7106

I have an array of Numbers, and I'm using the .push() method to add elements to it.

Is there a simple way to remove a specific element from an array? The equivalent of something like array.remove(number);.

I have to use core JavaScript - no frameworks are allowed.

  • 94
    If you need to support <IE9 (sigh) then check this SO question regarding indexOf in IE. – Scotty.NET Sep 13 '13 at 7:48
  • 21
    (lodash) array = ['a', 'b', 'c']; _.pull(array, 'a') // array => ['b', 'c']; See also stackoverflow.com/questions/5767325/… – Chun Yang Aug 25 '15 at 20:28
  • 7
    filter method can do what you want. – Salvador Dali Sep 5 '15 at 23:43
  • 5
    You can use delete but it will not rearange the index instead it will set this slot to 'undefined × 1'. For example: var list = [1,2,3,4,5,6] -> delete list[1] -> [1, undefined × 1, 3, 4, 5, 6]. – DevWL May 24 '16 at 23:26
  • 6
    Here a performance benchmark of the two major possibilities: jsben.ch/#/b4Ume – EscapeNetscape Mar 3 '17 at 16:46

79 Answers 79

2

The following method will remove all entries of a given value from an array without creating a new array and with only one iteration which is superfast. And it works in ancient Internet Explorer 5.5 browser:

function removeFromArray(arr, removeValue) {
  for (var i = 0, k = 0, len = arr.length >>> 0; i < len; i++) {
    if (k > 0)
      arr[i - k] = arr[i];

    if (arr[i] === removeValue)
      k++;
  }

  for (; k--;)
    arr.pop();
}

var a = [0, 1, 0, 2, 0, 3];

document.getElementById('code').innerHTML =
  'Initial array [' + a.join(', ') + ']';
//Initial array [0, 1, 0, 2, 0, 3]

removeFromArray(a, 0);

document.getElementById('code').innerHTML +=
  '<br>Resulting array [' + a.join(', ') + ']';
//Resulting array [1, 2, 3]
<code id="code"></code>

  • What is meaning of this code I could not understand. – Ankur Loriya Dec 17 '15 at 14:22
  • @AnkurLoriya This code removes all 0s from the given array – Eugene Tiurin Dec 25 '15 at 19:16
2

What a shame you have an array of integers, not an object where the keys are string equivalents of these integers.

I've looked through a lot of these answers and they all seem to use "brute force" as far as I can see. I haven't examined every single one, apologies if this is not so. For a smallish array this is fine, but what if you have 000s of integers in it?

Correct me if I'm wrong, but can't we assume that in a key => value map, of the kind which a JS object is, that the key retrieval mechanism can be assumed to be highly engineered and optimised? (NB if some super-expert tells me that this is not the case, I can suggest using ES6's Map class instead, which certainly will be).

I'm just suggesting that, in certain circumstances, the best solution might be to convert your array to an object... the problem being, of course, that you might have repeating integer values. I suggest putting those in buckets as the "value" part of the key => value entries. (NB if you are sure you don't have any repeating array elements this can be much simpler: values "same as" keys, and just go Object.values(...) to get back your modified array).

So you could do:

const arr = [ 1, 2, 55, 3, 2, 4, 55 ];
const f =   function( acc, val, currIndex ){ 
    // not seen this val before: make bucket... NB although val's typeof is 'number'
    // there is seamless equivalence between the object key (always string)
    // and this variable val 
    ! ( val in acc ) ? acc[ val ] = []: 0;
    // drop another array index in the bucket
    acc[ val ].push( currIndex );
    return acc; 
}
const myIntsMapObj = arr.reduce( f, {});

console.log( myIntsMapObj );

output:

Object [ <1 empty slot>, Array1, Array[2], Array1, Array1, <5 empty slots>, 46 more… ]

it is then easy to delete all the numbers 55

delete myIntsMapObj[ 55 ]; // again, although keys are strings this works

You don't have to delete them all: index values are pushed into their buckets in order of appearance, so (for example):

myIntsMapObj[ 55 ].shift(); // and
myIntsMapObj[ 55 ].pop(); 

will delete the first and last occurrence respectively. You can count frequency of occurrence easily, replace all 55s with 3s by transferring the contents of one bucket to another, etc.

... getting back your modified int array is slightly involved: but each bucket contains the index (in the original array) of the value represented by the (string) key. Each of these bucket values is also unique: so you turn them into keys in a new object, with the (real) integer from the "integer string key" as value... then sort the keys and go Object.values( ... ).

This sounds very involved and time-consuming... but obviously everything depends on the circumstances and desired usage. My understanding is that all versions and contexts of JS operate only in one thread, and the thread doesn't "let go", so there could be some horrible congestion with a "brute force" method: caused not so much by the indexOf ops, but multiple repeated slice/splice ops.

