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I'm stuck on resize vertically part of resize problem. I know from Zamayla's pseudocode that i need to write an array each time on the outfile but I don't know how to pass values from one for to the other. Do I need to use malloc function and to pass via a pointer ? I'm not very experienced using this, because i'm new to programming. Please tell me if my code is going in the right direction.

// Resize a bmp file 

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

#include "bmp.h"

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
// ensure proper usage
if (argc != 4)
{
    fprintf(stderr, "Usage: resize queficient infile outfile\n");
    return 1;
}
int n = atoi(argv[1]);

if (n < 1 || n > 100)
    {
        printf ("Resize queficient should be between 1 and 100\n");
        return 1;
    }


// remember filenames
char *infile = argv[2];
char *outfile = argv[3];
// open input file
FILE *inptr = fopen(infile, "r");
if (inptr == NULL)
{
    fprintf(stderr, "Could not open %s.\n", infile);
    return 2;
}

// open output file
FILE *outptr = fopen(outfile, "w");
if (outptr == NULL)
{
    fclose(inptr);
    fprintf(stderr, "Could not create %s.\n", outfile);
    return 3;
}

// read infile's BITMAPFILEHEADER
BITMAPFILEHEADER bf;
fread(&bf, sizeof(BITMAPFILEHEADER), 1, inptr);

// read infile's BITMAPINFOHEADER
BITMAPINFOHEADER bi;
fread(&bi, sizeof(BITMAPINFOHEADER), 1, inptr);


// ensure infile is (likely) a 24-bit uncompressed BMP 4.0
if (bf.bfType != 0x4d42 || bf.bfOffBits != 54 || bi.biSize != 40 ||
    bi.biBitCount != 24 || bi.biCompression != 0)
{
    fclose(outptr);
    fclose(inptr);
    fprintf(stderr, "Unsupported file format.\n");
    return 4;
}
/* Update header info
*saving old information
*/
BITMAPINFOHEADER old_bi;
BITMAPFILEHEADER old_bf;
old_bi = bi;
old_bf = bf;
old_bi.biHeight = bi.biHeight;
old_bi.biWidth = bi.biWidth;
int old_padding = (4 - (bi.biWidth * sizeof(RGBTRIPLE)) % 4) % 4;

// assign new header
bi.biHeight = bi.biHeight * n;
bi.biWidth = bi.biWidth * n;
int new_padding = (4 - (bi.biWidth * sizeof(RGBTRIPLE)) % 4) % 4;
bi.biSizeImage = ((sizeof(RGBTRIPLE) * bi.biWidth) + new_padding) * abs(bi.biHeight);
bf.bfSize = bi.biSizeImage + sizeof(BITMAPFILEHEADER) + sizeof(BITMAPINFOHEADER);

// write outfile's BITMAPFILEHEADER
fwrite(&bf, sizeof(BITMAPFILEHEADER), 1, outptr);

// write outfile's BITMAPINFOHEADER
fwrite(&bi, sizeof(BITMAPINFOHEADER), 1, outptr);



// Resize horizontally
for (int i = 0, old_biHeight = abs(old_bi.biHeight); i < old_biHeight; i++)
{
    // iterate over pixels in scanline
    for (int j = 0; j < old_bi.biWidth; j++)
    {

        // temporary storage
        RGBTRIPLE triple;

        // read RGB triple from infile
        fread(&triple, sizeof(RGBTRIPLE), 1, inptr);

        triple.rgbtBlue = n * triple.rgbtBlue;
        triple.rgbtRed = n * triple.rgbtRed;
        triple.rgbtGreen = n * triple.rgbtGreen;

        // write RGB triple to outfile
        fwrite(&triple, sizeof(RGBTRIPLE), 1, outptr);
    }

    // skip over padding, if any
    fseek(inptr, old_padding, SEEK_CUR);

    // then add it back (to demonstrate how)
    for (int k = 0; k < old_padding; k++)
    {
        fputc(0x00, outptr);
    }
}

/*Resize vertically
for (int i = 0, old_biHeight = abs(old_bi.biHeight); i < old_biHeight; i++ )
{
    for (int j = 0; j < old_bi.biWidth; j++)
    {
        RGBTRIPLE triple;
        char *array_of_pixels_Blue  = { "n * triple.rgbtBlue" };
        char *array_of_pixels_Red  = { "n * triple.rgbtRed" };
        char *array_of_pixels_Green  = { "n * triple.rgbtGreen" };
    }

    for (int k = 0; k < n; k++)
    {
        fwrite(&array_of_pixels_Blue, sizeof(RGBTRIPLE), 1, outptr);
        fwrite(&array_of_pixels_Red, sizeof(RGBTRIPLE), 1, outptr);
        fwrite(&array_of_pixels_Green, sizeof(RGBTRIPLE), 1, outptr);

        for (int l = 0; l < new_padding; l++)
        {
            fputc(0x00, outptr);
        }
    }
}
    fseek(inptr, new_padding, SEEK_CUR);
*/

// close infile
fclose(inptr);

// close outfile
fclose(outptr);

