6

As far as I'm aware nullptr is a part of the core language.

Quoting C++11: (18.2/9)

nullptr_t is defined as follows:

namespace std { typedef decltype(nullptr) nullptr_t; }

and is defined in the header <cstddef>.

  • 3
    related/maybe dupe: stackoverflow.com/questions/39080709/… – NathanOliver Aug 23 at 14:45
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    You don't need nullptr_t if you are willing to live with decltype(nullptr). nullptr_t isn't a core concept, it's a helper. – François Andrieux Aug 23 at 14:49
  • You need nullptr_t sometimes: "If two or more overloads accept different pointer types, an overload for std::nullptr_t is necessary to accept a null pointer argument." (cppreference for std::nullptr_t). – Adrian Aug 23 at 15:08
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    @Adrian I'm assuming you meant to reply to my comment. If so, I said you don't need nullptr_t if you are willing to live with decltype(nullptr). You can use decltype(nullptr) instead of nullptr_t. nullptr_t is just a convenient alias for decltype(nullptr);. You should use nullptr_t, my comment is meant to indicate why nullptr_t might not be part of the core language. – François Andrieux Aug 23 at 15:10
  • Also by making nullptr part of the language, it is much easier to ensure that it works as it should because you can easily have specific rules. – Phil1970 Aug 24 at 14:42
4

The proposal that introduced nullptr, N2431, indicates in section 1.1 that it was desirable to not force users to include a header in order to use nullptr.

It also remarks, "We do not expect to see much direct use of nullptr_t in real programs". Thus, it was considered preferable to add nullptr_t to the library rather than create a new keyword only to be used for this obscure purpose. In addition, if you don't want to include the header, you can always just write decltype(nullptr) yourself.

  • this actually answers the question. – bolov Aug 23 at 16:29
7

Because it can. A central aim in the C++ standardization process is to alter the core language as little as possible when adding to the language.

nullptr usurps the use of 0 to mean both a null pointer and, er, zero. Using 0 for both caused problems for obvious reasons, does f(0) call f(int) or f(int*)? So a brand new literal was added to the core language: nullptr. Its type is simply decltype(nullptr) so nullptr_t was added as a short cut:

namespace std {
    using nullptr_t = decltype(nullptr);
}
  • Thank you, but the nullptr itself can be a part of the STL... Is nullptr included in the core language to not require developers to include any header files? – embedc Aug 23 at 14:54
  • @embedc Any std typedefs like e.g. std::stize_tare provided through headers, so what? – πάντα ῥεῖ Aug 23 at 14:59
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    @embedc nullptr is a literal like 5, 'a' or "hello". While I can't imagine what it is, I would bet there is a good technical reason why a null pointer literal is better than having a nullptr-like object in std. Edit : For one thing, being a literal it's a prvalue so you can't take it's address. It would seem strange to me to be able to take nullptr's address. It would be like getting true's address. – François Andrieux Aug 23 at 14:59
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    No headers are required. It is a built-in keyword / pointer literal. – Ron Aug 23 at 15:03
1

From cppreference.com:

std::nullptr_t is the type of the null pointer literal, nullptr. It is a distinct type that is not itself a pointer type or a pointer to member type.

If two or more overloads accept different pointer types, an overload for std::nullptr_t is necessary to accept a null pointer argument.

You can then solve overloaded function call ambiguity with std::nullptr_t.

For example:

void Foo(int* ptr) {}
void Foo(double* ptr) {}
void Foo(std::nullptr_t ptr) {} // This overload is called if Foo(nullptr) is invoked

Read more about std::nullptr_t here: https://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/types/nullptr_t

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