Addendum
If you're sure this is too much engineering for your use case surely the simplest "brute force" approach is

const arr = [ 1, 2, 3, 66, 8, 2, 3, 2 ];
const newArray = arr.filter( number => number !== 3 );
console.log( newArray )

(yes, other answers have spotted Array.prototype.filter...)

2

delete element from last

arrName.pop();

delete element from first

arrName.shift();

delete from middle

arrName.splice(starting index,number of element you wnt to delete);

Ex: arrName.splice(1,1);

delete one element from last

arrName.splice(-1);

Delete by using array index number

 delete arrName[1];
2

I had this problem myself (in a situation where replacing the array was acceptable) and solved it with a simple:

var filteredItems = this.items.filter(function (i) {
    return i !== item;
});

To give the above snippet a bit of context:

self.thingWithItems = {
        items: [],
        removeItem: function (item) {
            var filteredItems = this.items.filter(function (i) {
                return i !== item;
            });

            this.items = filteredItems;
        }
    };

This solution should work with both reference and value items. It all depends whether you need to maintain a reference to the original array as to whether this solution is applicable.

2

To remove particular element or subsequent elements, Array.splice() method works well. The splice() method changes the contents of an array by removing or replacing existing elements and/or adding new elements and it returns the removed item(s).

Syntax: array.splice(index, deleteCount, item1, ....., itemX)

Here index is mandatory and rest arguments are optional.

For example:

let arr = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6];
arr.splice(2,1);
console.log(arr);
// [1, 2, 4, 5, 6]

Note: Array.splice() method can be used if you know the index of the element which you want to delete. But we may have a few more cases as mentioned below-

  1. In case you want to delete just last element, you can use Array.pop()

  2. In case you want to delete just first element, you can use Array.shift()

  3. If you know the element alone but not the position(or index) of the element, and want to delete all matching elements using Array.filter() method:

    let arr = [1, 2, 1, 3, 4, 1, 5, 1];
    
    let newArr = arr.filter(function(val){
        return val !== 1;
     });
     //newArr => [2, 3, 4, 5]
    

OR by using splice() method as-

let arr = [1, 11, 2, 11, 3, 4, 5, 11, 6, 11];
    for( let i = 0; i < arr.length-1; i++){
       if ( arr[i] === 11) {
         arr.splice(i, 1); 
       }
    }
    console.log(arr);
    // [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]

OR suppose we want to delete del from the Array arr:

let arr = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6];
let del = 4;
if(arr.indexOf(4) >= 0) {
arr.splice(arr.indexOf(4), 1)
}

OR

let del = 4;
for(var i = arr.length - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
    if(arr[i] === del) {
       arr.splice(i, 1);
    }
}
  1. If you know the element alone but not the position(or index) of the element, and want to delete just very first matching element using splice() method:

    let arr = [1, 11, 2, 11, 3, 4, 5, 11, 6, 11];
    
    for( let i = 0; i < arr.length-1; i++){
      if ( arr[i] === 11) {
        arr.splice(i, 1);
        break;
      }
    }
    console.log(arr);
    // [1, 11, 2, 11, 3, 4, 5, 11, 6, 11]
    
  • Note: Array.prototype.filter is ECMAScript 5.1 (No IE8) – Chang Jan 27 at 19:46
2

Oftentimes it's better to just create a new array with the filter function.

const array = [1,2,3,4];
array = array.filter(i => i !== 4); // [1,2,3]

This also improves readability imho. I'm not a fan of slice, although it know sometimes you should go for it.

2
[2,3,5].filter(i => ![5].includes(i))
1

If you must support older versions of Internet Explorer, I recommend using the following polyfill (note: this is not a framework). It's a 100% backwards-compatible replacement of all modern array methods (JavaScript 1.8.5 / ECMAScript 5 Array Extras) that works for Internet Explorer 6+, Firefox 1.5+, Chrome, Safari, & Opera.

https://github.com/plusdude/array-generics

  • 3
    While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. – sampathsris May 18 '15 at 3:03
  • 1
    Sadly, the internet (and Stack Overflow) are filled with half-implemented, partially-correct versions of ES5 array methods. That is entirely the point of the linking to the polyfill. For a truly complete reproduction of all of the correct behaviors, it isn't good enough to summarize "the essential parts." You have to implement all of the edge conditions as well. To reproduce their content in its entirety is well beyond the scope of Stack Overflow. Stack Overflow is not GitHub. – Matt Brock May 18 '15 at 13:38
1

Define a method named remove() on array objects using prototying feature of JavaScript.

