107

React is complaining about code below, saying it useEffect is being called conditionally:

import React, { useEffect, useState } from 'react'
import VerifiedUserOutlined from '@material-ui/icons/VerifiedUserOutlined'
import withStyles from '@material-ui/core/styles/withStyles'
import firebase from '../firebase'
import { withRouter } from 'react-router-dom'

function Dashboard(props) {
  const { classes } = props
  
  const [quote, setQuote] = useState('')

    if(!firebase.getCurrentUsername()) {
        // not logged in
        alert('Please login first')
        props.history.replace('/login')
        return null
    }

    useEffect(() => {
        firebase.getCurrentUserQuote().then(setQuote)
    })

    return (
        <main>
            // some code here
        </main>
    )

    async function logout() {
        await firebase.logout()
        props.history.push('/')
    }
}

export default withRouter(withStyles(styles)(Dashboard))

And that returns me the error:

React Hook "useEffect" is called conditionally. React Hooks must be called in the exact same order in every component render.

Does anyone happen to know what the problem here is?

2
  • 2
    return null? from if condition? A component can only return valid JSX
    – A dev
    Aug 23, 2019 at 6:34
  • 7
    @NatGeo null is a valid JSX expression stackoverflow.com/q/42083181/1176601 ... but the code after return is only executed when the if statement is false, similar to else { ... } - a.k.a. "conditionally" which is forbidden by rules-of-hooks
    – Aprillion
    Aug 23, 2019 at 6:51

6 Answers 6

110

Your code, after an if statement that contains return, is equivalent to an else branch:

if(!firebase.getCurrentUsername()) {
    ...
    return null
} else {
    useEffect(...)
    ...
}

Which means that it's executed conditionally (only when the return is NOT executed).

To fix:

useEffect(() => {
  if(firebase.getCurrentUsername()) {
    firebase.getCurrentUserQuote().then(setQuote)
  }
}, [firebase.getCurrentUsername(), firebase.getCurrentUserQuote()])

if(!firebase.getCurrentUsername()) {
  ...
  return null
}
0
24

Don’t call Hooks inside loops, conditions, or nested functions. Instead, always use Hooks at the top level of your React function. You can follow the documentation here.

I couldn't find the use case in the above code. If you need the effect to run when the return value of firebase.getCurrentUsername() changes, you might want to use it outside the if condition like:

useEffect(() => {
    firebase.getCurrentUserQuote().then(setQuote)
}, [firebase.getCurrentUsername()]);
1
  • 10
    while true, this does not address the question.
    – Aprillion
    Aug 23, 2019 at 6:35
15

I had a similar problem with the same error message, where the order of variable declarations was the source of the error:

Bad example

if (loading) return <>loading...</>;
if (error) return <>Error! {error.message}</>;

const [reload, setReload] = useState(false);

Good example

const [reload, setReload] = useState(false);

if (loading) return <>loading...</>;
if (error) return <>Error! {error.message}</>;

The hook needs to be created before potential conditional return blocks

7

you can not call hooks conditionally because React relies on the order in which Hooks are called

you can refer rules of hooks from react official docs https://reactjs.org/docs/hooks-rules.html#explanation

Explanation we can use multiple State or Effect Hooks in a single component:

function Form() {
  // 1. Use the name state variable
  const [name, setName] = useState('Mary');

  // 2. Use an effect for persisting the form
  useEffect(function persistForm() {
    localStorage.setItem('formData', name);
  });

  // 3. Use the surname state variable
  const [surname, setSurname] = useState('Poppins');

  // 4. Use an effect for updating the title
  useEffect(function updateTitle() {
    document.title = name + ' ' + surname;
  });

  // ...
}

So how does React know which state corresponds to which useState call? The answer is that React relies on the order in which Hooks are called. Our example works because the order of the Hook calls is the same on every render:

// ------------
// First render
// ------------
useState('Mary')           // 1. Initialize the name state variable with 'Mary'
useEffect(persistForm)     // 2. Add an effect for persisting the form
useState('Poppins')        // 3. Initialize the surname state variable with 'Poppins'
useEffect(updateTitle)     // 4. Add an effect for updating the title

// -------------
// Second render
// -------------
useState('Mary')           // 1. Read the name state variable (argument is ignored)
useEffect(persistForm)     // 2. Replace the effect for persisting the form
useState('Poppins')        // 3. Read the surname state variable (argument is ignored)
useEffect(updateTitle)     // 4. Replace the effect for updating the title

// ...

