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I Have A REST API and inside its POST action , I need to call method and don't wait for it and return result.

I need a methodology to guarantee that this method will be called and fully executed in background.

I Tried executing this method in Task but it failed sometimes and sometimes succeeded.

public string Post([FromBody]Accounts accounts)
{
    Task.Run(() =>
    {
         ExecuteApi(); //I don't want to wait this method execution    
    });
    return "Success";
}
public void ExecuteApi(string request)
{
       string formattedResponse = "";
       string apiURL = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["URL"];
       using (var client = new HttpClient())
        {
            client.BaseAddress = new Uri(apiURL);
            client.DefaultRequestHeaders.Accept.Clear();
            client.DefaultRequestHeaders.Accept.Add(new 
            MediaTypeWithQualityHeaderValue("application/xml"));
            string url = apiURL;
             StringContent contentA = new StringContent(request, 
            Encoding.UTF8, "application/xml");

                var apiResponse = client.PostAsync(url, contentA).Result;
        }
}
  • you may want to try 'Asyn` with tasks. Or you can also use Dispatch Invoker. – praty Aug 26 '19 at 7:47
  • 2
    but it failed sometimes and sometimes succeeded. So that code does work sometimes and sometimes it doesn't... Show that code! – Patrick Hofman Aug 26 '19 at 7:47
  • If you don't want to wait this method execution - don't call it in controller action. Most likely your task is killed long before your CallMethod() is called. – vasily.sib Aug 26 '19 at 7:57
  • 1
    "it failed sometimes and sometimes succeeded" - what does that mean exactly? Does it sometimes not get called at all, or does it sometimes not finish? Can you debug and check: 1. Is it called in every call of Post? 2. Does it throw some exception? – Fildor Aug 26 '19 at 7:57
  • 1. var apiResponse = client.GetAsync(url).Result; That's a NoNo! Go "async all the way" 2. You are using HttpClient wrong – Fildor Aug 26 '19 at 8:08
1

Task.Run(..) creates new Task instance which is doing some job. But you should be aware, that when your API send to your user 200 OK (when you return "Success" and exit you Post(..) action) - your controller is disposed and this Task become "garbadge-collectable". So, sometimes your GC is fast enough to kill your Task before it executes, sometimes not.

You may think that storing your Task in a private field might be a good solution for this issue (spoiler: it's not)

private Task _aTask;

public string Post([FromBody]Accounts accounts)
{
    _aTask = Task.Run(() => ExecuteApi()); // this will not help
    return "Success";
}

This will not work as your controller instance is GC after your API call.


So now for the solutions:

1. The best solution: if you need it - await it.

public async Task<string> Post([FromBody]Accounts accounts)
{
    await ExecuteApiAsync();
    return "Success";
}

public async Task ExecuteApiAsync(string mobileNumber)
{
    // ...
    // WARNING! Bad use of HttpClient class here.
    // You should NOT create too many HttpClient instances eventhough you dispose them right.
    // Read this: https://softwareengineering.stackexchange.com/questions/330364/should-we-create-a-new-single-instance-of-httpclient-for-all-requests
    // and this: https://aspnetmonsters.com/2016/08/2016-08-27-httpclientwrong/
    using (var client = new HttpClient())
    {
        // ...
        await client.GetAsync(url);
    }
}

2. Good solution: use QueueBackgroundWorkItem or any other 3rd party task schedulers. For example Hangfire or any other.

3. Sort-of-good solution: write your own task scheduler.

| improve this answer | |
  • What about QueueBackgroundWorkItem (QBWI)? – Mohammed Nasser Aug 27 '19 at 8:39
  • @MohammedNasser, I have never work with this QBWI, but looks like it fits your needs. I will edit my answer. – vasily.sib Aug 27 '19 at 9:06

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