Use splice() method to fulfill your requirement.

Please have a look at the below code.

Array.prototype.remove = function(item) {
    // index will have -1 if item does not exist
    // else it will have the index of 1st item found in array
    var index = this.indexOf(item); 

    if (index > -1) {
        // splice() method is used to add/remove items(s) in array
        this.splice(index, 1); 
    }

    return index;
}


var arr = [ 11, 22, 67, 45, 61, 89, 34, 12, 7, 8, 3, -1, -4];

// Printing array
// [ 11, 22, 67, 45, 61, 89, 34, 12, 7, 8, 3, -1, -4];
console.log(arr)

// Removing 67 (getting its index i.e. 2)
console.log("Removing 67")
var index = arr.remove(67)

if (index > 0){
    console.log("Item 67 found at ", index)
} else {
    console.log("Item 67 does not exist in array")
}

// Printing updated array
// [ 11, 22, 45, 61, 89, 34, 12, 7, 8, 3, -1, -4];
console.log(arr)

// ............... Output ................................
// [ 11, 22, 67, 45, 61, 89, 34, 12, 7, 8, 3, -1, -4 ]
// Removing 67
// Item 67 found at  2
// [ 11, 22, 45, 61, 89, 34, 12, 7, 8, 3, -1, -4 ]

Note: Below is the full example code executed on Node.js REPL which describes the use of push(), pop(), shift(), unshift() and splice() methods.

> // Defining an array
undefined
> var arr = [12, 45, 67, 89, 34, 12, 7, 8, 3, -1, -4, -11, 0, 56, 12, 34];
undefined
> // Getting length of array
undefined
> arr.length;
16
> // Adding 1 more item at the end i.e. pushing an item
undefined
> arr.push(55);
17
> arr
[ 12, 45, 67, 89, 34, 12, 7, 8, 3, -1, -4, -11, 0, 56, 12, 34, 55 ]
> // Popping item from array (i.e. from end)
undefined
> arr.pop()
55
> arr
[ 12, 45, 67, 89, 34, 12, 7, 8, 3, -1, -4, -11, 0, 56, 12, 34 ]
> // Remove item from beginning
undefined
> arr.shift()
12
> arr
[ 45, 67, 89, 34, 12, 7, 8, 3, -1, -4, -11, 0, 56, 12, 34 ]
> // Add item(s) at beginning
undefined
> arr.unshift(67); // Add 67 at begining of the array and return number of items in updated/new array
16
> arr
[ 67, 45, 67, 89, 34, 12, 7, 8, 3, -1, -4, -11, 0, 56, 12, 34 ]
> arr.unshift(11, 22); // Adding 2 more items at the beginning of array
18
> arr
[ 11, 22, 67, 45, 67, 89, 34, 12, 7, 8, 3, -1, -4, -11, 0, 56, 12, 34 ]
>
> // Define a method on array (temorarily) to remove an item and return the index of removed item; if it is found else return -1
undefined
> Array.prototype.remove = function(item) {
... var index = this.indexOf(item);
... if (index > -1) {
..... this.splice(index, 1); // splice() method is used to add/remove items in array
..... }
... return index;
... }
[Function]
>
> arr
[ 11, 22, 67, 45, 67, 89, 34, 12, 7, 8, 3, -1, -4, -11, 0, 56, 12, 34 ]
>
> arr.remove(45);   // Remove 45 (You will get the index of removed item)
3
> arr
[ 11, 22, 67, 67, 89, 34, 12, 7, 8, 3, -1, -4, -11, 0, 56, 12, 34 ]
>
> arr.remove(22)    // Remove 22
1
> arr
[ 11, 67, 67, 89, 34, 12, 7, 8, 3, -1, -4, -11, 0, 56, 12, 34 ]
> arr.remove(67)    // Remove 67
1
> arr
[ 11, 67, 89, 34, 12, 7, 8, 3, -1, -4, -11, 0, 56, 12, 34 ]
>
> arr.remove(89)    // Remove 89
2
> arr
[ 11, 67, 34, 12, 7, 8, 3, -1, -4, -11, 0, 56, 12, 34 ]
>
> arr.remove(100);  // 100 doesn't exist, remove() will return -1
-1
>

Thanks.

1

Splice, filter and delete to remove element from array

Every array have their index and it helps to delete particular element with their index.

The splice() method

array.splice(index, 1); 1st parameter is index and second is the number of element you

want to delete from that index.

So for single element we use 1.

