8

I have 2 lines from an output as follow:

a b c
x y z

I would like to pipe both lines from the last command into a script that would combine them "interlaced", like this:

a x b y c z

The solution should work for a random number of columns from the output, such as:

a b c d e
x y z x y

Should result in:

a x b y c z d x e y

So far, I have tried using awk, perl, sed, etc... but without success. All I can do, is to put the output into one line, but it won't be "interlaced":

$ echo -e 'a b c\nx y z' | tr '\n' ' ' | sed 's/$/\n/'
a b c x y z
  • 1
    Not sure if duplicate, as I cannot use arrays, it has to be 2 lines passed from the pipeline into another awk/perl/bash script. – user11980390 Aug 26 at 20:09
  • I don't know why this got closed. Here is a Perl command you can pipe your output into that will do what you want: perl -e '@a=split " ",<STDIN>; @b=split " ",<STDIN>; while ($a=shift @a) {print $a," ",(shift @b)," "}' – Jeff Y Aug 26 at 20:45
  • <> instead of <STDIN> would be more flexible. – ikegami Aug 26 at 23:03
4

Keep fields of odd numbered records in an array, and update the fields of even numbered records using it. This will interlace each pair of successive lines in input.

prog | awk 'NR%2{split($0,a);next} {for(i in a)$i=(a[i] OFS $i)} 1'
4

Here's a 3 step solution:

$ # get one argument per line
$ printf 'a b c\nx y z' | xargs -n1
a
b
c
x
y
z

$ # split numbers of lines by 2 and combine them side by side
$ printf 'a b c\nx y z' | xargs -n1 | pr -2ts' '
a x
b y
c z

$ # combine all input lines into single line
$ printf 'a b c\nx y z' | xargs -n1 | pr -2ts' ' | paste -sd' '
a x b y c z
$ printf 'a b c d e\nx y z 1 2' | xargs -n1 | pr -2ts' ' | paste -sd' '
a x b y c z d 1 e 2
1

Could you please try following, it will join every 2 lines in "interlaced" fashion as follows.

awk '
FNR%2!=0 && FNR>1{
  for(j=1;j<=NF;j++){
     printf("%s%s",a[j],j==NF?ORS:OFS)
     delete a
  }
}
{
  for(i=1;i<=NF;i++){
     a[i]=(a[i]?a[i] OFS:"")$i}
  }
END{
  for(j=1;j<=NF;j++){
     printf("%s%s",a[j],j==NF?ORS:OFS)
  }
}'  Input_file
1

Here is a simple awk script

script.awk

NR == 1 {split($0,inArr1)}  # read fields frrom 1st line into arry1
NR == 2 {split($0,inArr2);  # read fields frrom 2nd line into arry2
    for (i = 1; i <= NF; i++) printf("%s%s%s%s", inArr1[i], OFS, inArr2[i], OFS); # ouput interlace fields from arr1 and arr2
    print; # terminate output line.
}

input.txt

a b c d e
x y z x y

running:

awk -f script.awk input.txt

output:

a x b y c z d x e y x y z x y
0

Multiline awk solution:

interlaced.awk

{
    a[NR] = $0
}

END {
    split(a[1], b)
    split(a[2], c)
    for (i in b) {
        printf "%s%s %s", i==1?"":OFS, b[i], c[i]
    }   
    print ORS
}

Run it like this:

foo_program | awk -f interlaced.awk
  • 2
    This consumes quite a lot of memory if the input file is large. Processing each pair of lines as they come in would be more scalable (assuming you don't have individual lines which are several gigabytes). – tripleee Aug 27 at 5:30
  • 1
    @tripleee The solution is for two lines of program output, as described in the question. If the OP wants/has to post-process GB-large program output this way, the problem lays somewhere else. I really always keep the efficiency in mind, in this case it seemed off for me. – hek2mgl Aug 27 at 6:03
0

Perl will do the job. It was invented for this type of task.

echo -e 'a b c\nx y z' | \
perl -MList::MoreUtils=mesh -e \
'@f=mesh @{[split " ", <>]}, @{[split " ", <>]}; print "@f"'

 

a x b y c z

You can of course print out the meshed output any way you want. Check out http://metacpan.org/pod/List::MoreUtils#mesh

You could even make it into a shell function for easy use:

function meshy {
perl -MList::MoreUtils=mesh -e \
'@f=mesh @{[split " ", <>]}, @{[split " ", <>]}; print "@f"'
}

$ echo -e 'X Y Z W\nx y z w' |meshy
X x Y y Z z W w
$

Ain't Perl grand?

0

This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed -E 'N;H;x;:a;s/\n(\S+\s+)(.*\n)(\S+\s+)/\1\3\n\2/;ta;s/\n//;s// /;h;z;x' file

Process two lines at time. Append two lines in the pattern space to the hold space which will introduce a newline at the front of the two lines. Using pattern matching and back references, nibble away at the front of each of the two lines and place the pairs at the front. Eventually, the pattern matching fails, then remove the first newline and replace the second by a space. Copy the amended line to hold space, clean up the pattern space ready for the next couple of line (if any) and print.

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