1

I have been reading this issue which shows a trivial example of how multiple mutable borrows can throw this error "cannot borrow point as mutable more than once at a time":

struct Point {
    x: f64,
    y: f64
}

impl Point {
    pub fn x_mut(&mut self) -> &mut f64 {
        &mut self.x
    }

    pub fn y_mut(&mut self) -> &mut f64 {
        &mut self.y
    }
}

fn main() {
    let mut point = Point { x: 1.0, y: 2.0 };
    let x_mut = point.x_mut();
    let y_mut = point.y_mut();

    *x_mut *= 2.0;
    *y_mut *= 2.0;
} 

But then came the part which confused me.

The lifetime elision rules make it pretty clear why this happens: x_mut() returns a mutable borrow that has to live at least as long as the mutable borrow of self

How does the fact that the mutable borrow should exist as long self explain this error?

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  • Variable x_mut has to exit scope (older Rust) or stop being used (newer non-lexical lifetimes Rust) in order for the mutable borrow of point to be finished. As long as one mutable borrow is active, a second one (point for variable y_mut) cannot be established. The method signatures say &mut self, but in context of main, that self refers to point.
    – Erik Eidt
    Aug 23, 2019 at 5:49

2 Answers 2

3

Variable x_mut has to exit scope (older Rust) or stop being used (newer non-lexical lifetimes Rust) in order for the mutable borrow of point to be finished. As long as one mutable borrow is active, a second one (point for variable y_mut) cannot be established. The method signatures say &mut self, but in context of main, that self refers to point.

         |
 +->  18 |     let x_mut = point.x_mut();
 |       |                 ----- first mutable borrow occurs here
 |    19 |     let y_mut = point.y_mut();
 |       |                 ^^^^^ second mutable borrow occurs here
 |    20 | 
 +->  21 |     *x_mut *= 2.0;
         |     ------------- first borrow later used here

The extent of the first borrow is from 18 thru 21, and, you cannot have another mutable borrow of point within that range.  So 19 is flagged as an error.  line 19's code can happily occur after line 21, so the following is legal:

fn main() {
    let mut point = Point { x: 1.0, y: 2.0 };

    let x_mut = point.x_mut();
    *x_mut *= 2.0;

    let y_mut = point.y_mut();
    *y_mut *= 2.0;
} 
3
  • Two mutable reference to disjoint fields can coexist. Thats what he is trying to achieve in this. But what i dont understand is how the lifetime of self related to this as he suggests and the mock solution to this problem.
    – raj
    Aug 23, 2019 at 6:51
  • The code you asked about tells the borrow checker that you want to make a mutable borrow of point so that the mutable borrowed return value of .x_mut() can live for as long as the code in main needs it. Thus, the invocation of point.x_mut() establishes a borrow of point that the compiler takes to live as long as the return result lives. Since the borrowed return result lives for a time, the mutable borrow of point is taken to live that long as well. Thus, a second mutable borrow of point for the call to point.y_mut() is not possible within the window of the first such borrow.
    – Erik Eidt
    Aug 23, 2019 at 15:30
  • As far as overlapping borrows of disjoint fields, it is possible and a good question: it easy to do directly, but it is the encapsulation into methods that makes it tricky; suggest you (search for that and/or) ask it directly in a separate question. For example, see here where we borrow both x and y mutably but in a single method, which uses only one mutable borrow of point.
    – Erik Eidt
    Aug 23, 2019 at 15:54
2

I think your intuition is correct in that the lifetime elision rules don't really explain this. Part of the problem is that the example contains some red herrings. For instance you could comment out:

*y_mut *= 2.0;

and still get the error. Also you don't need to actually use x_mut as mutable to get the error. This simpler version illustrates the same problem:

fn main() {
    let mut point = Point { x: 1.0, y: 2.0 };
    let x_mut = point.x_mut();
    let y_mut = point.y_mut();

    println!("x_mut = {}", x_mut);
}

If you comment out the y_mut line or even if you move that line after the call to println!() it works fine. So it's just like you said at the start, you can't have multiple mutable references to point at the same time.

Note that I'm referring only to your post and not the discussion you linked to which I haven't read.

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