The delete method

delete array[index]

The filter() method

If you want to delete element which is repeated in array then filter the array.

removeAll =array.filter( e=> e != elem );

where elem is the element you want to remove from array and array is your array name

0
Array.prototype.remove = function(x) {
    var y=this.slice(x+1);
    var z=[];
    for(i=0;i<=x-1;i++) {
        z[z.length] = this[i];
    }

    for(i=0;i<y.length;i++){
        z[z.length]=y[i];
    }

    return z;
}
0

There are already a lot of answers, but because no one has done it with a one liner yet, I figured I'd show my method. It takes advantage of the fact that the string.split() function will remove all of the specified characters when creating an array. Here is an example:

var ary = [1,2,3,4,1234,10,4,5,7,3];
out = ary.join("-").split("-4-").join("-").split("-");
console.log(out);

In this example, all of the 4's are being removed from the array ary. However, it is important to note that any array containing the character "-" will cause issues with this example. In short, it will cause the join("-") function to piece your string together improperly. In such a situation, all of the the "-" strings in the above snipet can be replaced with any string that will not be used in the original array. Here is another example:

var ary = [1,2,3,4,'-',1234,10,'-',4,5,7,3];
out = ary.join("!@#").split("!@#4!@#").join("!@#").split("!@#");
console.log(out);

  • This is only going to work with an array of integers... – Nathan Jul 17 '17 at 1:01
  • 1
    You can see that there are strings in the second example I provided? I am not sure what you mean by this? The only issue is if your string contains one of the charterers used in the separation, as I mentioned in my answer. – Partial Science Jul 20 '17 at 19:33
  • Interesting method, you can use Unicode characters for splitting (e.g. '\uD842') instead. For making it clearer and shorter for others, I'd just add a few more strings to the array elements (including '4') and take out the first snippet/example (people may have downvoted because they didn't even read the 2nd part). – CPHPython Feb 19 '18 at 16:25
0
var arr =[1,2,3,4,5];

arr.splice(0,1)

console.log(arr)

Output [2, 3, 4, 5];

0

The splice() method changes the contents of an array by removing or replacing existing elements and/or adding new elements.

array.splice(start[, deleteCount[, item1[, item2[, ...]]]])

start

Index at which to start changing the array (with origin 0). If greater than the length of the array, actual starting index will be set to the length of the array. If negative, will begin that many elements from the end of the array (with origin -1) and will be set to 0 if absolute value is greater than the length of the array.

deleteCount Optional

An integer indicating the number of old array elements to remove. If deleteCount is omitted, or if its value is larger than array.length - start (that is, if it is greater than the number of elements left in the array, starting at start), then all of the elements from start through the end of the array will be deleted. If deleteCount is 0 or negative, no elements are removed. In this case, you should specify at least one new element (see below).

item1, item2, ... Optional

The elements to add to the array, beginning at the start index. If you don't specify any elements, splice() will only remove elements from the array.

For more referene kindly go through :

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Array/splice

0

Taking profit of reduce method as following:

case a) if u need to remove element by index:

function remove(arr, index) {
  return arr.reduce((prev, x, i) => prev.concat(i !== index ? [x] : []), []);
}

case b) if u need to remove element by the value of the element (int):

function remove(arr, value) {
  return arr.reduce((prev, x, i) => prev.concat(x !== value ? [x] : []), []);
}

So at this way we can return a new array (will be a cool functional way - more much better than use push or splice) with the element removed.

-1
    Array.prototype.remove = function(start, end) {
        var n = this.slice((end || start) + 1 || this.length);
        return this.length = start < 0 ? this.length + start : start,
        this.push.apply(this, n)
    }

start and end can be negative, in that case they count from the end of the array.
if only start is specified, only one element is removed.
the function returns the new array length.

z=[0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9];

newlength=z.remove(2,6);

(8) [0, 1, 7, 8, 9]

z=[0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9];

newlength=z.remove(-4,-2);

(7) [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 9]

z=[0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9];

newlength=z.remove(3,-2);

(4) [0, 1, 2, 9]

-1

var array = [1,2,3];
console.log('Array-First',array); // Array-First 1,2,3
array.splice(1,1);
console.log('Array-Second',array); // Array-Second 1,3

-9
var ar1 = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9]
var toBeRemoved = 2;
ar1.splice( (ar1.length -toBeRemoved) , toBeRemoved);
  • It'll always remove total n elements from the last index of array. If you know the index of the item to be deleted, do something like- let ar1 = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9]; ar1.splice(fromIndex, howManyToBeDelete); For more clarification follow the link: stackoverflow.com/a/54390552/8958729 – Chang Jan 27 at 18:25
-11
let array = [5,5,4,4,2,3,4]    
let newArray = array.join(',').replace('5','').split(',')

This example works if you want to remove one current item.

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