish(every: 1.0, on: RunLoop.main, in: .common).autoconnect().map{_ in
            print("Updating information")
            //self.information = String("RANDOM_INFO".shuffled().prefix(5))
        }.eraseToAnyPublisher()
        
        Timer.scheduledTimer(
            timeInterval: 1.0,
            target: self,
            selector: #selector(updateInformation),
            userInfo: nil,
            repeats: true
        ).fire()
    }
    
    let updatePublisher = PassthroughSubject<Void, Never>()
    
    @objc func updateInformation() {
        information = String("RANDOM_INFO".shuffled().prefix(5))
        updatePublisher.send()
    }
}

class SomeClass {
    
    @ObservedObject var observable: SomeObservable
    
    var cancellable: AnyCancellable?
    
    init(observable: SomeObservable) {
        self.observable = observable
        
        cancellable = observable.publisher.sink{ [weak self] in
            guard let self = self else {
                return
            }
            
            self.doSomethingWhenObservableChanges() // Must be a class to access self here.
        }
    }
    
    // How to call this function when "observable" changes?
    func doSomethingWhenObservableChanges() {
        print("Triggered!")
    }
}

Note here that if no sink or receiver at the end of the pipeline is registered, the value will be lost. For example creating PassthroughSubject<T, Never>, immediately sending a value and aftererwards returning the publisher makes the messages sent get lost, despite you registering a sink on that subject afterwards. The usual workaround is to wrap the subject creation and message sending inside a Deferred {} block, which only creates everything within, once a sink got registered.

A commenter notes that ReceiveOutsideView.observable is owned by ReceiveOutsideView, because observable is created inside and directly assigned. On reinitialization a new instance of observable will be created. This can be prevented by use of @StateObject instead of @ObservableObject in this instance.

7
  • It's a little more complex than I thought -- but you nailed it. I updated my question with a working example, based on your answer. Thanks for your time and explanation, which also includes the Timer publisher... Very useful. 👍🏻 Aug 22 '19 at 12:05
  • It is more important if it is possible to update a @Published value outside a View - from a regular code. Say I'm reading a value from DB and want this value to be updated in a View.
    – thstart
    Sep 2 '19 at 19:59
  • That is what ObservableObject is made for so yes. Published is only special in that it calls objectWillChange at the right time. Any views using values from the ObservableObject should get reevaluated (my best guess).
    – Fabian
    Sep 2 '19 at 20:02
  • Note, that with the introduction of @StateObject ReceiveOutsideView should have it's observable property as a StateObject rather than an ObservableObject because it owns / holds the instance.
    – lenny
    Jun 5 '21 at 6:24
  • 1
    @lenny good point, I updated the answer. Though StateObject is >=5.3 so not everyone will be able to use it yet, but definitely in the future.
    – Fabian
    Jun 5 '21 at 6:38

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.