// success
return 0;
}
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  • 3
    n * triple.rgbtBlue doesn't do what you think it does (I think)... It doesn't "enlarge" the pixel, it only makes the blue component more intense, unless you overflow the value of course, then you could make it less intense. For resizing a matrix (which is what an image basically is) then I suggest you draw it down on paper and try your operations on paper first. Enlarging an image means you need to duplicate the actual pixels (a doubling of size means you need double the pixels). And you can't do separate vertical and horizontal resizing. Commented Aug 26, 2019 at 7:10
  • @Someprogrammerdude: You said And you can't do separate vertical and horizontal resizing. What do you mean by that? If preserving aspect ratio is not important, they should be largely independent.
    – virolino
    Commented Aug 26, 2019 at 7:57
  • @virolino If you look at the current code in the question, you will see that the OP is reading pixel by pixel from the input wile, multiplying the color values and then write the pixel to the output file. This seems to be the OP's way of "resize horizontally" (which doesn't really do that). Then the OP have a commented loop to do the vertical resize. This simply won't work, the horizontal and vertical sizes can't be resized like that, separately from each other. Commented Aug 26, 2019 at 8:05
  • It is obvious that changing color intensity in any way does not equate to resizing. But I have a problem in understanding why resizing cannot be independent - regardless of the context, this problem or another. They can be done in one (complex) step, or in two successive (simple) steps. Also, I ignore the issues of intepolation, resize factors smaller than one...
    – virolino
    Commented Aug 26, 2019 at 8:13
  • I suppose if u continue with advices you will give me the solution but I don't understand how to acces the pixels without working with RGBTRIPLE values. I understood on paper how this should be done each pixel should be duplicated if n is 2 and than each row need to be duplicated aswell.
    – Criticalll
    Commented Aug 26, 2019 at 9:08

2 Answers 2

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For simplicity's sake lets say the source image is 3x2 pixels. If you draw it out on "paper" (which I really recommend you do, with real pen and paper) with the pixel coordinates it would look something like this:

+-----+-----+-----+
| 0,0 | 1,0 | 2,0 |
+-----+-----+-----+
| 0,1 | 1,1 | 2,1 |
+-----+-----+-----+

If you multiply this with 2 (to get a double-sized image) then that becomes a 6x4 pixel image. And the easiest way to enlarge the pixels is simply to double them as well, in all directions. Then that enlarged image would look something like this (with the pixel coordinates of the orginial image):

+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+
| 0,0 | 0,0 | 1,0 | 1,0 | 2,0 | 2,0 |
+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+
| 0,0 | 0,0 | 1,0 | 1,0 | 2,0 | 2,0 |
+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+
| 0,1 | 0,1 | 1,1 | 1,1 | 2,2 | 2,2 |
+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+
| 0,1 | 0,1 | 1,1 | 1,1 | 2,2 | 2,2 |
+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+

Each pixel from the original image is now four pixels in the new image. The size grows by the square of the multiplier (so a multiplier of 3 means each pixel in the original images becomes 9 pixels in the new image).

There are a few different ways to handle it code-wise, but the simplest is to allocate two memory areas, one for the original image being WxH "pixels" large, and the other being (W*n)x(H*n) "pixels" large. Then you use a loop to fetch each single pixel from the original image, and nested inside you have another loop that writes that pixel to all its locations in the new image.

In pseudo code it could be something like this

// Loops over all the pixels in the original source image
for (unsigned orig_x = 0; orig_x < ORIG_WIDTH; ++orig_x)
{
    for (unsigned orig_y = 0; orig_y < ORIG_HEIGHT; ++orig_y)
    {
        orig_pixel = GetPixelAt(orig_pixel_data, orig_x, orig_y);

        // Write the original pixel (orig_pixel) N*N times in the new image data
        for (unsigned new_x = 0; new_x < N; ++new_x)
        {
            for (unsigned new_y = 0; new_y < N; ++new_y)
            {
                SetPixelAt(new_pixel_data, new_x + orig_x * N, new_y + orig_y * N, orig_pixel);
            }
        }
    }
}

Now as you might have noticed, I haven't mentioned the type of "pixels". That's because it doesn't matter. It could be floating point value, integer value, or structures of RGBTRIPLE.

And as I mentioned before, do it all using pen and paper first.

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  • this explanation is so different than Zamayla's. What GetPixelAt function do? I can't find it in man.
    – Criticalll
    Commented Aug 26, 2019 at 12:07
  • @Criticalll Note that I say it's pseudo code. It's not real code, but just a code-like example on how to do it. You have to do the rest yourself, like the "get" and "set" functions (which doesn't have to be functions). Commented Aug 26, 2019 at 12:20
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There are different ways to handle this. One option is to:

  • Read each row once, and write that row n times.
  • Read each pixel once, write that pixel n times.

Also note, in Windows you need "rb" and "wb" to read/write files in binary:

Example:

FILE *outptr = fopen(outfile, "wb");
...
FILE *inptr = fopen(infile, "rb");
...
fwrite(&bf, sizeof(BITMAPFILEHEADER), 1, outptr);
fwrite(&bi, sizeof(BITMAPINFOHEADER), 1, outptr);

int old_width_in_bytes = old_bi.biWidth * 3 + old_padding;

for(int i = 0, old_biHeight = abs(old_bi.biHeight); i < old_biHeight; i++)
{
    //skip bytes for each row, 54 bytes to account for header size
    //old_width_in_bytes to account for padding
    fseek(inptr, 54 + old_width_in_bytes * i, SEEK_SET);

    //read/write each row, n-times
    for(int resize_height = 0; resize_height < n; resize_height++)
    {
        // iterate over pixels in scanline
        for(int j = 0; j < old_bi.biWidth; j++)
        {
            RGBTRIPLE triple;
            fread(&triple, sizeof(RGBTRIPLE), 1, inptr);

            // write each pixel n-times
            for(int resize_width = 0; resize_width < n; resize_width++)
                fwrite(&triple, sizeof(RGBTRIPLE), 1, outptr);
        }

        //padding for output
        for(int k = 0; k < new_padding; k++)
            fputc(0x00, outptr);
    }
}

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