As long as the order of the Hook calls is the same between renders, React can associate some local state with each of them. But what happens if we put a Hook call (for example, the persistForm effect) inside a condition?

 // 🔴 We're breaking the first rule by using a Hook in a condition
  if (name !== '') {
    useEffect(function persistForm() {
      localStorage.setItem('formData', name);
    });
  }

The name !== '' condition is true on the first render, so we run this Hook. However, on the next render the user might clear the form, making the condition false. Now that we skip this Hook during rendering, the order of the Hook calls becomes different:

useState('Mary')           // 1. Read the name state variable (argument is ignored)
// useEffect(persistForm)  // 🔴 This Hook was skipped!
useState('Poppins')        // 🔴 2 (but was 3). Fail to read the surname state variable
useEffect(updateTitle)     // 🔴 3 (but was 4). Fail to replace the effect

React wouldn’t know what to return for the second useState Hook call. React expected that the second Hook call in this component corresponds to the persistForm effect, just like during the previous render, but it doesn’t anymore. From that point, every next Hook call after the one we skipped would also shift by one, leading to bugs.

This is why Hooks must be called on the top level of our components. If we want to run an effect conditionally, we can put that condition inside our Hook:

  useEffect(function persistForm() {
    // 👍 We're not breaking the first rule anymore
    if (name !== '') {
      localStorage.setItem('formData', name);
    }
  });

Note that you don’t need to worry about this problem if you use the provided lint rule. But now you also know why Hooks work this way, and which issues the rule is preventing.

2

The issue here is that when we are returning null from the if block, the useEffect hook code will be unreachable, since we returned before it, and hence the error that it is being called conditionally.

You might want to define all the hooks first and then start writing the logic for rendering, be it null or empty string, or a valid JSX.

1

I would argue there is a way to call hooks conditionally. You just have to export some members from that hook. Copy-paste this snippet in codesandbox:

import React from "react";
import ReactDOM from "react-dom";

function useFetch() {
  return {
    todos: () =>
      fetch("https://jsonplaceholder.typicode.com/todos/1").then(response =>
        response.json()
      )
  };
}

const App = () => {
  const fetch = useFetch(); // get a reference to the hook

  if ("called conditionally") {
    fetch.todos().then(({title}) => 
      console.log("it works: ", title)); // it works:  delectus aut autem  
  }

  return null;
};

const rootElement = document.getElementById("root");
ReactDOM.render(<App />, rootElement);

Here's an example with a wrapped useEffect:

import React, { useEffect } from "react";
import ReactDOM from "react-dom";

function useWrappedEffect() {
  const [runEffect, setRunEffect] = React.useState(false);

  useEffect(() => {
    if (runEffect) {
      console.log("running");
      setRunEffect(false);
    }
  }, [runEffect]);

  return {
    run: () => {
      setRunEffect(true);
    }
  };
}

const App = () => {
  const myEffect = useWrappedEffect(); // get a reference to the hook
  const [run, setRun] = React.useState(false);

  if (run) {
    myEffect.run();
    setRun(false);
  }

  return (
    <button
      onClick={() => {
        setRun(true);
      }}
    >
      Run
    </button>
  );
};

const rootElement = document.getElementById("root");
ReactDOM.render(<App />, rootElement);
5
  • Your useFetch is not a hook. It does not use useState or useEffect (or any other React core hooks)
    – DLight
    Mar 16, 2021 at 10:12
  • I kept the example to a minimum. Feel free to make use of useState inside if you like 😉 Mar 17, 2021 at 10:17
  • The question is about useEffect, could you update your example to use that? Because I don't see how it would work.
    – DLight
    Mar 18, 2021 at 11:55
  • Thanks! But it's misleading, you don't "have to export some members from that hook" to trigger the useEffect conditionally. As I understand, the key is to put an if inside the useEffect. (Also I see you used two states, we don't need both)
    – DLight
    Mar 21, 2021 at 21:20
  • Yes the key is to put an if statement inside useEffect. I know my answer is not exactly the solution to the problem, but overall it's a powerfull concept since you can extract logic in a separate custom hook (not actually the native useEffect) and use it wherever afterwords Mar 22, 2021 at 15:24

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